Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Why Medical Neuroscience?
In addition to core
Neuroscience courses, special
seminars and courses taken
within the Medical ...
for professional qualifications
in audiology and neurology.
We expect some graduates to
move to graduate level
medical cou...
Curriculum
information
Year 1
Core courses
Animal Behaviour
Animal behaviour from simple
reflexes and navigation to
social...
regulation and control uses
hormonal signalling as a
unifying principle.
Introduction to Molecular
Genetics
Modern concept...
Year 2
Core courses
Abnormal and Clinical
Psychology
Introduces the main
categories of psychological
disorders, the major ...
Statistics for Biologists
Biological systems are often
very variable, and knowledge
of statistics is necessary to
assess w...
Year 3
You will do a laboratory-based
project or write a literature-
based dissertation as well as
taking biology and
neur...
Why Medical Neuroscience?
Why Medical Neuroscience?
Why Medical Neuroscience?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Why Medical Neuroscience?

272 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Why Medical Neuroscience?

  1. 1. Why Medical Neuroscience? In addition to core Neuroscience courses, special seminars and courses taken within the Medical School emphasise clinical aspects including topics such as drugs action within the brain: brain development, degeneration and the changes accompanying ageing; the organisation and function of the sensory and motor pathways; the biological bases of pain and the diseases of motor control; the neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of learning, memory and dementias; the biological and psychological bases of major clinical syndromes in psychiatry; the biological and psychosocial bases of common neurological diseases. Why Medical Neuroscience at Sussex? At the University of Sussex we offer three degree programmes in Neuroscience: Cognitive Neuroscience, Medical Neuroscience and Neuroscience. We introduce you to topics in medical neuroscience, including an introduction to neurological problems for which treatments have been devised and for others that require resolution. In addition to the lectures, tutorial, practical and seminar teaching are essential elements of the programme that enable you to work both independently and in groups. Our aim is to encourage clear, informed thought and expression and to stimulate inquiry and originality. Neuroscientific research at Sussex is flourishing and regarded as among the best in the world, ensuring that the degree content is lively and up to date. You are encouraged to make informal contacts with teaching faculty and researchers, to ask questions, and discuss problems and opportunities. Career prospects Medical neuroscience is suitable for those who wish to pursue careers in research, either in the laboratory or a clinical setting. Graduates will also be well prepared to study 5
  2. 2. for professional qualifications in audiology and neurology. We expect some graduates to move to graduate level medical courses, but applicants need to consider carefully the benefits of obtaining a science BSc before starting preclinical studies. Funding your degree As a UK and EU student you can choose to pay fees up- front to the University during your period of study, or to defer payment until after you complete your studies. Which option you choose will depend on your preferences and circumstances. If you defer fee payment, the government will pay us on your behalf and will convert that amount into a non-means tested fee loan you repay after you have left and are earning a reasonable salary (currently more than £15,000 pa). The interest rate for fee loans is well below commercial rates and is tied to inflation. Sussex is offering scholarship and bursary schemes aimed especially at helping those from less well-off backgrounds. For the most up-to-date information on fees, Sussex bursaries and scholarships visit www.sussex.ac.uk/ugstudy, and to find out about full or partial maintenance grants, visit www.dfes.gov.uk/studentsu pport. Students from other countries are classified as ‘overseas’ and are liable to pay a higher fee rate (there are exceptions, such as students who are temporarily outside the UK/EU, those with refugee status granted by the British Government and migrant workers). Overseas students will be asked to provide evidence of your ability to pay the fees and to support yourself financially as a student. You pay choose to pay fees at either a variable or fixed rate. 6
  3. 3. Curriculum information Year 1 Core courses Animal Behaviour Animal behaviour from simple reflexes and navigation to social organisation, sensory and cognitive abilities; how behaviour is evolutionarily adapted to suit the needs of a given species. Cellular Biochemistry Cell behaviour; structure and function of proteins and enzyme action; introduction to immunology; nucleic acids and chromatin structure; introduction to molecular genetics; laboratory classes and data handling. Cognition in Clinical Contexts Introduces methods, theories and empirical findings associated with a scientific study of the mind. Students will learn how psychologists develop models of cognitive function that are tested against data from behavioural studies of healthy individuals, as well as from individuals with brain damage or psychopathology. Each topic will introduce key concepts about an aspect of cognition, and then looks at how an aspect of cognition is affected by brain injury (covering material such as agnosia, dyslexia and amnesia) and psychosis, or other clinical condition. Cognitive Psychology I. Introduces three fundamental areas of cognition: perception, attention, and memory. We examine the senses, including vision, hearing, touch, balance, and the chemical senses. We consider how attention relates to perception and to action. We survey memory and forgetting, including working memory, long-term memory, implicit memory, and memory dysfunction. Human Physiology An introduction to homeostasis and physiological mechanisms and control in humans and other mammals. This course deals with circulatory and respiratory systems, digestion and kidney function. The approach to 7
  4. 4. regulation and control uses hormonal signalling as a unifying principle. Introduction to Molecular Genetics Modern concepts and techniques in molecular genetics including: cloning; genetic libraries; DNA sequencing; site-directed mutagenesis; biotechnology; functional genomics. Neuroscience and Behaviour Basic components of the nervous system; how neurons transmit signals and process information; nervous and hormonal bases for sensory perception and behavioural action by humans and other animals; specialisation of the cerebral cortex. Neuroscience of Sensory Disorders Introduces the cellular and molecular mechanisms of hearing and vision. The focus is on how current biomedical science might offer treatments for deafness and blindness, and the likely obstacles to clinical innovation. The course reveals the diversity, multidisciplinarity of Neuroscience and the importance basic science to treating sensory disease and dysfunction. Physics for Neuroscientists A problem-based course that introduces aspects of light, sound and electrical physics of particular relevance to neuroscience. Social Dimensions of Biology Ethical and practical issues raised by contemporary biology for medicine and biodiversity. 8
  5. 5. Year 2 Core courses Abnormal and Clinical Psychology Introduces the main categories of psychological disorders, the major theories of causation and approaches to treatment, and an appreciation of the links between theory and the treatment of those disorders. Developmental Biology Interactions of nucleus and cytoplasm; mechanisms of regulation of gene expression during differentiation; origin of cell differences; communication; generation and regeneration of pattern during development. Functional Neuroanatomy Functional anatomy of the brain regions and their cellular components from both vertebrate and invertebrate organisms are thoroughly examined. You will describe anatomical substrates for processing of sensory information and the generation of motor commands to reveal the relationship between structure and function. Medical & Experimental Neuroscience This course is taken alongside medical students, and emphasises the clinical relevance of basic neuroscience. There are a mixture of lectures, seminars and student led projects, with a major input from clinicians associated with the Brighton & Sussex Medical School. This material is complemented by laboratory classes on basic neurophysiology. The course deals with many topics including: the structure and function of the brain; the way that drugs interact with the brain; the development of the brain as well as its degeneration and the changes accompanying ageing; the organisation and function of the sensory and motor pathways; the biological bases of pain and diseases of motor control; the neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of learning, memory and dementias. Neural Circuits How neural mechanisms generate animal behaviour; neural circuits and neural architectures within the brain. 9
  6. 6. Statistics for Biologists Biological systems are often very variable, and knowledge of statistics is necessary to assess whether our observations reflect causality or chance. This course presents the basics of statistics necessary to plan and conduct research projects in the biological sciences. Seminars in Medical Neuroscience Seminars based on selected readings from contemporary papers and textbooks provide insight into the workings of the brain and the nature of neural diseases. The course also provides an introduction to current and potential methods for studying, diagnosing and treating diseases of the nervous system and the senses. Techniques in Neuroscience You will receive practical experience of modern experimental techniques in neuroscience including electrophysiology, psychophysics and behaviour. Analysis and presentation of experimental data in the form of laboratory reports are practised 10
  7. 7. Year 3 You will do a laboratory-based project or write a literature- based dissertation as well as taking biology and neuroscience courses, which are offered in the following areas: Animal Intelligence and Cognition Learning and Memory Molecular Neuroscience A range of options, which may include: Cooperation and Conflict in Animal Societies Developmental Neurobiology Genes and Development Intelligence in Animals and Machines Neuronal Plasticity and Gene Regulation Neuronal Transmission and Transduction Many neuroscience students take at least one psychology course. These may include: Animal Vocal Communication Applications of Learning Theory Biological Basis of Mental Disorders Cognitive Neuropsychology Comparative Perspectives on Cognitive Development Issues in Motion Perception Neurobiological Mechanisms of Learning and Memory Psychobiology of Addiction Psychology of Appetite Sensory and Motor Functions of the Nervous System 11

×