Library Facelift: Syncing LibrarySignage with a College’s New BrandAmy F. Stempler, Assistant ProfessorCoordinator of Libr...
Agenda• Introduction• Background• Determining Signs by Content and Mounting Method• Determining "Decision Points"• The Pro...
The CollegeThe College of Staten Island (hereafter CSI)• Four-year, senior college of the City University of New York (her...
The Library• The Library is housed in the 1L Building, which also occupies the CyberCafé, Academic Support, the Social Wor...
Background: Signage AuditIn 2012, we conducted an audit of signs produced in-house,omitting permanent, institutionally-pro...
Signage Audit Results• Three generations of signs were discovered. Signage wasoften outdated, and contained conflicting me...
Examples- Handwritten signs
Examples-Taped-up & taped-oversigns
Examples-Clutter and outdatedsigns
Examples-Contradictory signs
Step 1: Assess, Remove,ReplaceStep 1:• Perform a walk-through and account for outdated and incorrectsignage• Determine dec...
Step 2: Best Practice Document• Create sample templates• Create designs for different purposes• Create signage map locator...
Signage Locator Mapping Toolentrance to librarys main floor
Signage Locator Mapping Tool
Step 3: Signage Policy 101I. Mission StatementII. Library Signage Classificationo signage message (promotional, directiona...
Step 3: Signage Policy 101IV. Requesting Library Signage1. Signage Request: Any staff or faculty member may fill out a sig...
Step 4: Designate a Signage ContactDuties include:• Perform an audit at the beginning and end of each semesterto account f...
Step 5: Mounting and Placement• Avoid visible tape• Avoid placing signs over older signs• Avoid taping on walls and furnit...
Step 6: Workflow ManagementCreate a workflow to:• Confirm temporary (time-sensitive) signs areappropriately removed• Ensur...
Conclusion• Document guidelines and policies• Make templates available• Advocate that signage be on the departmental agend...
Lmi summer conference  june 3-4
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Lmi summer conference june 3-4

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Lmi summer conference june 3-4

  1. 1. Library Facelift: Syncing LibrarySignage with a College’s New BrandAmy F. Stempler, Assistant ProfessorCoordinator of Library InstructionCollege of Staten IslandCity University of New YorkAmy.Stempler@csi.cuny.eduMark Aaron Polger, Assistant ProfessorInstruction/Reference LibrarianCollege of Staten IslandCity University of New YorkMarkAaron.Polger@csi.cuny.edu
  2. 2. Agenda• Introduction• Background• Determining Signs by Content and Mounting Method• Determining "Decision Points"• The Process of Replacing Temporary Signs• Best Practice Guidelines Document
  3. 3. The CollegeThe College of Staten Island (hereafter CSI)• Four-year, senior college of the City University of New York (hereafter CUNY)• Established in 1976 from merger of Richmond College (1965) and Staten IslandCommunity College (1956)• CSI offers programs in the liberal arts and sciences leading to degrees from theassociate to graduate level• CSI moved to the grounds of the former Willowbrook State School in 1993
  4. 4. The Library• The Library is housed in the 1L Building, which also occupies the CyberCafé, Academic Support, the Social Work Program, the Faculty Center,Computer Labs, and a Public Safety satellite office• The 30,000 square foot, three-floor Library features a large rotunda leadingto a dome in the ceiling. There are computers on all floors, though printersand photocopies are only on the first two, as the third floor is designated asa silent flooro First floor: Circulation/Reserves Desk, Reference Desk and ReferenceArea, and administrative officeso Second floor: Library Learning Lab, Archives & Special Collections,group study rooms, K-12 Text Collection, and additional office spaceo Third floor: Circulating book collection, printed periodicals, individualstudy carrels, and reading alcoves
  5. 5. Background: Signage AuditIn 2012, we conducted an audit of signs produced in-house,omitting permanent, institutionally-produced signs.We evaluated:• language• branding• design• ADA compliance• consistency• placement
  6. 6. Signage Audit Results• Three generations of signs were discovered. Signage wasoften outdated, and contained conflicting messages andvarious designs• Signs were classified into three typologieso policyo informational (promotional)o directional• Signs were assigned three mediumso permanento in-house
  7. 7. Examples- Handwritten signs
  8. 8. Examples-Taped-up & taped-oversigns
  9. 9. Examples-Clutter and outdatedsigns
  10. 10. Examples-Contradictory signs
  11. 11. Step 1: Assess, Remove,ReplaceStep 1:• Perform a walk-through and account for outdated and incorrectsignage• Determine decision points for replacement• Remove and replace strategicallyo Replace with more meaningful (and less) signso Add bulletin boards and large postered signageo Avoid clutter 1st floor, informational and policy signs 2nd floor, mostly policy and some informational signs 3rd floor, mostly policy, some informational and fewdirectional signs
  12. 12. Step 2: Best Practice Document• Create sample templates• Create designs for different purposes• Create signage map locator• Create signage policy• Assign signage contacts• Adhere to ADA compliance• Create a thesaurus for consistent language• Gather feedback from colleagues and patrons• Re-visit signs regularly
  13. 13. Signage Locator Mapping Toolentrance to librarys main floor
  14. 14. Signage Locator Mapping Tool
  15. 15. Step 3: Signage Policy 101I. Mission StatementII. Library Signage Classificationo signage message (promotional, directional, policy)o signage type (temporary, in-house, permanent)III. Design Checklist1. Consistency2. Font type3. Font color3. Sign orientation4. Branding5. Language6. Tone (is it punitive?)7. Visuals (photos)8. PlacementElements of a Signage Policy
  16. 16. Step 3: Signage Policy 101IV. Requesting Library Signage1. Signage Request: Any staff or faculty member may fill out a sign request.2. Signage Approval: All requests are forwarded to the Chief Librarian and thedesignated signage contact person. Requests must be approved by the ChiefLibrarian and will be prioritized by the following criteria:a. Time sensitive events (Library events or programs)b. Policy or directional additions or revisionsV. Installation of Signs1. Permanent SignsAll permanent signs may be requested through the Chief Librarian. A permanent signrequest form will be made available through the Library’s Intranet Web Site.1. In-house SignsIn-house signs may be requested by contacting the designated signage person. Atemporary signage request form will be made available through the Library’s Intranet.Elements of a Signage Policy
  17. 17. Step 4: Designate a Signage ContactDuties include:• Perform an audit at the beginning and end of each semesterto account for currency and accuracy of signs• Prepare reports for the Chief Librarian and update colleaguesat Department Meetings• Evaluates and revises best practice guidelines
  18. 18. Step 5: Mounting and Placement• Avoid visible tape• Avoid placing signs over older signs• Avoid taping on walls and furniture. Instead, strategicallyplaced bulletin boards and plastic holders are recommended• To prevent glare, avoid lamination and placement under directlight• Consult the signage map to keep track of location
  19. 19. Step 6: Workflow ManagementCreate a workflow to:• Confirm temporary (time-sensitive) signs areappropriately removed• Ensure that signs have not been vandalized,damaged, moved, or lost• Schedule regular signage updates
  20. 20. Conclusion• Document guidelines and policies• Make templates available• Advocate that signage be on the departmental agenda• Accept that departmental buy-in may take time• Budget: Even in-house signage has costs• Signs are living documents

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