Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns
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Cut Through the Noise: Create Conversations, Not Campaigns

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Nobody wants to get blasted. Think back to the last marketing email you received that was irrelevant to you. Wasn't it frustrating? Popular marketing expressions such as "batch and blast" and "hit the database" admit that your emails are not individualized or relevant to specific buyer behavior. What good are they, then?

Join this thought-provoking webinar with Matt Zilli, Sr. Product Marketing Manager at Marketo, to discover how to drive better results through more engaging marketing. You will learn:
• What an engaging conversation looks like
• How dialogues with your buyers are created
• How to use behavioral and demographic information to target buyers
• Why traditional tools just don't cut it
• Much more!

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  • So how are we responding to this? Not good.So between the marketers that are still batching and blasting, or sending personalized messages that aren’t relevant right now, this is kind of what it feels like to be a consumer today.  On any given day, the average customer will be exposed to 2,904 media messages, will pay attention to 52 and will positively remember 4 – SuperProfile 2010  
  • We’re bad at this. And here’sproof.
  • The answer: our communicationsmust be more trusted, more relevant, and more strategic. It must be more engaging.  Traditional batch and blast feels like shouting, engagement marketing feels more like a natural conversation. Notice how these women are engaged in conversation. There’s talking, but also listening going on. And the conversation, at least by the looks of it, seems to have a flow to it. [Refer back to this throughout the presentation: how important it is to effectively listen to online body language.]
  • Short history of email:Commercial email first evolved from a traditional direct mail mindset: lists, promotions, offers. Big campaigns. Send the same message frequently and rapidly to many. 1-2% response rates. Sent on your schedule, not theirs. One of email’s biggest “benefits” was its low cost compared to direct mail. But email was too easy. When companies combined the ease of sending large quantities emails with the low cost of doing so, it resulted in a recipe for a sender's dream but a receiver's nightmare. “Batch and blast” was off and running.But the problem was this: Nobody wants to get “blasted”.Think of the word blast....what do you imagine? It's a shotgun. Wide pattern, random spread, unfocused (for the most part) and an imprecise tool whose end result is one that sometimes leaves more damage than any benefit you might have gained. .. It hurts. Casualty of war.Terms like “hit the database” or “e-shot” are just as bad.
  • The key to relevance is behavioral targeting.So you want relevancy and engagement – but this requires sophisticated targeting that combines online body language (web traffic, search behavior, email response) plus transactional data plus with lifestyle and demographic data (personas)When behavioral cues are not used, email can be experienced as a dissonant interruption. What the sender considers a coordinated "drip campaign" may feel more like water torture to the receiver.
  • Result: Big lift!More on our blog about this: http://blog.marketo.com/blog/2013/06/topic-of-interest-based-nurturing.html
  • While this may be straightforward for programmers, it’s a foreign language to most marketers…This makes the marketer reliant on technical resources for anything that’s not simple, especially anything that incorporates behaviors beyond email open and click
  • Every interaction is a link within the context of a communication supply chain.Don’t look at each discrete message, or even each campaign, as a unique event. Marketing is not a candy machine.
  • ----“'Sense and respond’ communication in the digital world requires automation that monitors for explicit and implicit behavioral cues, captures that data (senses) in a rich behavioral database, and then uses the data to customize a valuable response (responds). ----------------------A romantic date goes badly if all you do is talk about yourself. The same holds true for marketing conversations. If you don’t listen — really listen — to your prospects and consumers, you’ll never earn the chance for a “second date,” let alone a long-term commitment. To start a two-way conversation, you must provide content relevant to a consumer’s interests. Then, you must be willing to adjust your content based on how that consumer responds. It’s great to automate workflows that map to a buyer’s journey, but they can’t be static workflows; you must be willing to adjust them as you observe how your buyer actually navigates across channels. Here’s how to listen and adapt in email marketing:Use behavioral filters to target. As discussed in Part 3, behavioral filters ensure relevance in your email marketing. So, start a conversation with a smart subset of your contact list based on unique profiles and behaviors. Then, continue to watch your subscribers’ behaviors as the campaign progresses and your conversation with each recipient diverges down its own unique behavioral path. Trigger messages and adjustments based on behaviors.When a prospect does something meaningful on your website, in social channels, or offline (such as making a purchase at a physical store), you need to be able to respond with a relevant, timely email. When you automatically send a prospect a message based on an action she took (or didn’t take), you allow for the message to be delivered at the moment your brand is on her mind. You are communicating with her on her terms, not yours. But if you miss these triggers, and simply blast emails to your entire list as your promotional calendar dictates, you ignore your potential customers and their buying signals.
  • This is more like what you want your communications to be….
  • You think it’s easy, draw a simple diagram on the whiteboard
  • But the real world is not that simple. Real conversations are not that simple. Buyers do things you don’t expect. You can’t “script out” the buyer’s process, or the entire conversation. You wouldn’t show up at a cocktail party with everything you were going to say scripted out into simple “if-then” branches. You quickly see that “flow chart” like solutions are inflexible, and difficult to setup and manage. Lots of use cases to worry about.What is prospect does something?---Hard to use: The complexity makes them usable only for serious technical experts. As David Raab, marketing technology expert and consultant says, “I never saw a flow chart interface that actually did a good job handling complexity. So I've reluctantly concluded that flow charts are only suitable for serious technical experts.”Less agile. When you need to rewire complex flow-charts, it can take seemingly forever add or change the content in tracksError-prone, harder to be intelligent. The complexity of spaghetti makes it error prone. Too easy to send expired content, duplicate content, or too much content. “Why are you still sending me an invitation for a webinar from last week?” “I just downloaded this off your site 2 days ago, and now you’re sending it again!” “Do you guys realize how much you send me each day? I’ve had it!”Difficult to see who is where. It can be hard to know how many people are in any track at any given point, and even harder to see how many consumer have reached the end and “exhausted” the track. As a result, consumers may end up not getting any content unless you catch this!As a result, marketers using traditional solutions are limited in their ability to have an interactive, dynamic and customized dialog with prospects and customers. Quote: “My own opinion is quite firm: flow charts don't work. They look good in demonstrations and can lay out simple processes quite nicely. But they get impossibly convoluted once you try to do something complex.” - David Raab, marketing technology consultant and analyst
  • Today’s consumers move seamlessly across digital and offline channels. According to a recent Experian QAS® survey, 36 percent of U.S. organizations interact with customers and prospects in five or more channels.In retail banking, 61% of consumers use three or more channels each month (e.g. branch, phone, online, and mobile – in addition to email). However, Companies Not Prepared to Deliver Integrated ExperiencesQUOTE: “Fewer than 10 percent of brands are executing true cross-channel communications informed by one view of the customer.” - The 2013 Digital Marketer, Experian = Big opportunity to increase relevancy.Organization silos:Traditionally, marketing organizations are made up of either product or channel teams. Within this structure, each team works hard to optimize their siloed marketing efforts — and, in most places, have gotten really good at delivering their individual marketing programs and defending their individual marketing budgetsTechnology silos: Many of the tools are focused on a channel — email, mobile, catalog or Web. The big challenge for marketers is that message delivery within channels almost always happens via disparate platforms. Especially a problem with ESP. Email “grew up” with companies using stand-alone email service providers (ESPs) and outside agencies. This legacy hangs over email today. Traditional email service providers (ESP) = not multi-channel, not channel agnosticThe modern, digitally-empowered consumer doesn’t think in terms of channels and doesn’t care about your silos.Uses whatever device they have in the moment… web, mobile, tabletSo, companies shouldn’t expect the consumer to adapt; companies should adapt. This means moving from channel- or promotion-centric marketing plans to customer-centric marketing plans, and enabling those plans with marketing technology that is ready to deliver.
  • Many marketers are perceived as a cost center. You can’t expect your organization to place value on something you’re unable to quantify. But when you do use the right metrics and processes, there is nothing more powerful to help marketing earn it’s rightful seat at the revenue table.Here I show you how Marketo does it.
  • Some basic metrics. Test for what works for you! (DJ talks about this also.)But… doesn’t really tell you what’s causing engagement. If you’re like most marketers, you’re likely wading through many different email performance metrics trying to determine the impact of your content…. Email A got opened, but email B was clicked, and email C drove conversions… which is best?
  • Engagement Score enables marketers to quickly judge how effectively each piece of content is engaging prospects and customers over time. This proprietary metric takes many factors into consideration, and outputs a single number that gives marketers a fast, apples-to-apples method of measuring content performance…See trend over time, how updates to program improve engagement.
  • Multiple touches. Seven touches needed to convert a cold lead into a saleMultiple influencers. Typical buying committee has 5-21 people
  • Here we see what works for Marketo over the last 12 months to generate prospects. Explain columns…Website+Blog = 38% of all oppsBut I’d be a bad stock picker if I put all my money in one stock, and I’d be a bad marketer if I bet all my prospect generation on one source. The reality is you need a portfolio of prospects and channels to achieve the best results. In fact, Marketo runs an average of 40 different Prospect generating programs each and every month across all these sources.
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