Green Energy - Crown Capital Management Jakarta Indonesia

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Crown Capital Management Jakarta Indonesia - With emerging renewable energy alternatives today, it is highly important that they be given enough attention even early on their developmental stages. Such technologies might not be ready for commercial uses yet but their potential should be amply tested and funded. Society's modern lifestyle is in serious need of energy that can be generated and consumed and yet, not compromise the future state for generations to come; to have no anxiety that it would cause damage to the environment.

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  • Crown Capital Management Caribou Genetics Reveal Shadow of Climate Change
    http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Caribou-Genetics-Reveal-Shadow-Climate-5001129.S.5819258353527844868?view=&gid=5001129&type=member&item=5819258353527844868&trk=NUS_DISC_Q-ttle

    When ice sheets marched across North America 20,000 years ago during the Last Glacial Maximum, they devoured liveable areas for caribou and isolated them from their Eurasian relatives for thousands of years.

    Now researchers have evidence that such climatic events have sculpted the genetics of North American caribou, which may make the animals unable to adapt to future climate change.

    “Although the past is not a guarantee for the future, it makes me pessimistic about the future of the species,” says Glenn Yannic, a population geneticist at Laval University in Quebec City, Canada, and lead author of a study published today in Nature Climate Change1.

    Major caribou herds around the globe are in decline. Scientists have blamed this on natural resource development and new roads that encroach on caribou habitat, and on changes in climate that put migrating caribou out of sync with spring plant growth, leaving them hungry. Most studies that forecast climate impacts on species look at ecosystems, individual species or populations, but not genetic factors on a global scale, says Yannic.

    “We’ve already been through a lot of climate change,” says Paul Wilson, a conservation geneticist at Trent University in Peterborough, Canada. “The genetics will give us information on what happened at the ice-age interface, so why wouldn’t you use it to then make projections?”

    Genetic analysis
    Yannic and his colleagues charted caribou evolution by analysing short lengths of DNA, called markers, from 1,297 caribou in the species' current range.

    The analysis revealed two distinct lineages of caribou that diverged about 300,000 years ago. The Euro-Beringia group currently ranges from Eurasia to western North America, occupying Greenland, Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, Russia, Alaska and the Canadian Arctic archipelago. The North American lineage settled in Quebec, Newfoundland and the Canadian Prairies.

    The work also showed differences in the genetic richness, or diversity, of the two groups. The researchers focused their genetic analysis on DNA sequences that are not known to help caribou adapt to new environments — known as neutral markers.

    They then paired the genetic data with a climate model that produced maps of suitable caribou habitat every 1,000 years for the past 21,000 years. This allowed them to hindcast the distribution of the two caribou lineages through time; they found the distribution of the groups lined up in both models. “It means we can be confident that climate has had a big influence on the distribution of caribou,” says Yannic.

    Only a thin stretch of habitat remained suitable for caribou in North America 21,000 years ago during the glaciation, killing off much of the population. As a result, many gene variants disappeared completely and the genetic diversity of the North American caribou lineage diminished. By contrast, the Euro-Beringia caribou, living in a more stable climate during the same period, were more genetically diverse.

    Future shock
    The team then looked to the future. If greenhouse-gas emissions remain stable, their model indicates that North American caribou may lose as much as 89% of their suitable habitat by 2080. Coupled with lower levels of genetic diversity, this could make North American caribou a rare sight outside of northern Quebec and Labrador, Yannic says.

    He predicts that the Euro-Beringia group will not suffer as badly, even though it may lose up to 60% of its suitable habitat.

    “It’s heartening to know that they are predicting some stability in the Eurasian population,” says Tara Fulton, a palaeogeneticist at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. “If the caribou have lots of diversity in these neutral markers, they will probably have a lot of diversity in those genes that allow them to adapt to environmental change.”
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  • Warsaw Pact: Parliament Should Debate Climate Change
    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/opinion/comments-analysis/warsaw-pact-parliament-should-debate-climate-change/articleshow/27440569.cms

    The just concluded climate negotiations at Warsaw have put us on a slippery slope towards a common framework where equity may not be included. A Parliamentary debate is needed as the response at the international and domestic level will shape our longer term future.

    Differentiation in the Climate Convention was based on three considerations. First, all countries had to take 'measures' but only developed nations were required to take 'commitments'. All countries have now also agreed to make 'contributions.'

    The second related to the specificity of the national reporting. The distinction was based on the national capacity to provide information, which has been steadily eroded in parallel negotiations. The third was the principle of 'common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities.' The Convention distinguishes between assessment of aggregated effect of measures taken by developing countries and the review of emission cut commitments in each developed country. Though nations whose emissions continue to grow but are withdrawing from earlier commitments have diluted the third element, it will be the focus when 'national preparations' are discussed multilaterally in 2014.

    The challenge is to ensure that peer review of the information we provide recognizes the extent of poverty, our meagre contribution to global emissions and the adverse impact of climate change as we take steps to conserve natural resources.

    We are faced with three global limits - carbon budget, consumption by the rich and comparable standards of living for the poor.

    Already cities produce three-quarters of global greenhouse gases, which are directly related to shelter, mobility and food. Urbanization involves two transitions. First is the establishment of infrastructure and consumption of material resources. Second, increased incomes lead to consumption of largely non-material goods and services. Both impact human well-being.

    Carbon dioxide emissions doubled between 1920-1950 when electrification was completed in developed countries. They doubled again between 1950-1970 by when 75% of their population moved from rural areas. Urban consumption patterns doubled it once again and stabilization came only around 2000.

    China's per capita emissions are on par with EU's and are expected to double by 2020. Urban transition and industrialization will be almost complete too. India's levels are one-fourth of these and because of our young population we can grow till after 2050 to achieve those standards.

    Ensuring that the new climate regime will make a genuine commitment to enlarge the pie rather than help someone grab a larger slice will not be easy. The history of these negotiations reflected power: We represented, they acted. Now we have to reframe issues, as our total emissions will soon make us the third largest emitter and we may lose support among developing countries.

    Our policymakers should read UNESCO's 'World Social Science Report 2013: Changing Global Environments' released while the Warsaw Conference was on. It concludes that climate and global environmental change must be reframed from a physical to a social problem.

    Recent analysis focuseson urban consumption as the driver of global emissions. For example, carbon dioxide from transportation is expected to be half of global emissions by 2050 - more than the future use of coal in generating electricity. Similarly, agriculture is responsible for 15% of greenhouse gas emissions with beef cattle contributing half. In our case, one third of our grains and vegetables are wasted. These trends need to be modified domestically through dense urban design, energy efficiency, public transport and cutting food wastage.
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  • Caribou Genetics Reveal Shadow of Climate Change
    http://www.nature.com/news/caribou-genetics-reveal-shadow-of-climate-change-1.14376

    When ice sheets marched across North America 20,000 years ago during the Last Glacial Maximum, they devoured liveable areas for caribou and isolated them from their Eurasian relatives for thousands of years.

    Now researchers have evidence that such climatic events have sculpted the genetics of North American caribou, which may make the animals unable to adapt to future climate change.

    “Although the past is not a guarantee for the future, it makes me pessimistic about the future of the species,” says Glenn Yannic, a population geneticist at Laval University in Quebec City, Canada, and lead author of a study published today in Nature Climate Change1.

    Major caribou herds around the globe are in decline. Scientists have blamed this on natural resource development and new roads that encroach on caribou habitat, and on changes in climate that put migrating caribou out of sync with spring plant growth, leaving them hungry. Most studies that forecast climate impacts on species look at ecosystems, individual species or populations, but not genetic factors on a global scale, says Yannic.

    “We’ve already been through a lot of climate change,” says Paul Wilson, a conservation geneticist at Trent University in Peterborough, Canada. “The genetics will give us information on what happened at the ice-age interface, so why wouldn’t you use it to then make projections?”

    Genetic analysis
    Yannic and his colleagues charted caribou evolution by analysing short lengths of DNA, called markers, from 1,297 caribou in the species' current range.

    The analysis revealed two distinct lineages of caribou that diverged about 300,000 years ago. The Euro-Beringia group currently ranges from Eurasia to western North America, occupying Greenland, Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, Russia, Alaska and the Canadian Arctic archipelago. The North American lineage settled in Quebec, Newfoundland and the Canadian Prairies.

    The work also showed differences in the genetic richness, or diversity, of the two groups. The researchers focused their genetic analysis on DNA sequences that are not known to help caribou adapt to new environments — known as neutral markers.

    They then paired the genetic data with a climate model that produced maps of suitable caribou habitat every 1,000 years for the past 21,000 years. This allowed them to hindcast the distribution of the two caribou lineages through time; they found the distribution of the groups lined up in both models. “It means we can be confident that climate has had a big influence on the distribution of caribou,” says Yannic.

    Only a thin stretch of habitat remained suitable for caribou in North America 21,000 years ago during the glaciation, killing off much of the population. As a result, many gene variants disappeared completely and the genetic diversity of the North American caribou lineage diminished. By contrast, the Euro-Beringia caribou, living in a more stable climate during the same period, were more genetically diverse.

    Future shock
    The team then looked to the future. If greenhouse-gas emissions remain stable, their model indicates that North American caribou may lose as much as 89% of their suitable habitat by 2080. Coupled with lower levels of genetic diversity, this could make North American caribou a rare sight outside of northern Quebec and Labrador, Yannic says.

    He predicts that the Euro-Beringia group will not suffer as badly, even though it may lose up to 60% of its suitable habitat.

    “It’s heartening to know that they are predicting some stability in the Eurasian population,” says Tara Fulton, a palaeogeneticist at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. “If the caribou have lots of diversity in these neutral markers, they will probably have a lot of diversity in those genes that allow them to adapt to environmental change.”
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
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Green Energy - Crown Capital Management Jakarta Indonesia

  1. 1. Crown Capital Management
  2. 2. The Company
  3. 3. Crown Capital Eco Management works with government bodies, international entities, private sectors and other non-governmentalorganizations in providing extensiveinformation to the public, media and policymakers that are involved inaddressing environmental issues andsustainable initiatives in a worldwide scale.
  4. 4. Guiding Principles
  5. 5. Although Crown Capital Management cooperates with various organizations, we maintain our being an independentbody, free from control of any particular government, state or institution and unimpaired by their own respective interests.
  6. 6. Related Legislation
  7. 7. Featuring an authoritativesource of legislation across the world that deals with environment preservationthrough promulgating policies on sanctions, regulations,authorizations and restrictions on natural resources.
  8. 8. Green Energy
  9. 9. With emerging renewable energyalternatives today, it is highlyimportant that they be given enoughattention even early on theirdevelopmental stages.
  10. 10. Such technologies might not be ready forcommercial uses yet but their potentialshould be amply tested and funded.Societys modern lifestyle is in seriousneed of energy that can be generated andconsumed and yet, not compromise thefuture state for generations to come; tohave no anxiety that it would causedamage to the environment.

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