STPS 5950 - 1 - Syllabus
Theology, the Person & Neuroscience
STPS 5950 – Fall 2005
Instructors: Robert John Russell (CTNS)...
STPS 5950 - 2 - Syllabus
addition, the course will provide sufficient neuroscience to enable the student to begin
drawing ...
STPS 5950 - 3 - Syllabus
Class Schedule
I. Broad Overview
1. Sept 6
• Introduction to Course
• Overview of Cognitive Scien...
STPS 5950 - 4 - Syllabus
Texts
Theology & Science Text:
Russell, Robert J., Nancey Murphy, Theo C. Meyering, and Michael A...
STPS 5950 - 5 - Syllabus
Readings
Readings are divided into Background, Required, and Recommended readings. The
Background...
STPS 5950 - 6 - Syllabus
Sept 20
Neuroanatomy
Background
Brown, Murphy & Maloney, chap 4, Jeeves, “Brain, Mind, and Behavi...
STPS 5950 - 7 - Syllabus
One of
Banich, chap 3.
Gazzaniga, chap 4.
Neuroethics
Background
Caplan, A. L. 2003. Is better be...
STPS 5950 - 8 - Syllabus
Tracy, David. 1981. The analogical imagination : Christian theology and the culture
of pluralism....
STPS 5950 - 9 - Syllabus
III. Consonance & Conflict
Nov 1 – Emerging Self
Emergence
Background
Gregory, The oxford compani...
STPS 5950 - 10 - Syllabus
Peters.Playing god? : Genetic determinism and human freedom, pp. 8, 17-27, chap 1
selection. 
...
STPS 5950 - 11 - Syllabus
One of
Banich, chap 13.
Gazzaniga, chap 14,15.
LeDoux, Synaptic self, chap 4.
Evolutionary Psych...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Theology, the Person

2,064 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,064
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Theology, the Person

  1. 1. STPS 5950 - 1 - Syllabus Theology, the Person & Neuroscience STPS 5950 – Fall 2005 Instructors: Robert John Russell (CTNS) Contact: rrussell@ctns.org (preferred) or (510) 649-2485 Office: 2465 LeConte, 2nd floor (above GTU bookstore) Mark Graves (GTU) Contact: mark_graves@comcast.net or (510) 525-1457 (home) Location: Mudd 204 (PSR) Time: Tuesdays, 12:40-3:30 Prerequisite: Either familiarity with systematic and philosophical theology (science or psychology background helpful, but not required) or Strong, relevant science background with highly motivated interest in theological analysis. Course Description This advanced MA/PhD seminar focuses on our growing understanding of the relationship between theological anthropology, cognitive science, and neuroscience. It provides the student a background in neuroscience; a mediating framework based on cognitive science to explore the connections between theology and neuroscience; and opportunities to participate in new scholarship in the relation between theology and neuroscience. Recent advances in the study of the brain provide key insights into human nature that impact contemporary theology. As the organ responsible for a person’s mental, emotional, volitional, and social characteristics, the brain plays a central role in the human aspects of religious experience. Theology provides systematic descriptions and critical reflection of the cognitive content of religious experience, spirituality, theological anthropology, neuroethics, imago Dei, and moral decision-making, some of which neuroscience and psychology are beginning to address. The course explores the relationship between theology and neuroscience using the tools of cognitive science—the inter-disciplinary study of mind drawing upon psychology, computer science, neuroscience, philosophy, linguistics, and anthropology. Each area of cognitive science may provide paths between neuroscience and a theological perspective on the person. In particular, topics examined in the course may include narrative and contemplative psychology; artificial intelligence and systems modeling; pragmatism and philosophy of mind; concepts and metaphor in language; and consciousness and emergence. The primary text for the course is from the CTNS/Vatican Observatory series, Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Additional readings come from neuroscience texts and articles. One of the goals of the class is to provide sufficient background in neuroscience for the student to understand the science used in the primary text and other books and articles in theology and neuroscience. In
  2. 2. STPS 5950 - 2 - Syllabus addition, the course will provide sufficient neuroscience to enable the student to begin drawing directly from scientists and basic scientific texts to explore new interactions. A claim of the course is that cognitive science provides a framework for understanding human nature in dialogue between theology and other cognitive disciplines including psychology, philosophy and neuroscience, and the course introduces several areas of cognitive science to illustrate the framework. As theology and neuroscience only recently began dialoging, many areas of fruitful interaction remain unexplored. The seminar provides students an opportunity to begin work in that area for possible use on other projects and to receive feedback from the instructors and other classmates as desired. To that aim, time within each class session will be available for student-led theological reflection on a relevant area of neuroscience or cognitive science. Course Goals • To introduce sufficient background in neuroscience for the student to understand and begin writing articles in theology and neuroscience. • To enable constructive interaction between theology and neuroscience by providing a mediating framework based on cognitive science to bridge the two disciplines. • To encourage students to engage in critical theological reflection on human nature informed by neuroscience. Course Requirements 1. Readings and class participation. Attendance at all class sessions and demonstration of reading and reflection through active class participation is expected. Please notify one of the instructors if a class must be missed. 2. Theological Reflection. During the semester, students will be responsible for presenting a theological reflection and leading its discussion relevant to that week’s topic. Reflection may draw upon additional theologians, and students are strongly encouraged to coordinate the topic with the instructors to meet the student’s interest, prior background, and other research needs. (Alternate requirements may be arranged for UCB or advanced MDiv students.) 3. Research paper. A research paper is due by 5pm on Tuesday, Dec 13. The paper should be 6-8,000 words in length not including references or footnotes or endnotes (approximately 25 pages in Turabian or Chicago Manual of Style). Students are encouraged to discuss their topic with an instructor prior to Nov 15. Doctoral students should note that Dr. Russell is willing, if desired, to assess the research paper for the purpose of completing the Research Readiness Review. If you have any unique learning needs, please consult with one of the instructors, and we will make every reasonable effort to accommodate you.
  3. 3. STPS 5950 - 3 - Syllabus Class Schedule I. Broad Overview 1. Sept 6 • Introduction to Course • Overview of Cognitive Science 2. Sept 13 • Religious Experience • Neurobiology 3. Sept 20 • Neuroanatomy • Philosophy of Mind 4. Sept 27 • Experimental Methods in Neuroscience • Neuroethics II. In-depth Analysis 5. Oct 4 – Cognitive Neuroscience 6. Oct 11 – Cognitive Linguistics 7. Oct 18 – Affective & Social Neuroscience 8. Oct 25 – No Class – Reading Week III. Consonance & Conflict 9. Nov 1 • Emergence • Transcendence & Atheism 10. Nov 8 • Neurobiology of Addiction (Guest) • Sin, Freedom & Healing 11. Nov 15 • Pragmatism • Habit, Virtue & Tendencies IV. Interaction 12. Nov 22 – AAR Conference (Guest) • Evolutionary & Developmental Perspectives on Experience • Evolutionary Psychology 13. Nov 29 – Psychology (Guest) • Buddhist Psychology 14. Dec 6 – Computational Approaches & Imago Dei • Artificial Intelligence, Computational Modeling & Systems Theory • Imago Dei 15. Dec 13 – No Class – Papers Due
  4. 4. STPS 5950 - 4 - Syllabus Texts Theology & Science Text: Russell, Robert J., Nancey Murphy, Theo C. Meyering, and Michael A. Arbib. Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Berkeley: Vatican Observatory Foundation ; Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences, 2002. Brown, Warren S., Nancey C. Murphy, and H. Newton Malony. Whatever Happened to the Soul? : Scientific and Theological Portraits of Human Nature Theology and the Sciences. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1998. (Recommended for Background reading only.) One of the following Neuroscience texts: Gazzaniga, Michael S., Richard B. Ivry, and G. R. Mangun. Cognitive Neuroscience : The Biology of the Mind. 2nd ed. New York: Norton, 2002. (For students with a biology background) Banich, Marie T. Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropsychology. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 2004. (For students with some science or psychology background) LeDoux, Joseph E. Synaptic Self : How Our Brains Become Who We Are. New York: Viking, 2002. (For students with no science background. Also recommended for other students.) Cognitive Science Texts: Varela, Francisco J., Evan Thompson, and Eleanor Rosch. The Embodied Mind : Cognitive Science and Human Experience. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1991. Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. Philosophy in the Flesh : The Embodied Mind and Its Challenge to Western Thought. New York: Basic Books, 1999. Reader: All readings not in one of the texts are available in one or two supplemental readers. The required readings are in a printed reader available at Vick’s copy center at 1879 Euclid at Hearst. Almost all the additional readings (including background and recommended readings) are available in electronic form in Adobe Acrobat format (pdf) on a CD. On the reading list, the items available on the printed reader are noted with a “” symbol, and those available as pdfs on a CD are noted with a “”.
  5. 5. STPS 5950 - 5 - Syllabus Readings Readings are divided into Background, Required, and Recommended readings. The Background readings contain additional material to assist in understanding the Required readings, should that topic be unfamiliar. The Recommended readings provide additional depth or context. Readings may change depending upon student interests. I. Broad Overview Sept 6 Science & Religion Background Barbour, Ian G. 1997. Religion and science : Historical and contemporary issues. San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, pp. 77-105, chap 4, “Ways of relating Science and Religion”. Sept 13 Religious Experience Background Barry, William A. 1987. Missing the meaning of religious experience. Human Development 8, no. 1: 37-41.  May, Gerald G. 1983. Will and spirit : A contemplative psychology. San Francisco: Harper & Row. pp. 52-68, chap 3.  Edwards, Denis. 1983. Human experience of god. New York: Paulist Press, pp. 6-12, chap 1 selection.  Required Newberg, Andrew B., Eugene G. D'Aquili, and Vince Rause. 2001. Why god won't go away : Brain science and the biology of belief. New York: Ballantine Books, p. 27-32, chap 6 (pp. 96-127) and/or 7 (pp. 128-141).  Russell, pp. 327-46, Watts, “Cognitive Neuroscience and Religious Consciousness”. Russell, pp. 347-55, Wildman/Brothers, “NeuropsychologicaI-Semiotic Model of Rcligious Experiences”, pp. 355-377, sections 2, 3. (Also, pp. 347-355, section 1 provides background to their article.) Recommended Russell, pp. 403-408, Wildman/Brothers, section 7.3. James, William. 1902. Varieties of religious experience : A study in human nature. London ; New York: Routledge, pp. 485-88, 507-19, Lecture XX, Conclusions, selection.  Smith, John Edwin. 1968. Experience and god. New York,: Oxford University Press, pp. 46-67, Chap 2.  Neurobiology One of LeDoux, chap 3. Banich, chap 2. Gazzaniga, chap 2.
  6. 6. STPS 5950 - 6 - Syllabus Sept 20 Neuroanatomy Background Brown, Murphy & Maloney, chap 4, Jeeves, “Brain, Mind, and Behavior”. One of Banich, chap 1.  Gazzaniga, chap 3. Philosophy of Mind Background Lodge, David. 2001. Thinks-- : A novel. New York: Viking, first third, pp. 1-102. LeDoux, chap 1. Searle, John R. 2004. Mind : A brief introduction. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, chap 1 (pp. 9-40); pp. 279-81, chap 11 selection.  Brown, Murphy & Maloney, chap 1, Murphy, “Human Nature”. Hamilton, Craig. 2005. Neuroscience, consciousness, and the soul. In Science and Religion: Global Perspectives. Philadelphia, PA: Metanexus Institute.  Required Searle, John R., Daniel Clement Dennett, and David John Chalmers. 1997. The mystery of consciousness. New York: New York Review of Books, chap 1.  Guttenplan, Samuel D. 1994. A companion to the philosophy of mind. Blackwell companions to philosophy. Oxford, OX, UK ; Cambridge, Mass., USA: Blackell Reference, pp. 46-51, sections 2.2-2.2.3.  Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica, part I, question 78. (http://www.ccel.org/a/aquinas/summa/FP/FP078.html) MacKay, Donald MacCrimmon and Valerie MacKay. 1991. Behind the eye. Gifford lectures ; 1986. Oxford, UK ; Cambridge, Mass., USA: B. Blackwell, chap 7.  Varela, pp. 59-81, chap 4, especially pp 59-72.  Recommended Gardner, Howard. 1985. The mind's new science : A history of the cognitive revolution. New York: Basic Books, chap 4, “Reason, Experience, and the Status of Philosophy”, pp. 49-88.  Russell, pp. 23-40, Kerr. Searle, The mystery of consciousness, chap 6, Palmers.  Gregory, R. L. 2004. The oxford companion to the mind. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, entries on consciousness and qualia.  Sept 27 Experimental Methods Required Damasio, H., T. Grabowski, R. Frank, A. M. Galaburda, and A. R. Damasio. 1994. The return of phineas gage: Clues about the brain from the skull of a famous patient. Science 264, no. 5162: 1102-5. In Cacioppo, John T. and Gary G. Berntson. 2004. Social neuroscience : Key readings. Key readings in social psychology. New York: Ohio State University Psychology Press, chap/reading 1. 
  7. 7. STPS 5950 - 7 - Syllabus One of Banich, chap 3. Gazzaniga, chap 4. Neuroethics Background Caplan, A. L. 2003. Is better best? A noted ethicist argues in favor of brain enhancement. Sci Am 289, no. 3: 104-5.  Required Farah, M. J. 2002. Emerging ethical issues in neuroscience. Nat Neurosci 5, no. 11: 1123-9.  Damasio, Antonio R. 2003. Looking for spinoza : Joy, sorrow, and the feeling brain. Orlando, Fla.: Harcourt, Chap 4.  Kung, Hans. 1976. On being a christian. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, pp. 530-9, first part of D.II “Being Human and Being Christian”.  Recommended Kung, pp. 540-53, remainder of D.II “Being Human and Being Christian”.  II. In-depth Analysis Oct 4 – Cognitive Neuroscience Background Brown, Murphy & Maloney, chap 5, Brown, “Cognitive Contributions to the Soul”. Lonergan, Bernard J. F. 1957. Insight; a study of human understanding. New York,: Philosophical Library, pp. 319-28, Chap 11 selections through 11.4.  Required LeDoux, chap 5. Libet, Benjamin. 2004. Mind time : The temporal factor in consciousness. Perspectives in cognitive neuroscience. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, foreword, pp. ix-vi..   Lonergan, pp. 328-39, Chap 11 selections.  One of LeDoux, chap 7, 9. Banich, chap 11. Gazzaniga, chap 12. Recommended Libet, chap 2. Libet, chap 4. Lonergan, pp. 339-47, Chap 11 selections.  Oct 11 – Cognitive Linguistics Background Lakoff, George. 1987. Women, fire, and dangerous things : What categories reveal about the mind. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, chap 2.  Lakoff and Johnson, pp. 16-73, chap 3-part of 6. Required Varela, pp. 147-84, Chap 8.  Lakoff and Johnson, pp. 267-89, chap 13, Self. Lakoff and Johnson, pp. 551-68, chap 25.
  8. 8. STPS 5950 - 8 - Syllabus Tracy, David. 1981. The analogical imagination : Christian theology and the culture of pluralism. New York: Crossroad, chap 10.  McFague, Sallie. 1982. Metaphorical theology : Models of god in religious language. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, pp. 1-29, chap 1.  Recommended Lakoff and Johnson, pp. 74-93, remainder of chap 6. Lakoff, George and Mark Johnson. 2003. Metaphors we live by. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 1-40, chaps 1-8. Ricoeur, Paul. 1977. The rule of metaphor : Multi-disciplinary studies of the creation of meaning in language. Toronto ; Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, pp. 101-33, chap/study 4.  Oct 18 – Affective & Social Neuroscience Emotions Background Russell, pp. 41-4, LeDoux (I), “Emotions: How I’ve Looked for Them in the Brain”. LeDoux, Joseph E. 1996. The emotional brain : The mysterious underpinnings of emotional life. New York: Simon & Schuster, chap 2, “Souls on Ice”.  Required Russell, pp. 101-18, LeDoux (II), “Emotions—A View through the Brain. One of LeDoux, chap 8, pp. 200-34, “The emotional brain revisited”. (Also recommended for everyone.) Banich, chap 12. Gazzaniga, chap 13. Recommended Peters, Ted. 1994. Sin : Radical evil in soul and society. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans. chap 2, “Anxiety: The Fear of Loss”.  Social Neuroscience Background Cacioppo, John T. 2002. Foundations in social neuroscience. Social neuroscience series. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, pp. 3-6.  Required Russell, pp. 67-74, Brothers, “A Neuroscientific Perspective on Human Sociality”. Russell, pp. 119-28, Jeannerod (II), “Are there Limits to the Naturalization of Mental States?”. Recommended Pannenberg, Wolfhart. 1985. Anthropology in theological perspective. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, pp. 157-87, chap 4 selection.  Saxe, R. and N. Kanwisher. 2003. People thinking about thinking people. The role of the temporo-parietal junction in "theory of mind". Neuroimage 19, no. 4: 1835-42. In Cacioppo and Berntson, Social neuroscience : Key readings, reading/chap 13.  Oct 25 – No Class – Reading Week
  9. 9. STPS 5950 - 9 - Syllabus III. Consonance & Conflict Nov 1 – Emerging Self Emergence Background Gregory, The oxford companion to the mind, entry on “emergence and reduction in explanations”.  Ellis, George. 2005. Physics and the real world. Physics Today 58, no. 7.  Brown, Murphy & Maloney, chap 6, Murphy, “Nonreductive Physicalism: Philosophical Issues”. Required Clayton, Philip. 2004. Mind and emergence : From quantum to consciousness. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, chap 1.  Russell, pp. 181-214, Clayton, “Neuroscience, the Person, and God: An Emergentist Account”. Russell, pp. 215-247, Peacocke, “The Sound of Sheer Silence: How Does God Communicate with Humanity?”. Deacon, Terrence W. 2003. The hierarchic logic of emergence: Untangling the interdependence of evolution and self-organization. In Evolution and learning : The baldwin effect reconsidered, ed. Bruce H. Weber and David J. Depew. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.  Recommended Palmer, Stuart. 2004. “Pastoral Care and Counseling Without the “Soul”. In Green, Joel B. 2004. What about the soul? : Neuroscience and christian anthropology. Nashville: Abingdon Press, chap 12, pp. 159-70.  Transcendence Background Rahner, Karl. 1978. Foundations of christian faith : An introduction to the idea of christianity. New York: Seabury Press, Introduction chapter.  Rahner, pp. 24-43, chap 1.  Required Rahner, pp. 116-37, chap 4.  Atheism Recommended Churchland, Patricia Smith. 2002. Brain-wise : Studies in neurophilosophy. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, pp. 373-402, chap 9, “Religion and the Brain”.  Nov 8 – Addiction & Freedom Background Brown, Murphy & Maloney, chap 9, Post, “A Moral Case for Nonreductive Physicalism”. One of LeDoux, chap 6. Banich, chap 10. Gazzaniga, chap 8. Required
  10. 10. STPS 5950 - 10 - Syllabus Peters.Playing god? : Genetic determinism and human freedom, pp. 8, 17-27, chap 1 selection.  Recommended Niebuhr, Reinhold. 1941. The nature and destiny of man; a christian interpretation. Gifford lectures, 1939. New York,: C. Scribner's Sons, chap 7, “Man as Sinner”.  Peters, 2003. Playing god? : Genetic determinism and human freedom. New York: Routledge, pp. 193-214, chap 9.  Nov 15 – Pragmatism & Habits Background Scheffler, Israel. 1974. Four pragmatists : A critical introduction to peirce, james, mead, and dewey. International library of philosophy and scientific method. New York: Humanities Press, pp. 1-9, Introduction.  Required Kent, Bonnie. 2002. Habits and virtues (ia iiae, qq. 49-70). In The ethics of aquinas, ed. Stephen J. Pope:xv, 496 p. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.  Lee, Sang Hyun. 2000. The philosophical theology of jonathan edwards. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, pp. 15-17, 34-46, 76-9, 89, 90, 95, selections from chaps 1-4.   Hausman, Carl R. 1993. Charles s. Peirce's evolutionary philosophy. Cambridge [England] ; New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-19, Introduction.  Recommended Smith, John Edwin. 1978. Purpose and thought : The meaning of pragmatism. New Haven: Yale University Press, pp. 13-49, chap 1.  Peirce, Charles S. 1905 “Issues in Pragmatism.” In Peirce, Charles S. 1960. Collected papers. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, vol V, para 438-463.  Gelpi, Donald L. 2001. The gracing of human experience: Rethinking the relationship between nature and grace. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical Press, pp. 137-172, chap 4 on Peirce. (Also Chap 5 on Royce, and Chap 8 for Gelpi.) Royce, Josiah. 1912. The sources of religious insight. New York,: C. Scribner's sons, pp. 3-34, chap 1.  IV. Interaction Nov 22 – Development & Evolution Evolutionary & Developmental Perspectives on Experience Recommended Varela, pp. 185-214, chap 9. Ayala “Human Nature: One Evolutionist’s View” in Brown, Warren S., Nancey C. Murphy, and H. Newton Malony. 1998. Whatever happened to the soul? : Scientific and theological portraits of human nature. Theology and the sciences. Minneapolis: Fortress Press.
  11. 11. STPS 5950 - 11 - Syllabus One of Banich, chap 13. Gazzaniga, chap 14,15. LeDoux, Synaptic self, chap 4. Evolutionary Psychology Recommended Gregory, The oxford companion to the mind, entry on evolutionary psychology. Nov 29 – Psychology Required Rosch, Eleanor. 2005. Beginner's mind: Paths to the wisdom that is not learned. In Teaching for wisdom, ed. M. Ferrari and G. Potworowski. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.  LeDoux, chap 11. Dec 6 – Computational Approaches & Imago Dei Background Gregory, The oxford companion to the mind, entry on artificial intelligence.  Charniak, Eugene and Drew V. McDermott. 1985. Introduction to artificial intelligence. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, chap 1, in particular sections 1.4 & 1.7.  Bertalanffy, Ludwig von. 1975. Perspectives on general system theory : Scientific- philosophical studies. The international library of systems theory and philosophy. New York: G. Braziller, chap 2.  Required Russell, pp. 249-80, Barbour. Brooks, Rodney A., Cynthia Breazeal (Ferrell), Robert Irie, Charles C. Kemp, Matthew Marjanovi, Brian Scassellati, and Matthew M. Williamson. 1998. Alternate essences of intelligence. In AAAI-98.  MacKay, Behind the eye, chap 8.  Herzfeld, Noreen L. 1999. Imago dei/imago hominis : Interacting images of god and humanity in theology and in artificial intelligence, pp. 68-84, chap 5.  Niebuhr, The nature and destiny of man; a christian interpretation, chap 6, “Man as Image of God and as Creature”.  Recommended Minsky, Marvin Lee. 1986. The society of mind. New York: Simon and Schuster, pp. 17-20, 27, 30, 39-42, 53-4, 82-92, 109-11, 245-9, 250, 299, 301-7.  Vatican's International Theological Commission. 2004. Communion and Stewardship: Human Persons Created in the Image of God. http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/cti_documents/rc_co n_cfaith_doc_20040723_communion-stewardship_en.html  Georges, T. M. 2003. Digital soul : Intelligent machines and human values. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, chap 7, “What is consciousness?” 

×