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PROVIDING LEARNING AND REFLECTION
OPPORTUNITIES TO DEVELOP IN-SERVICE
CS TEACHERS
Mark Guzdial
2 June 2015
Why teach CS in Schools?
2
In the US, we argue for job skills.
In Germany and UK (Computing
at School), CS seen as a rigor...
What makes CS Education Hard
3
There are few external constraints or rules on what can be
programmed.
• Mathematics and Ph...
Challenges of US CS Education
4
Highly gender & race skewed.
About 1 in 12 of US high schools have a CS teachers.
Practica...
Thanks to
Brian
Danielak
Meeting the Challenges
6
How we provide opportunities to in-service teachers for
reflection with feedback?
How do we influ...
Meeting the Challenges
7
How we provide opportunities to in-service teachers for
reflection with feedback?
• Story #1: Dis...
Story #1: DCCE: Providing Support for Reflection and Community
We need CS teachers to have a sense of
identity:
• More pro...
Teachers need their Communities
“I’m a better Math teacher, just because I’ve
had so much support. Whenever I have
problem...
Disciplinary Commons
Group of educators from diverse
institutions who teach within the same
subject area meeting monthly o...
DC Results
First goal was achieved, but not the second [1].
Two additional outcomes discovered:
1. Development of strong a...
DCCE in Georgia
Disciplinary Commons for Computing Educators
Adaptation – High School teachers AND University
Goals
1. Cre...
Creating DCCE
Mtg Month Original DC Topic DCCE Schedule
1 Oct
Institutional Context &
personal trajectory into
teaching
Pe...
Year 3
HS teachers only
Outside GA
Mtg Month Portfolio Section
1 Sept Personal trajectory into teaching, Selection Structu...
Building Community
Partnerships Before (PRE) DCCE Partnerships After (POST) DCCE
Overcoming isolation (comments)
Feedback,...
Improving Recruiting
302% increase in number of AP CS students in the
year following their participation in the DCCE
• Yea...
Teacher Confidence
“I think DCCE definitely did help [me feel more
confident]. I think it was just being a part of a
commu...
Story 2: Defining CS Teacher Identity
In the US, a teacher’s identity is defined by their teaching
certificate.
• What doe...
CS Teacher
Identity
Construct
(Luehmann, 2007;
Martin, 2000;
Pennington, 2002)
Belonging/
Affiliation
Identity as a Comput...
Research Agenda
 Data Collection:Interviewing
Participants: 9 CS teachers in Atlanta (Fall 2009)
Varied educational bac...
Participant Background
Teacher Educational Background Certificate
Alex
Electrical Engineering
Management
Technology Educat...
Findings: CS Teacher Identity
Struggling CS teachers with varied
self-identifications
– Computing/CS teacher
Alex, Becky, ...
Findings: CS Teacher Identity
Computing/programming/CS teacher
– CS defined as problem-solving with computers
– Commitment...
Summarizing Findings:
CS Teacher Identity
Teachers currently teaching (mainly) CS
do not necessarily see themselves CS
tea...
Findings: Self-Reported Influencing Factors
 Four main factors
 Educational background and certification
 CS curriculum...
Findings: Influencing Factors
 Educational background &Teaching certificate
[Rose]: “Really my degree is not in Computer ...
Findings: Influencing Factors
 CS Curriculum and Department Hierarchy
[Pat]: “One of the biggest problems I see is that C...
Findings: Influencing Factors
 Teachers’ Perceptions of the Subject (CS)
 Definition of CS/Computing
[Mary]: “Computer s...
Changing what we can
29
 Of the four main factors:
 Educational background and certification: State policy.
 CS curricu...
Story #3: Teaching CS Teachers online
30
We had a six-year effort to provide in-service
teacher professional development i...
A successful CS teacher…
31
• Writes assignments and comments, not code.
• Guides students through rubrics.
• Focus on lea...
How do we teach working high school teachers
online?
Study of adult/professional students in CS classes (i.e.,
apprentices...
Need a different model
An Ebook for Teaching CS Teachers
Why Ebooks over MOOCS
MOOCs put lectures (time-based) on-line.
– Our teachers fit the demographic of
MOOC non-completers.
...
Principled Ebook Design
Lower cognitive load
– Keep the germane. Reduce the extrinsic (e.g., programming
language details,...
Demo here
Or video if Internet fails
ActiveCode
Execute code in the
browser
Can edit the code
Results are displayed
Code Visualization
Step through the code
Displays variable and
object values
Shows program output
Low cognitive load
programming activities
We know that the cost of an erroneous semi-colon in
Java is typically 30 minutes...
Parsons Problems
Drag and drop code blocks in
correct order
Bank of code blocks
Feedback on order and
indention
CS PCK
Pedagogical Content Knowledge
– What are the learning difficulties that teachers might anticipate?
– What are usefu...
Social Pressure at Teacher Pace
Support for reading groups, who collaboratively negotiate a
schedule.
Summary: Designing for high school teachers
as CS learners
• Tools that are accessible, not authentic.
• Low cognitive loa...
Findings: What do users do in ebook?
Conclusions
How we provide opportunities to in-service teachers for
reflection with feedback?
• Disciplinary Commons for C...
Many thanks!
Colleagues: Barbara Ericson, Tom McKlin,
Lijun Ni, & Briana Morrison
Our Funders:
US National Science Foundat...
Thank you!
http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~mark.guzdial
– Lab: http://home.cc.gatech.edu/csl
– Ebook Access:
http://ebooks.cc.ga...
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Providing learning and reflection opportunities to develop in-service CS teachers

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Meeting the Challenges of Growing CS Teaching:
How we provide opportunities to in-service teachers for reflection with feedback?
Disciplinary Commons for Computing Education provides one model with an emphasis on community.

How do we influence the development of CS teacher identity?
The important factors we can influence are (a) a teacher community and (b) clear definitions of what is CS.

How do we provide Computer Science and Computer Science PCK learning opportunities in-service?
We are building and testing an ebook to meet teachers’ needs.

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Providing learning and reflection opportunities to develop in-service CS teachers

  1. 1. PROVIDING LEARNING AND REFLECTION OPPORTUNITIES TO DEVELOP IN-SERVICE CS TEACHERS Mark Guzdial 2 June 2015
  2. 2. Why teach CS in Schools? 2 In the US, we argue for job skills. In Germany and UK (Computing at School), CS seen as a rigorous field that helps students understand their world. Jeanette Wing argues for transferable Computational Thinking. I argue for CS to support “end- user programmers.” Code.org Over 12 million views
  3. 3. What makes CS Education Hard 3 There are few external constraints or rules on what can be programmed. • Mathematics and Physics are bound by constraints and rules that define the scope of learning. Programming is a process of controlling an external non-human agent(s) who only understands a formal language. • We know how to help students learn a formal language. • We know little about how to help students correct mistakes in a formal language. • Imagine: All equations and essays that must be correct. Most of what we know about teaching CS is about developing professional software developers. • For most of the world, that’s not why we put CS in schools.
  4. 4. Challenges of US CS Education 4 Highly gender & race skewed. About 1 in 12 of US high schools have a CS teachers. Practically, no pre-service Computer Science (CS) teacher education. • Too few CS Education faculty. Too few existing teachers. Almost all CS teacher education is in-service. Teachers who qualify for CS are mostly business teachers • Typically teach computer applications, keyboarding, accounting. • No Bachelors degree in CS required.
  5. 5. Thanks to Brian Danielak
  6. 6. Meeting the Challenges 6 How we provide opportunities to in-service teachers for reflection with feedback? How do we influence the development of CS teacher identity? How do we provide Computer Science and Computer Science PCK learning opportunities in-service?
  7. 7. Meeting the Challenges 7 How we provide opportunities to in-service teachers for reflection with feedback? • Story #1: Disciplinary Commons for Computing Education How do we influence the development of CS teacher identity? • Story #2: Lijun Ni’s Dissertation on CS teacher identity How do we provide Computer Science and Computer Science PCK learning opportunities in-service? • Story #3: Ebooks for online CS teacher education
  8. 8. Story #1: DCCE: Providing Support for Reflection and Community We need CS teachers to have a sense of identity: • More professional learning • Greater retention • Retention of CS teachers is exceedingly bad Where does that sense of identity come from? • For US CS teachers, from community and role models. (Lijun Ni, 2011) 8
  9. 9. Teachers need their Communities “I’m a better Math teacher, just because I’ve had so much support. Whenever I have problems, I can talk with the people that I work with, most of who have taught for many years in Math.…Every day, I’m eating lunch with Math teachers. With Computer Science, I’ve got nobody to talk to.” 9 From Lijun Ni’s 2011 thesis on CS teacher identity
  10. 10. Disciplinary Commons Group of educators from diverse institutions who teach within the same subject area meeting monthly over an academic year. In monthly increments, the participants prepare a course portfolio. Goals 1. To document and share knowledge about student learning in Computer Science classrooms. 2. To establish practices for the scholarship of teaching by making it public, peer-reviewed, and amenable for future use and development by other educators. [1] [1] Tenenberg, J. and Fincher, S. Opening the door of the computer science classroom: the Disciplinary Commons. SIGCSE Bull., 39, 1 2007, 514-518.
  11. 11. DC Results First goal was achieved, but not the second [1]. Two additional outcomes discovered: 1. Development of strong and vibrant community 2. The change of practice as a result of participation 2 additional replications evaluated in 2009-2010, different facilitators – Software Engineering centered in Illinois – Database centered in UK [1] Davis-Unger, A. and Maring, B. L. Disciplinary Commons: Brief Summary. <http://depts.washington.edu/comgrnd/leaders/OEADiscCommonsEval09.docx> , University of Washington, 2009.
  12. 12. DCCE in Georgia Disciplinary Commons for Computing Educators Adaptation – High School teachers AND University Goals 1. Creating community 2. Sharing resources and knowledge of how things are taught in other contexts AND… 3. Supporting student recruitment within the high school environment Work by Briana Morrison, Lijun Ni, Ria Galanos, & Allison Elliott Tew
  13. 13. Creating DCCE Mtg Month Original DC Topic DCCE Schedule 1 Oct Institutional Context & personal trajectory into teaching Personal trajectory into teaching 2 Nov Curricular Context Institutional Context, Recruiting 3 Dec Course Content Curricular Context, Course Content 4 Jan Instructional Design Instructional Design 5 Feb Student Assessment Teaching Philosophy, Reflection Log 6 Mar Evaluation Student Assessment, Grading Rubrics 7 Apr Delivery (including debrief of peer observation) Peer Observation Debrief 8 May Complete “first draft” overview Student Feedback 9 June Portfolio Presentations Portfolio Presentations GA specific: GA university computing curricula, HS competitions, field trip possibilities
  14. 14. Year 3 HS teachers only Outside GA Mtg Month Portfolio Section 1 Sept Personal trajectory into teaching, Selection Structures 2 Oct Institutional & Curricular Context, Repetition Structures 3 Nov Instructional Design, Recruiting, Teaching Classes 4 Jan Teaching Philosophy, Reflection Log, Arrays and Sorting 5 Feb Student Assessment, Grading Rubrics, Recursion 6 Mar Student Feedback, Inheritance / Polymorphism 7 Apr Peer Observation Debrief 8 May Portfolio Presentations • Discipline specific content area • Mini-conference to bring in University teachers
  15. 15. Building Community Partnerships Before (PRE) DCCE Partnerships After (POST) DCCE Overcoming isolation (comments) Feedback, diversity in environments
  16. 16. Improving Recruiting 302% increase in number of AP CS students in the year following their participation in the DCCE • Year of participation – 122 students enrolled • Next year – 491 students pre-registered • One teacher 700% increase (3 to 24 students) Reason? 1. Platform to share recruitment ideas 2. Sense of community (keep up morale during recruiting)
  17. 17. Teacher Confidence “I think DCCE definitely did help [me feel more confident]. I think it was just being a part of a community of teachers that you can actually talk with about teaching. That gives you confidence when you don’t teach it in a vacuum.”
  18. 18. Story 2: Defining CS Teacher Identity In the US, a teacher’s identity is defined by their teaching certificate. • What does the state say that the teacher should teach? But few states offer a CS teaching certificate How do US teachers develop a sense of identity as CS teachers? • Lijun Ni’s dissertation work 18
  19. 19. CS Teacher Identity Construct (Luehmann, 2007; Martin, 2000; Pennington, 2002) Belonging/ Affiliation Identity as a Computer Science Teacher Self-Identification Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Interest/value of Teaching CS Community/Sense of Belonging Learning/Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching
  20. 20. Research Agenda  Data Collection:Interviewing Participants: 9 CS teachers in Atlanta (Fall 2009) Varied educational background and certificate Varied teaching context: school size, students Analysis Self-identification Three dimensions of CS teacher identity Identity formation
  21. 21. Participant Background Teacher Educational Background Certificate Alex Electrical Engineering Management Technology Education Business Education Becky Computer Information Systems (CIS) Business Education Bob CIS, Math Education Technology Education Business Education Ryan Political Science, Leadership N/A Cindy Math Education Math Education John CS and Math, Math Education Math Education Pat Business Business Education May Management, Elementary Education Business Education Rose Business Education Business Education
  22. 22. Findings: CS Teacher Identity Struggling CS teachers with varied self-identifications – Computing/CS teacher Alex, Becky, Bob, Ryan – CS & Math teacher, Math & CS teacher, Business & CS teacher Cindy, John, Pat – Business teacher Mary, Rose Varied identity features Identity as a Computer Science Teacher Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Identity as a Computer Science Teacher Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching
  23. 23. Findings: CS Teacher Identity Computing/programming/CS teacher – CS defined as problem-solving with computers – Commitment: Not convinced that CS is secure [Alex]: “High schools are much more interested in the core subjects, which have the Georgia High School Graduation test…So, I just took the Math test because I wanted to make sure that I could find a job in a school that I might want to go to.” – Confidence: Felt challenged [Becky]: “It is hard to teach. It’s hard knowing how to teach it, how to give it to them… It’s hard to explain… I would have to definitely update my skills… I have to study it just like [students] do.”
  24. 24. Summarizing Findings: CS Teacher Identity Teachers currently teaching (mainly) CS do not necessarily see themselves CS teachers. Varied identity features – Valued teaching computing • Confused about the definition of CS/computing – Not confident in teaching CS – Not seeking learning opportunities – Not committed to teaching CS – Isolated, lack of community Identity as a Computer Science Teacher Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Identity as a Computer Science Teacher Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching Belonging/ Affiliation Belonging/ Affiliation Self-IdentificationSelf-Identification Motivation and Commitment Motivation and Commitment Attitudes and Values Attitudes and Values Confidence in Teaching CS Confidence in Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Values of Teaching CS Sense of Belonging Sense of Belonging Strives to Teach well Strives to Teach well Retention in CS Teaching Retention in CS Teaching
  25. 25. Findings: Self-Reported Influencing Factors  Four main factors  Educational background and certification  CS curriculum and department hierarchy  Availability of CS teacher community  Perceptions about the field of CS
  26. 26. Findings: Influencing Factors  Educational background &Teaching certificate [Rose]: “Really my degree is not in Computer Science. It’s in Business Education. So, that’s just my identity.” [Mary]: “Even though most of the courses I teach are Computer Science, I always say I’m a Business Education teacher. That’s what I’m certified for.”  Availability of CS Teacher Community [Cindy]: “I don’t have many colleagues in the county that I can turn to… I don’t feel like there are… I’ve sat and I’ve talked to people… They all have their own way of wanting to do things [in CS]… We have a lot of people who are Business teachers with no idea what they’re doing with this class.”
  27. 27. Findings: Influencing Factors  CS Curriculum and Department Hierarchy [Pat]: “One of the biggest problems I see is that Computer Science has been lumped in with Business Education and many of these teachers want nothing to do with Computer Science, consider it too hard to learn, don't have the background to be effective in it, and want to go back to keyboarding and computer applications. They hurt the program because they "have" to teach CS.”  Teachers’ Perceptions of the Subject (CS)  The definition of CS influences the values of CS  The evolving nature causes challenges for teaching CS
  28. 28. Findings: Influencing Factors  Teachers’ Perceptions of the Subject (CS)  Definition of CS/Computing [Mary]: “Computer science is more for really, really smart people.”  The evolving nature causes challenges for teaching CS [Ryan]: “Honestly, the most difficult thing I’ve had, with at least my journey, has been when machines don’t quite handle the software interface and it changes… Also [I had] some issues with [programming] language and paradigm shifts when it went from procedural to object-oriented…That would have been probably better done if I had initiated more contact with other teachers and had a group to work with.”
  29. 29. Changing what we can 29  Of the four main factors:  Educational background and certification: State policy.  CS curriculum and department hierarchy: State policy.  Availability of CS teacher community  Perceptions about the field of CS
  30. 30. Story #3: Teaching CS Teachers online 30 We had a six-year effort to provide in-service teacher professional development in-person. • $6M USD • Reached 36% of schools in Georgia. Can we reach more online, by emphasizing the skills and knowledge of successful CS teachers? What makes a CS teacher successful? Success defined as: • Recruits more students into CS • High pass rate • Confident and satisfied with teaching CS
  31. 31. A successful CS teacher… 31 • Writes assignments and comments, not code. • Guides students through rubrics. • Focus on learning activities (coding away from the computer, explaining). • Minimal focus on assessment. How do we teach that online?
  32. 32. How do we teach working high school teachers online? Study of adult/professional students in CS classes (i.e., apprenticeship-model). – They don’t have the time to spend hours in front of the IDE. – Lacking background, e.g., in mathematics. – They get stymied by small errors. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, Dec 2012
  33. 33. Need a different model
  34. 34. An Ebook for Teaching CS Teachers
  35. 35. Why Ebooks over MOOCS MOOCs put lectures (time-based) on-line. – Our teachers fit the demographic of MOOC non-completers. Ebooks can fit into a teacher’s pace. Our Ebooks are designed to be efficient for learning what the teachers need to be successful and confident. – Maximum of learning in time allotted
  36. 36. Principled Ebook Design Lower cognitive load – Keep the germane. Reduce the extrinsic (e.g., programming language details, authentic development tools). (Sweller) Use Multimodality. – Use audio to increase comprehension of complex visuals (Mayer). Worked examples plus practice. – Working examples can be more efficient for learning than more problem-solving (Sweller & Cooper). – Interleaving examples + practice is even better (Trafton & Reiser).
  37. 37. Demo here Or video if Internet fails
  38. 38. ActiveCode Execute code in the browser Can edit the code Results are displayed
  39. 39. Code Visualization Step through the code Displays variable and object values Shows program output
  40. 40. Low cognitive load programming activities We know that the cost of an erroneous semi-colon in Java is typically 30 minutes of debugging for first semester students (Jadud, 2006). Parson’s Problems are low cognitive-load programming activities, that correlate with program-writing tasks (Denny, Luxton-Reilly, Simon, 2008)
  41. 41. Parsons Problems Drag and drop code blocks in correct order Bank of code blocks Feedback on order and indention
  42. 42. CS PCK Pedagogical Content Knowledge – What are the learning difficulties that teachers might anticipate? – What are useful techniques for teaching this?
  43. 43. Social Pressure at Teacher Pace Support for reading groups, who collaboratively negotiate a schedule.
  44. 44. Summary: Designing for high school teachers as CS learners • Tools that are accessible, not authentic. • Low cognitive load activities for deliberate practice. • Scaffolding that makes learning efficient. • Respecting their time constraints. • Supporting groups and communities of practice. • Provide access to the information that teachers want. • Programming and PCK
  45. 45. Findings: What do users do in ebook?
  46. 46. Conclusions How we provide opportunities to in-service teachers for reflection with feedback? • Disciplinary Commons for Computing Education provides one model with an emphasis on community. How do we influence the development of CS teacher identity? • The important factors we can influence are (a) a teacher community and (b) clear definitions of what is CS. How do we provide Computer Science and Computer Science PCK learning opportunities in-service? • We are building and testing an ebook to meet teachers’ needs. 46
  47. 47. Many thanks! Colleagues: Barbara Ericson, Tom McKlin, Lijun Ni, & Briana Morrison Our Funders: US National Science Foundation – Statewide BPC Alliance: Project “Georgia Computes!” http://www.gacomputes.org – Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance, http://expandingcomputing.org – CCLI and CPATH Grants, and now CE21 to produce new media Georgia’s Department of Education GVU Center, and Institute for People and Technology (iPaT) at Georgia Tech
  48. 48. Thank you! http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~mark.guzdial – Lab: http://home.cc.gatech.edu/csl – Ebook Access: http://ebooks.cc.gatech.edu/TeachCSP-Python Institute for Computing Education at Georgia Tech: – http://coweb.cc.gatech.edu/ice-gt

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