D A T A A N D R E L A T E D S E R V I C E P R O V I D E R S
Special Education PD #3
1
Looking back on our last Sped. PD
We Reviewed…
1. special education laws
2. Protocols to follow when a child is suspected ...
If your child was in the
classroom, what best practices
would you like to see?
What steps would you
take, if your child is...
4
If your child was in the
classroom, what best
practices would you like to
see
What steps would you
take, if your child is
...
Does your academic
expectation changed?
Does your ability to understand
the child emotionally changed?
6
Now imagine that ...
If your child was in the
classroom, what best practices
would you like to see?
What steps would you
take, if your child is...
1. Activity
2. Teacher survey results
3. Understanding the special education population at
Plasencia
4. Who is responsible...
Teacher Survey Results
 #1 Survey  Comment Box
Question 1- Comments:
 Comment 1: “depending on the disability”
 Commen...
Teacher Survey Results
 #2 Survey  #3 Survey
Strongly
Agree
23%
Agree
40%
No Answer
27%
Do not
agree
10%
I am aware of s...
Teacher Survey Results
 #4 Survey  #5 Survey
Strongly
Agree
20%
Agree
56%
No Answer
17%
Do not agree
7%
I am aware of in...
Teacher Survey Results
 #6 Survey  #7 Survey
Strongly
Agree
21%
Agree
31%
No Answer
31%
Do not agree
17%
I have consider...
Teacher Survey Results
 #8 Survey  #9 Survey
Strongly
Agree
6%
Agree
0%
No Answer
7%
Do not agree
87%
I think that stude...
 #10 Survey  Question 10~
50% disagreed to having
insufficient knowledge to
teaching students with
disabilities in the g...
Plasencia ES Special Education Population
 Welligent and My data were utilized to attain data
15
Questions to ask ourselves(Special ed. students in this report are the students from the general ed. Classroom)
1. Common ...
A) Majority of the students in special ed. have SLD
Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth G...
B) There are currently 24 students with SLD
(numbers are always changing/increasing)
Specific Learning
Disability
Specific...
C) Majority of special ed. Students are in
kindergarten and 5th grade
Kindergarten
21%
First Grade
19%
Second Grade
15%
Th...
D) Majority of the Special ed. Population are
serviced by the RSP and speech teachers
Kindergarten First Grade Second Grad...
E) 47% of special ed. Students are receiving services
from the RSP teachers
Resource Specialist
Program
47%
Speech
29%
Cou...
Service providers
22
Mr. Sanchez – APEIS
Mrs. Taylor – SDC (ID) upper grade
Mr. Duarte – SDC (ID) lower grade
Ms. Young – ...
23
Mr. Sanchez - APEIS
24
 Supervise special education department
 IDEA compliance – Notifications, involving
parents, righ...
Ms. Contreras
Ms. Temores
25
Ms. Contreras Ms. Temores
1. Assess students
2. Counsel students
3. Role is federally mandated
by student’s IEP
4. Counsel...
Ms. Kwon – Speech (amy.kwon@lausd.net)
27
Speech Therapist Input: Ms. Kwon
Who is eligible?
A student with a Speech Language Impairment is
defined as a pupil who ha...
Speech: Who qualifies?
29
Children 3 - 22 years of age who meet criteria for
special education services may be eligible fo...
Speech students qualify in 1 or more of the
following categories
30
 What is School-Based Speech Therapy?
 School-based ...
What are some red flags that would trigger a
speech assessment
By age 3 cannot By age 4 cannot By age 5 cannot
be understo...
Speech Intervention
33
articulation Language- Receptive, Expressive,
Social Pragmatic
Play activities which include:
sound...
Facilitating Language Development
1. Modeling
2. Expansion
3. Self talk
4. Parallel
Pls. take a minute and examine the spe...
Ms. Manning – OT
(fidesmarie.manning@lausd.net))
35
Occupational Therapist Input: Ms. Manning
1. What is occupational therapy?
 OT is a skilled treatment that allows student...
Occupational Therapist Input: Ms. Manning
37
 Fine Motor Skills: skills used when you move your hand to do an activity. G...
OT: Fine and Visual Motor Dev. Milestones (Pls.
take a minute and look at the OT packet)
38
Between Ages Three
and Four
Be...
OT: Fine and Visual Motor Dev. Milestones
(Pls. take a minute and look at the OT packet)
39
Between Ages Seven and Ten Ten...
OT: Play Milestones
(Pls. take a minute and look at the OT packet)
40
Between Ages Three
and Four
Between Ages Four
and Fi...
Red Flags
41
 5-6 year olds:
 immature pencil/crayon grasp,
 unable to hold/manipulate scissors
 difficulty transition...
OT: Interventions/teaching strategies
42
 Doing work on a vertical surface to increase shoulder
stability and strengthen ...
OT: Interventions/teaching strategies
43
4-5 5-6 6+
animal walks(crawling,
creeping, crabwalk,
wheelbarrow), playing or
re...
 I have all the documents in PDF and will be more
than happy to e-mail resources to teachers.
Marisa.barba@lausd.net
Pd 3 only: Best Practices in the Classroom & Service Providers
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Pd 3 only: Best Practices in the Classroom & Service Providers

  1. 1. D A T A A N D R E L A T E D S E R V I C E P R O V I D E R S Special Education PD #3 1
  2. 2. Looking back on our last Sped. PD We Reviewed… 1. special education laws 2. Protocols to follow when a child is suspected of having a learning disability (RTI model) 3. long lasting effects of having a special education label 4. Acceleration model for students with disabilities 2
  3. 3. If your child was in the classroom, what best practices would you like to see? What steps would you take, if your child is having emotional issues? 3 Activity
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. If your child was in the classroom, what best practices would you like to see What steps would you take, if your child is having emotional issues?  Lots of kinesthetic activities  Activities – projects (PBL)  Small groups teaching  Pre-teaching  Re-teaching  Communication with parents  Materials that will challenge their thinking  Manipulative  Engaged!!! Loving teacher!!!  Talk to them  Communicate with parents  Referral to counseling  Books/activities that will cope with issues  Sincerity :) 5 Activity Model
  6. 6. Does your academic expectation changed? Does your ability to understand the child emotionally changed? 6 Now imagine that your precious child has been diagnosed with….
  7. 7. If your child was in the classroom, what best practices would you like to see? What steps would you take, if your child is having emotional issues?  Same as the 1st box  Appropriate services  Getting their services  Communication!!!  Informal meetings  Loving teacher!!  Same as the first box  Students not bullying the child  Equipped appropriate social skills  Have adults that they can turn to – feel safe  Provide them opportunities to talk  Counseling if needed 7 Kylie, Tricia, Eli, Ayden – Diagnosed with Autism at LBUSD
  8. 8. 1. Activity 2. Teacher survey results 3. Understanding the special education population at Plasencia 4. Who is responsible for servicing the students? What is related services? 8
  9. 9. Teacher Survey Results  #1 Survey  Comment Box Question 1- Comments:  Comment 1: “depending on the disability”  Comment 2: “consider severity of the behavior, because other students will have a hard time focusing”  Comment 3: “with support”  Comment 4: “what is the disability?”  Comment 5: “with a behavioral support”  Comment 6: “with a one to one, depending on the disability”  Comment 7: “It depends on the child's ability to obtain the curriculum  Comment 8: “Yes, except when his/her behavior impedes progress of others” Strongly Agree 17% Agree 59% No Answer 10% Do not agree 14% I believe that students with disabilities should be educated in the gen. ed classroom. Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree 9
  10. 10. Teacher Survey Results  #2 Survey  #3 Survey Strongly Agree 23% Agree 40% No Answer 27% Do not agree 10% I am aware of special ed. laws such as IDEA, LRE, Section 504 of Rehab. Act Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree Strongly Agree 27% Agree 67% No Answer 3% Do not agree 3% I am aware of inclusion Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree 10
  11. 11. Teacher Survey Results  #4 Survey  #5 Survey Strongly Agree 20% Agree 56% No Answer 17% Do not agree 7% I am aware of inclusion practices for students with disabilities in the gen. class. Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree Strongly Agree 40% Agree 40% No Answer 20% Do not agree 0% I implement accomodations/modifications in the gen. ed. classroom in accordance to their IEP. Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree 11
  12. 12. Teacher Survey Results  #6 Survey  #7 Survey Strongly Agree 21% Agree 31% No Answer 31% Do not agree 17% I have considered co-teaching with a special ed. teacher in math, lang. arts or both. Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree Strongly Agree 41% Agree 52% No Answer 4% Do not agree 3% I believe that students with disabilities should receive services both in and outside the classroom. Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree 12
  13. 13. Teacher Survey Results  #8 Survey  #9 Survey Strongly Agree 6% Agree 0% No Answer 7% Do not agree 87% I think that students with disabilities should only receive services outside the classroom. Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree Strongly Agree 30% Agree 37% No Answer 30% Do not agree 3% I utilize service providers such as (AP, RSP, Psych., etc.) for students with disabilities in the gen. ed. classroom in order to learn about the disability and unique needs. Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree 13
  14. 14.  #10 Survey  Question 10~ 50% disagreed to having insufficient knowledge to teaching students with disabilities in the general education classroom. This data is crucial to my leadership project because this information serves as one of the main reasons as to why increasing awareness about inclusion needs to be urgently addressed. Pink: Strongly agree, Yellow: Agree Blue: No Answer, Brown: Do not agree Strongly Agree 7% Agree 33% No Answer 13% Do not agree 47% I feel that I have sufficient knowledge and experience to educate students with in the classroom. Strongly Agree Agree No Answer Do not agree 14
  15. 15. Plasencia ES Special Education Population  Welligent and My data were utilized to attain data 15
  16. 16. Questions to ask ourselves(Special ed. students in this report are the students from the general ed. Classroom) 1. Common disabilities (why is it prevalent?) 2. Number of students per disability (Why is the disability common?) 3. Impacted grade levels with special education eligibilities (why are these gr. Levels impacted) 4. Special education Service Providers (who are they?) 5. Serviced population per Service Providers (who is being serviced the most & how can we help?) 6. Data from Likert Survey about special education and inclusion (Rationale for PD) 16
  17. 17. A) Majority of the students in special ed. have SLD Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade Specific Learning Disability 3 2 2 3 14 Specific Language Impairment 7 4 1 1 1 Autism 1 3 2 3 1 Other Health Impairment 2 1 Visual Impairment 1 Developmentally Delayed 3 3 2 2 3 14 7 4 1 1 11 3 2 3 1 2 11 3 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Numberofstudents withdisability ingeneraleducation Plasencia Elementary/Plasencia Magnet School Special Education Students in General Education (2013-2014) 17
  18. 18. B) There are currently 24 students with SLD (numbers are always changing/increasing) Specific Learning Disability Specific Language Impairment Autism Other Health Impairment Developmentally Delayed Visual Impairment Series1 24 14 10 3 3 1 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 NumberofStudentswith Disabilities Plasencia Elementary School/Plasencia Magnet Common Special Education Eligibilities in General Education Classroom (2013-2014) 18
  19. 19. C) Majority of special ed. Students are in kindergarten and 5th grade Kindergarten 21% First Grade 19% Second Grade 15% Third Grade 8% Fourth Grade 9% Fifth Grade 28% Plasesncia Elementary School/Plasencia Elementary Magnet School Total number of Students with Disabilities In General Education Per Grade Level (2013-2014) 19
  20. 20. D) Majority of the Special ed. Population are serviced by the RSP and speech teachers Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade Resource Specialist Program 4 6 6 7 4 11 Speech 9 6 2 4 2 1 Counseling 3 1 3 1 2 Adapted Physical Education 2 1 1 1 1 Occupational Therapy 2 1 Health/Nursing 1 4 6 6 7 4 11 9 6 2 4 2 1 3 1 3 1 22 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Numberofstudentsreceiving SpecialEducationServices Plasencia Elementary/Plasencia Magnet School Service Providers for Students with Disabilities in General Education (2013-2014) 20
  21. 21. E) 47% of special ed. Students are receiving services from the RSP teachers Resource Specialist Program 47% Speech 29% Counseling 12% Adapted Physical Education 7% Occupational Therapy 4% Health/Nursing 1% Percentage of Clients Serviced by Special Education in General Education Classroom (2013-2014) Resource Specialist Program Speech Language Impairment Counseling Adapted Physical Education Occupational Therapy Health/Nursing 21
  22. 22. Service providers 22 Mr. Sanchez – APEIS Mrs. Taylor – SDC (ID) upper grade Mr. Duarte – SDC (ID) lower grade Ms. Young – RSP Ms. Barba – RSP Ms. Kwon – Speech Ms. Manning – Occupational Therapy Ms. Chezek – APE –Adaptive Physical Education
  23. 23. 23
  24. 24. Mr. Sanchez - APEIS 24  Supervise special education department  IDEA compliance – Notifications, involving parents, rights, etc.  IEP/SST meetings  Para-educators  PD  Work with general/special ed. teachers
  25. 25. Ms. Contreras Ms. Temores 25
  26. 26. Ms. Contreras Ms. Temores 1. Assess students 2. Counsel students 3. Role is federally mandated by student’s IEP 4. Counseling by her requires IEP documentation 5. Counseling related to helping students access curriculum in the classroom 6. If cases are too high risk based on student information/background she may need to refer out 1. Counsel students, even without IEP documentation 2. Links outside resources to students/families 3. Can be called out for crisis in neighboring schools 4. Counseling students does not have to relate to accessing curriculum in the classroom 5. Pertinent to school community because services does not have to be prescriptive through federal mandates and bridges community to school resources Mental Health Services 26
  27. 27. Ms. Kwon – Speech (amy.kwon@lausd.net) 27
  28. 28. Speech Therapist Input: Ms. Kwon Who is eligible? A student with a Speech Language Impairment is defined as a pupil who has been "assessed as having a language or speech disorder which makes him or her eligible for special education and related services when he or she demonstrates difficulty understanding or using spoken language to such an extent that it adversely affects his or her educational performance and cannot be corrected without special education and related services" 28
  29. 29. Speech: Who qualifies? 29 Children 3 - 22 years of age who meet criteria for special education services may be eligible for Language and Speech (LAS) services. School-based Speech Pathologists share in the decision-making process with the IEP team to determine how to best meet the educational needs of individual students.
  30. 30. Speech students qualify in 1 or more of the following categories 30  What is School-Based Speech Therapy?  School-based speech therapy is a related service that supports the educational program
for students who have a disorder in communication in one or more of the following areas:  Articulation: The production of speech sounds significantly interferes with communication and attracts adverse attention.  Language: Inappropriate or inadequate acquisition, comprehension or expression of spoken language.  Fluency: Difficulties which result in the abnormal flow of verbal expression to such a degree that they adversely affect communication.  Voice: A voice that is characterized by persistent, defective vocal quality, pitch or loudness.
  31. 31. What are some red flags that would trigger a speech assessment By age 3 cannot By age 4 cannot By age 5 cannot be understood by family and/or caregivers correctly produce vowels and such sounds as p, b, m, w in words repeat when not understood without becoming frustrated be understood by individuals with whom they do not associate regularly be understood by family and/or caregivers correctly produce t, d, k, g, f be asked to repeat without becoming sensitive be understood in all situations by most listeners correctly produce most speech sounds be asked to repeat without exhibiting frustration
  32. 32. Speech Intervention 33 articulation Language- Receptive, Expressive, Social Pragmatic Play activities which include: sound awareness and discrimination, songs, stories and games that emphasize letter sounds Identify a "target sound of the week." Find objects that begin with the sound, make a sound book with pictures, and listen for the sound when reading stories. Talk to your student about everything you do together. Encourage students to tell you what they want rather than anticipating their needs Gain students' attention and have child repeat directions to check for understanding Break instructions into smaller parts to assure comprehension Make connections in every aspect of your child's life for understanding of new vocabulary Minimize interruptions, competition and a barrage of questions Consult with the school nurse about possible medical concerns. Provide opportunities for the student to speak in a normal voice tone, minimizing situations where he or she will shout or scream
  33. 33. Facilitating Language Development 1. Modeling 2. Expansion 3. Self talk 4. Parallel Pls. take a minute and examine the speech packet
  34. 34. Ms. Manning – OT (fidesmarie.manning@lausd.net)) 35
  35. 35. Occupational Therapist Input: Ms. Manning 1. What is occupational therapy?  OT is a skilled treatment that allows student’s the ability to function and access their educational environment with as much independence as possible.  The areas addressed by a school-based occupational therapist must directly relate to the child’s performance within their school setting (campus, classroom, playground, cafeteria, bathroo m and library). 36
  36. 36. Occupational Therapist Input: Ms. Manning 37  Fine Motor Skills: skills used when you move your hand to do an activity. Gross Motor Skills: Coordinated body movements involving large muscle groups. Activities involving this skill include running, walking, hopping, climbing, throwing and jumping.  Visual Motor Skills: Ability to visually take in info, process it and be able to coordinate your physical movement in relation to what has been viewed. It involves combination of visual perception and motor coordination.  Oral Motor Skills: Movement of the muscles of the face particularly the mouth, jaw, tongue and lips which can affect speech and feeding skills. Feeding skills are typically addressed in clinic settings and not in school- based settings.  Self-Care Skills: In the school-based setting, it is the ability to perform skills such as washing and drying hands, putting away backpack, accessing compartments of backpack, handling lunch tray, managing clothing for bathroom use.  Sensory Integration: Ability to receive, process and act upon sensory input for “use”. This “use” may be a perception, an adaptive response or a learning process.  Motor Planning Skills: Ability to have an idea, plan an action and execute the action necessary for a completion of a new motor skills.  Neuromotor Skills: Skills that look at one’s neuromuscular structure such as balance, posture, muscle tone and strength and how that affects one’s gross and fine motor skills. A person with balance and postural issues will have more fine and gross motor skill issues.
  37. 37. OT: Fine and Visual Motor Dev. Milestones (Pls. take a minute and look at the OT packet) 38 Between Ages Three and Four Between Ages Four and Five Between Ages Five and Six Buttons in less than 30 seconds Touches finger to thumb quickly Dresses and undresses without assistance, begins to tie shoes Unbuttons (simple fasteners) quickly Colors between lines Prints some letters Draws a person - 3 body parts Draws person with face with mouth, nose and eyes Draws a person with 6 body parts Builds tower of six cubes then a wall with 4 blocks Builds steps with blocks, then a pyramid Builds 5 block bridge (from model) Imitates vertical crayon stroke; copies circle and then a cross Copies square Copies a triangle Traces a line Connects 2 dots Prints some letters, copies first name (may have reversals, large letters) Grasps marker with thumb and index finger moving hand as a unit Holds crayon well Mature tripod/functional grasp Cuts 8.5 x 11 in paper in half then cuts on curved line Uses scissors Cuts out complex pictures following outlines Laces string into 3 holes/strings beads Cuts a large circle, then cuts a square within 1/4" of line Cuts cloth and other material Puts together simple (straight line, 3-piece or insert puzzle) Completes puzzle to 20 pieces Puts together complex/interlocking puzzle (10 piece inset puzzle) Colors within 1/4" of lines Colors almost within lines of 4 inch circle Drops small objects into a jar Folds 2 pieces of paper in half lengthwise Folds two pieces of paper in half twice
  38. 38. OT: Fine and Visual Motor Dev. Milestones (Pls. take a minute and look at the OT packet) 39 Between Ages Seven and Ten Ten + Can tie knots Increased typing speed and motor skills for computer use Puts together intricate construction pieces Tool use for science activities and for other projects (e.g wood work) Uses hole punches, staplers, glue, scissors May become more clumsy with puberty Uses keyboard and mouse (may not use typing technique) Increased typing speed and motor skills for computer use May develop specialized skill (e.g. piano or needlework) Tool use for science activities and for other projects (e.g wood work) May begin to play musical instruments, and build things May become more clumsy with puberty Ages 8-9: Writes in cursive (learns in 3rd grade) Increased typing speed and motor skills for computer use
  39. 39. OT: Play Milestones (Pls. take a minute and look at the OT packet) 40 Between Ages Three and Four Between Ages Four and Five Between Ages Five and Six Plays cooperatively with others (shares, taking turns Participates in cooperative play with other children Displays good sportsmanship, win or lose Plays with an adult (tabletop, outdoor, singing game) Uses basic playground equipment safely Plays group games following rules Shares toys/equipment with another Independently tries out new activities Complex imitation of the real world, strong imagination, reconstructing real world Transfers from one activity to next Follows defined rules whether or not authority figure is present Uses words as part of play, to organize play, asks relevant how/what questions Performs/attempts new activity Creates own activities Cooperative play: compromises for the sake of the group; competitive games Imagines - assumes familiar roles Imagination is prominent - uses real world, uses knowledge to make up new situation Uses words to communicate with peers Talkative, plays with words, communicates to organize activities Associative play: similar activities with 2-3 peers, more interest in peers than play Cooperative play: takes turns, tries to control the play activities
  40. 40. Red Flags 41  5-6 year olds:  immature pencil/crayon grasp,  unable to hold/manipulate scissors  difficulty transitioning between tasks,  frequently falling/bumping into peers/furniture in classroom and outside on playground,  delayed writing skills,  unable to form letters correctly,  trouble with spacing, sizing  alignment for writing tasks, trouble copying from whiteboard(misses letters and/or words)
  41. 41. OT: Interventions/teaching strategies 42  Doing work on a vertical surface to increase shoulder stability and strengthen the wrist for writing/coloring/cutting activities  Provide activities that promote muscle strengthening, bilateral coordination, visual attention, etc
  42. 42. OT: Interventions/teaching strategies 43 4-5 5-6 6+ animal walks(crawling, creeping, crabwalk, wheelbarrow), playing or reading while laying on stomach supported on forearms, easel or chalkboard drawing, position puzzles on slanted surface, playdough on slanted surface, felt board or sticker books on a desktop easel, magnetic shapes on the refrigerator, soap finger painting on bathtub wall, pre-writing tasks using shaving cream, paint, pudding, salt, cornmeal, squirt bottles for cleaning/watering plants do writing/coloring tasks on slantboard, modeling clay activities, lego activities lego’s or other assembly toys requiring a model to follow
  43. 43.  I have all the documents in PDF and will be more than happy to e-mail resources to teachers. Marisa.barba@lausd.net

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