Semantic Analysis in Language Technology
Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
Course Website: http://stp.lingfi...
Acknowledgements
 Thanks to Mats Dahllöf for the many slides I

borrowed from his previous course.

Lecture 2: Introducti...
Essay Assignment
 Work alone or in groups of two students
 Essay length: 5-6 pages for 1 student: 9-12 pages for

2 stud...
Essay Assignment: Deadlines
1.

Submission first version: 5 Dec 2013

2.

Oral presentation: 12 Dec 2013

3.

Feedback on ...
The purpose of the Essay Assignment
 Training in ”critical thinking”

 Training in writing and reviewing

academic texts...
Essay Topics
 Hands-on testing and description of a

system:


see demos and systems listed in the course website.

 Pr...
The topic sentence (Björk and Wickborg, 1981)
 A paragraph is a thought unit. It consists of a series of sentences

unifi...
Who is your audience?
 Any piece of academic writing should be structured

with reference to a clearly stated aim in a wa...
Critical Evaluation
 The essay (as most academic texts) should present a critical evaluation of

some claim.

 Critical ...
Critical Evaluation: Examples
 We compute metrics showing different changes in

performance for different data using diff...
Oral Presentation
 Highlight the important points. What is the main

message to convey?
 Be realistic about the amount o...
References, Citations and Quotations
 In academic writing you should give citations for each

work you use in your own wr...
Cf. Also the Thesis Structure
(self-reading)
 Content structure of a thesis
 Aim
 Background
 Main body and conclusion...
Content Structure of a Thesis

Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
Aim

Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
Background

Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
Main Body and Conclusions

Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
Abstract

Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
Suggested Readings
 Academic writing:
 Features of academic writing
 Academic writing conventions
 etc.
 How to write...
This is the end… Thanks for your attention !

Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
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Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment

  1. 1. Semantic Analysis in Language Technology Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment Course Website: http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~santinim/sais/sais_fall2013.htm MARINA SANTINI PROGRAM: COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS AND LANGUAGE TECHNOLOGY DEPT OF LINGUISTICS AND PHILOLOGY UPPSALA UNIVERSITY, SWEDEN 14 NOV 2013
  2. 2. Acknowledgements  Thanks to Mats Dahllöf for the many slides I borrowed from his previous course. Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  3. 3. Essay Assignment  Work alone or in groups of two students  Essay length: 5-6 pages for 1 student: 9-12 pages for 2 students  Oral presentation: 10 minutes for 1 student; 20 min for 2 students; 5-7 minutes for questions and discussion Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  4. 4. Essay Assignment: Deadlines 1. Submission first version: 5 Dec 2013 2. Oral presentation: 12 Dec 2013 3. Feedback on another group’s work: 17 Dec 2013 1. 2. 3. 4. 4. Links to the essays will be published on the course website; Each student must choose one essay submitted by another group and write a 1 page essay review; Send one copy of your essay review to me and one copy to the group members; Each group must take the reviewers’ feedback into account for the final essay submission. Essay final version and final submission: 20 Jan 2013 Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  5. 5. The purpose of the Essay Assignment  Training in ”critical thinking”  Training in writing and reviewing academic texts  Independent study of a system, an approach or a problem withing semantic-oriented language tecnology  Oral and witten presentation  Review procedure Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  6. 6. Essay Topics  Hands-on testing and description of a system:  see demos and systems listed in the course website.  Proposal, discussion and motivation of a future semantic-oriented application – unleash your imagination -- that could solve a real-word problem (similar, for ex, to the use case on cross-linguality we discussed last time);  Literature study on an approach or an issue in a semantic-related area. Think of it as a review article that you want to publish.  Testing of online demos may be included. Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  7. 7. The topic sentence (Björk and Wickborg, 1981)  A paragraph is a thought unit. It consists of a series of sentences unified by ONE controlling idea or topic, which is usually expressed in a topic sentence.  When you plan a paragraph the main thing is to have one central topic clearly in mind.  State your the basic topic early in the paragraph.  Once you have established your controlling topic or idea you must let it control the whole paragraph. Delete any sentence in the paragraph that is not related to the main idea.  Text coherence and cohesion can be controlled by an expert use of topic sentences and well-structured paragraphs. Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  8. 8. Who is your audience?  Any piece of academic writing should be structured with reference to a clearly stated aim in a way that is easy for the reader to understand. Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  9. 9. Critical Evaluation  The essay (as most academic texts) should present a critical evaluation of some claim.  Critical evaluation means assessing the relative merit of a piece of work, such as an implemented system, a more general method, or the “state-ofthe-art” in some field.  “Critical” (as in “critical thinking”) means that evidence is evaluated with the aim of reaching a conclusion about what to think or do.  “Critical” in this sense does not mean being “negative” or “disapproving” about something. That is rather a secondary more informal – but very common – sense of the word. Critical evaluation may lead to the conclusion that something is perfect as well as that it is worthless.   Perfection: We prove that an algorithm solves the problem it is presented as solving. Worthless: We show that a certain NLP method makes performance worse for a wide variety of data. Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  10. 10. Critical Evaluation: Examples  We compute metrics showing different changes in performance for different data using different NLP methods for solving a certain problem.  We also consider computational and economic costs of using these methods in a more general evaluation of their value. Basically, everthing must be interpreted, measured, and assessed on the positive side and on the negative side! Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  11. 11. Oral Presentation  Highlight the important points. What is the main message to convey?  Be realistic about the amount of information the audience can process – Think of yourselves and your attention span.  Use a visual presentation program in a way that supports the presentation. Slides are highly recommended.  Make sure you reach a proper ending. (Prepare your talk in such a way that some sections may be cut.) Rehearse. Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  12. 12. References, Citations and Quotations  In academic writing you should give citations for each work you use in your own writing. These works should be listed in the References section. Exactly the ones cited!  When you use the methods, concepts, conclusions of other people – using your own words – plain citation.  When you use the words of other people – quotation (citat) should be marked as such.  Handle all these things in a strict way according to some typical standard (e.g. IEEE citation standards)! Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  13. 13. Cf. Also the Thesis Structure (self-reading)  Content structure of a thesis  Aim  Background  Main body and conclusions  Abstract Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  14. 14. Content Structure of a Thesis Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  15. 15. Aim Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  16. 16. Background Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  17. 17. Main Body and Conclusions Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  18. 18. Abstract Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  19. 19. Suggested Readings  Academic writing:  Features of academic writing  Academic writing conventions  etc.  How to write an essay:  Easy steps  General guidelines  etc.  Peer-to-peer evaluation:  "Do's" and "Don't's”  Steps Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment
  20. 20. This is the end… Thanks for your attention ! Lecture 2: Introduction to the Essay Assignment

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