Ad Monsters Presentation 10th October 2008

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Mark Hopwood's presentation to AdMonsters on October 10th 2007. http://blog.markhopwood.com/2007/10/11/admonsters-eu-leadership-forum-presentation-on-ugc/

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  • I’m Mark Hopwood, and I’m the Head of Technology at Agency.com in London. Agency.com is a 12 year old full-service digital agency, working with clients worldwide including British Airways, BT, Ikea, Del Monte and LG. We’re in 11 cities from San Francisco to Shanghai. In a past role I built an ad-server for an affiliate network, and I’m part of the IPA’s digital media group, which is how I find myself giving this presentation today. The self-portrait is a prompt for me to remind you that I am not in Agency.com’s award-winning creative department. As we go through the presentation, I hope you won’t be reminded of that too painfully. I want to talk to you today about some aspects of the impact on advertising operations of key trends that have been bundled together by many commentators and referred to as web 2.0. The term “web 2.0” should be greeted with some suspicion, and is generally used when trying to sell a web 2.0 product or service. That being said, there are some big differences between the web today, and how it was when I started my online career: Users are a lot more participative than they used to be, contributing and sharing huge amounts of content, through a host of social networking and content sharing websites They’re a lot less accepting of brand messages than they were, and this is shown in their response to banner advertising, which has halved in the last 2 years according to some reports Conversely, they’re paying a lot more notice to what their friends and other web users are saying: 30% of online travel bookers have changed their plans after reading a review, Forrester reported earlier this year, and fan sites, hate sites and reviews are big business today Consumers are a lot more interested in interacting with some brands than they used to be as well: our own client at Pringles has seen hundreds of videos uploaded to its “Pringles Spiderman” site, depicting their product as a super-hero in a variety of guises These changes are not without their challenges.
  • Ad Monsters Presentation 10th October 2008

    1. UGC, social networks and innovation ad operations in the interactive world Mark Hopwood: Head of Technology, Agency.com London [email_address]
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    4. ad operations in the interactive world Advertisers’ needs Challenges these raise Some possible answers What next?
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    7. <ul><li>Ethical compromises </li></ul><ul><li>Operational processes </li></ul>
    8. Advertiser & brand Individual freedoms Individual safety
    9. Advertiser & brand Individual freedoms Individual safety British National Party On Facebook Pro-ANA Anorexic sites Promoting fast food or gambling
    10. Innovation has to be part of a process
    11. Innovation has to be part of a process What standards do I need for the new formats? How do I compare past results with today’s? How do I reliably plan and buy non-traditional formats? How does a publisher break them up into zones or channels?
    12. Can we control which advertising goes next to which content?
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    14. <ul><li>More detailed classification systems </li></ul><ul><li>Self-classification by publisher </li></ul><ul><li>Automated auditing </li></ul>
    15. Is there a web 2.0 solution to a web 2.0 problem?
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    17. Automated content analysis
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    21. A quick look into the near future…
    22. Looking forward
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    24. Thank you! Mark Hopwood: Head of Technology, Agency.com London [email_address]

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