Neuroscience 437
Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
General Educ...
438 Neuroscience (A Graduate Group)
Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in paren...
Neurology 439
Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
General Educati...
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Neuroscience

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Neuroscience

  1. 1. Neuroscience 437 Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience 261B. Topics in Vision: Systems, Psychophysics, Computational Models (2) Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, course 261A recommended. Functions of the central visual pathways and their underlying mechanisms. Recent research on aspects of anat- omy, biochemistry, electrophysiology, psychophys- ics, development, and genetics of the visual system. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 261B and Molecular, Cellular, and Integra- tive Physiology 261B.) (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—II. Britten 261C. Topics in Vision: Clinical Vision Science (2) Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 261A and 261B or consent of instructor. Causes and mechanistic bases of major blinding diseases. Recent research on aspects of anatomy, biochemis- try, electrophysiology, psychophysics, development, and genetics of the visual system related to disease. (Same course as Neuroscience 261C and Molecu- lar, Cellular, and Integrative Physiology 261C.) Not offered every year. (S/U grading only.)—(III.) Wer- ner 263. Modeling in Systems Neuroscience (4) Lecture—3 hours; lecture/laboratory—1 hour. Pre- requisite: consent of instructor. Modeling as a tool in systems neuroscience. Mathematical techniques will be introduced and used to explore advanced topics in echolocation, sound localization, electrorecep- tion, communications, and motor systems. Other top- ics include transforms, modeling assumptions, scales and linearity. Offered in alternate years. 267. Computational Neuroscience (5) Lecture—4 hours; lecture/laboratory—3 hours. Pre- requisite: one course in general neuroscience at the level of course 100; one year college-level Calculus at level of Math 16A, B, C; one year Physics at the level of Physics 7A, B, C, strongly recommended; students from other departments should contact the instructor. Mathematical models and data analysis techniques used to describe computations performed by nervous systems. Lecture topics include single-neu- ron biophysics, neural coding, network dynamics, memory, plasticity, and learning. Lab topics include programming mathematical models and data analy- sis techniques in MATLAB. Offered in alternate years. (Same course as Neuroscience 267.)—(I.) Goldman 270. How to Write a Fundable Grant Proposal (3) Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in a life science and consent of instructor. Familiarization with the skills required to craft a suc- cessful grant proposal submitted to extramural agen- cies such as NIH and NSF. 285. Literature in Visual Neuroscience (2) Seminar—2 hours. Literature in Visual Neuroscience. (Same course as Neuroscience 285.) May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Britten, Ditterich, Goldman, Usrey 287A. Topics in Theoretical Neuroscience (2) Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of topics in theoretical neurosci- ence. Topic varies each year. Fall quarter (287A): foundational material from books and review arti- cles. Spring quarter (287B): continuation of year's topic through readings of seminal articles from the primary literature. Offered in alternate years. May be repeated for credit. (Same course as Neurosci- ence 287A.) (S/U grading only.)—(I.) Ditterich, Goldman 287B. Topics in Theoretical Neuroscience (2) Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of topics in theoretical neurosci- ence. Topic varies each year. Fall quarter (287A): foundational material from books and review arti- cles. Spring quarter (287B): continuation of year's topic through readings of seminal articles from the primary literature. May be repeated for credit. (Same Course as Neuroscience 287B.) (S/U grad- ing only.)—III. (III.) Ditterich, Goldman 291. Auditory Neuroscience (1) Seminar—0.5 hours; discussion—0.5 hours. Prereq- uisite: course 100 or 112 or Neuroscience 222 or the equivalent. Exploration of various important aspects of auditory physiology, behavior and psy- chophysics through review of original literature. New topic each quarter. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) DeBello, Recanzone, Sutter Neuroscience See Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, on page 431; and Neuroscience (A Graduate Group), below. Neuroscience (A Graduate Group) Barbara Chapman, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Group Group Office. 148 Center for Neuroscience (530) 757-8845; http://neuroscience.ucdavis.edu/grad Faculty Mark Agius, M.D., Professor (Neurology) David Amaral, Ph.D., Professor (Psychiatry) Kathleen Baynes, Ph.D., Professor (Neurology) Robert Berman, Ph.D., Professor (Neurological Surgery) Laura Borodinsky, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Physiology and Membrane Biology) Kenneth H. Britten, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Marie Burns, Ph.D., Professor (Ophthalmology and Vision Science) Earl E. Carstens, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Cameron Carter, Ph.D., Professor (Psychology and Behavioral Science) Barbara Chapman, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Tsung-Yu Chen, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Neurology) Hwai-Jong Cheng, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Blythe Corbett, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) Gino Cortopassi, Ph.D., Professor (Molecular Biosciences) William DeBello, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Charlie DeCarli, Ph.D., Professor (Neurology) Wenbin Deng, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Cell Biology and Human Anatomy) Elva Diaz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Pharmacology) Elizabeth Disbrow, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Neurology) Jochen Ditterich, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Arne Ekstrom, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Psychology) Michael Ferns, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine) Joy Geng, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Psychology) Mark Goldman, Assistant Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior) Qizhi Gong, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Medicine: Cell Biology and Human Anatomy) Fredric Gorin, M.D., Ph.D., Professor (Neurology) Paul Hagerman, M.D., Ph.D., Professor (Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine) Randi Hagerman, M.D., Professor (Pediatrics) Andrew T. Ishida, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior and Ophthalmology) Petr Janata, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Psychology) Lee-Way Jin, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Pathology) Paul S. Knoepfler, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Cell Biology and Human Anatomy) Leah Krubitzer, Ph.D., Professor (Psychology) Janine LaSalle, Ph.D., Professor (Medical Microbiology and Immunology) Pamela Lein, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Molecular Biosciences) Noelle L'Etoile, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Psychiatry) Steven Luck, Ph.D., Professor (Psychology) Bruce Lyeth, Ph.D., Professor (Neurological Surgery) Richard Maddock, M.D., Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) George (Ron) Mangun, Ph.D., Professor (Psychology, Neurology) Kimberley McAllister, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Neurology, and Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior) Lee Miller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Brian Mulloney, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Liping Nie, Ph.D., Assistant Adjunct Professor (Otolaryngology) Stephen Noctor, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) John Olichney, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Neurology) Isaac N. Pessah, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Molecular Biosciences) David Pleasure, M.D., Ph.D., Professor (Neurology and Pediatrics) J. Daniel Ragland, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) Charan Ranganath, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Psychology) Gregg H. Recanzone, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) David Richman, M.D. Professor (Neurology) Susan Rivera, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Psychology) Philip A. Schwartzkroin, Ph.D., Professor (Neurological Surgery) Frank Sharp, M.D., Professor (Neurology) Karen Sigvardt, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor (Neurology) Tony Simon, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) Mitchell L. Sutter, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology) Diane Swick, Ph.D., Associate Adjunct Professor (Neurology) Brian Trainor, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Psychology) Jim Trimmer, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Martin Usrey, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior and Neurology) Ana Elena Vazquez, Ph.D., Assistant Adjunct Professor (Otolaryngology) John Werner, Ph.D., Professor (Ophthalmalogy and Vision Science, Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior) David Woods, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor (Neurology) Ebenezer Yamoah, Ph.D., Professor (Otolaryngology) Andrew Yonelinas, Ph.D., Professor (Physiology) Chengji Zhou, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Cell Biology and Human Anatomy) Min Zhao, M.D., Ph.D., Professor (Dermatology, Ophthalmology) Karen Zito, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Emeriti Faculty Leo M. Chalupa, Ph.D., Professor (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Edward G. Jones, M.D., Ph.D., Professor (Psychiatry) Graduate Study. The Graduate Group in Neuro- science offers programs of study leading to the Ph.D. degree. Neuroscience is a broad, interdepartmental program with faculty interests ranging from molecu- lar biophysics of channels to cortical organization and cognition. A major goal of the program is to prepare students for careers as research scientists.
  2. 2. 438 Neuroscience (A Graduate Group) Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience Details of the program may be obtained from the Group office. Graduate Advisers. R. Berman (Neurological Surgery), H. Cheng (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior), B. Chapman (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior), A. Ekstrom (Psychology), K. McAllis- ter (Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior) Courses in Neuroscience (NSC) Upper Division Course 160. Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (3) Lecture—1.5 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Prerequi- site: Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 100, Biological Sciences 101 and consent of instructor. Selected topics in neurobiology. Topics include chan- nel biophysics, action potential propagation, intrac- ellular signal transduction pathways, synaptic physiology and quantal analysis, cellular mecha- nisms of synaptic plasticity, and neuromodulation of synaptic circuitry. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 160.)—III. (III.) Burns, Mulloney Graduate Courses 200LA. Laboratory Methods in Neurobiology (6) Laboratory—18 hours. Prerequisite: graduate stand- ing in the Neuroscience Graduate Group. Individual research in the laboratory of a faculty member. Research problems emphasize the use of contempo- rary methods and good experimental design. May be repeated three times for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) 200LB. Laboratory Methods in Neurobiology (3) Laboratory—9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate stand- ing in the Neuroscience Graduate Group. Individual research in the laboratory of a faculty member. Research problems emphasize the use of contempo- rary methods and good experimental design. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) 201. Neuroanatomy (3) Lecture—2 hours; laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mix of lectures, demonstrations, and dissections, emphasizing func- tional significance of neuroanatomy from a biologi- cal perspective, with comparisons between human and non-human brains. Emphasis placed on func- tional anatomy of the nervous system, integrated with cellular, molecular, cognitive, and developmen- tal concepts. Limited enrollment.—I. (I.) Amaral, Chapman, Jones, Usrey 211. Advanced Topics in Neuroimaging (2) Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 210 or consent of instructor. Critical presentation and dis- cussion of the most influential advanced issues in neuroimaging, emphasizing fMRI design/analysis and the integration of fMRI with EEG/MEG. Limited enrollment. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiol- ogy and Behavior 211 and Psychology 211.) (S/U grading only.)—II. (II.) Miller 220. How to Give a Scientific Seminar (3) Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Presentation of effective seminars. Student presentations of selected neuroscience topics in sem- inar format. Must be taken in two consecutive quar- ters.—II-III. (II-III.) DeBello, McAllister 221. Cellular Neurophysiology (4) Lecture—4.5 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Physiological aspects of cel- lular and subcellular organization of the nervous sys- tem. Neuronal cell biology, the structure and function of ion channels, electrical excitability, signaling cas- cades, sensory transduction and, mechanisms of syn- aptic transmission, and the cellular basis of learning and memory.—I. (I.) Burns, Chen, Trimmer 222. Systems Neuroscience (5) Lecture—4 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Integra- tive and information-processing aspects of nervous system organization. Topics include sensory systems, motor function, sensorimotor integration, the limbic system, and the neurobiology of learning and mem- ory. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 222.)—II. (II.) Usrey 223. Cognitive Neuroscience (4) Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate student standing in Psychology or Neuro- science or consent of instructor. Graduate core course for neuroscience. Neurobiological bases of higher mental function including attention, memory, language. One of three in three-quarter sequence. (Same course as Psychology 261.)—III. (III.) Swaab 224A. Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology (2) Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Key issues in developmental and molecu- lar neurobiology. Discussion emphasis on critical evaluation of the experiments and methods described in research papers. Readings of seminal, primary research papers, reviews, and book chap- ters. Reading materials will be distributed one week in advance.—II. (II.) Diaz, L’Etoile 224B. Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology (2) Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 224A or consent of instructor. Continuation of course 224A. Key issues in developmental and molecular neurobiology, focusing on developmental topics. Discussion emphasis on critical evaluation of experiments and methods described in associated lit- erature.—III. Chapman, Cheng 225. Translational Research in the Neurobiology of Disease (2) Lecture—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Past or concurrent enrollment in Neuroscience courses 221, 222, 223, or permission of instructor; restricted to current graduate student enrollment or permission of instructor. This course will provide an overview of major neuropsychiatric and neurologi- cal disorders from both the clinical and fundamental science perspectives. Offered in alternate years.—II. Carter, Jones, Schwartzkroin 226. Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology (4) Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Introduction to molecular and developmen- tal neurobiology. Topics range from neurulation to development of sensory systems and include modern molecular methods and their application in develop- mental neuroscience.—II. (II.) McAllister, L’Etoile 243. Topics in Cellular and Behavioral Neurobiology (2) Discussion—1 hour; seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An advanced examination of several current problems in neurobiology. Topics will vary in different years; may be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—III. (III.) Ishida 247. Topics in Functional Neurogenomics (2) Lecture—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. The the- ory, methods and principles of functional neurog- enomics with emphasis on the relationship to molecular mechanisms involved in development and disease of the nervous system. (Same course as Neu- robiology, Physiology, and Behavior 247.)—II. Choudary 250. Biology of Neuroglia (2) Lecture/discussion—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: con- sent of instructor. The properties and functions of non-neuronal or neuroglial cells in the mammalian central nervous system with relevance to neuronal development, physiology and injury response. Offered in alternate years. (Same course as Cell Biology and Human Anatomy 250.) (S/U grading only.)—III. 261A. Topics in Vision: Eyes and Retinal Mechanisms (2) Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 100 or 112 or the equivalent. Structure and function of the visual system, with emphasis on the eye and retina, including optics, anatomy, transduction, reti- nal synapses, adaptation, and parallel processing. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 261A and Molecular, Cellular, and Inte- grative Physiology 261A.) (S/U grading only.)—II. (II.) Ishida 261B. Topics in Vision: Systems, Psychophysics, Computational Models (2) Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, course 261A recommended. Functions of the central visual pathways and their underlying mechanisms. Recent research on aspects of anat- omy, biochemistry, electrophysiology, psychophys- ics, development, and genetics of the visual system. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 261B and Molecular, Cellular, and Integra- tive Physiology 261B.) (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—II. Britten 261C. Topics in Vision: Clinical Vision Science (2) Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 261A and 261B, or consent of instructor. Causes and mechanistic bases of major blinding diseases. Recent research on aspects of anatomy, biochemis- try, electrophysiology, psychophysics, development, and genetics of the visual system related to disease. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 261C and Molecular, Cellular, and Inte- grative Physiology 261C.) (S/U grading only.) Not offered every year.—III. Werner 267. Computational Neuroscience (5) Lecture—4 hours; lecture/laboratory—3 hours. Pre- requisite: one course in general neuroscience at the level of course 100; one year college-level Calculus at level of Math 16A, B, C; one year Physics at the level of Physics 7A, B, C, strongly recommended; students from other departments should contact the instructor. Mathematical models and data analysis techniques used to describe computations performed by nervous systems. Lecture topics include single-neu- ron biophysics, neural coding, network dynamics, memory, plasticity, and learning. Lab topics include programming mathematical models and data analy- sis techniques in MATLAB. Offered in alternate years. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology & Behavior 267.)—(I.) Goldman 283. Neurobiological Literature (1) Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Critical presentation and analysis of recent journal articles in neurobiology. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Mulloney, Wil- son 284. Development of Sensory Systems (1) Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Presentation and discussion of recent literature on the development of sensory systems. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—II, III. (II, III.) Chapman 285. Literature in Visual Neuroscience (2) Seminar—2 hours. Critical presentation and discus- sion of current literature in visual neuroscience. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 285.) May be repeated for credit if topic differs. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Usrey, Britten 287A. Topics in Theoretical Neuroscience (2) Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of topics in theoretical neurosci- ence. Topic varies each year. Fall quarter (287A): foundational material from books and review arti- cles. Spring quarter (287B): continuation of year's topic through readings of seminal articles from the primary literature. May be repeated for credit. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology & Behav- ior 287A.) (S/U grading only.)—(I.) Ditterich, Gold- man 287B. Topics in Theoretical Neuroscience (2) Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of topics in theoretical neurosci- ence. Topic varies each year. Fall quarter (287A): foundational material from books and review arti- cles. Spring quarter (287B): continuation of year's topic through readings of seminal articles from the primary literature. May be repeated for credit.
  3. 3. Neurology 439 Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience (Same Course as Neurobiology, Physiology & Behavior 287B.) (S/U grading only.)—III. (III.) Ditter- ich, Goldman 289. Topics in Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology (1) Seminar—2 hours. Analysis and discussion of semi- nal and current research papers in molecular and developmental neurobiology. Different topics will be covered each quarter. In the past topics have included, “Synaptic vesicle dynamics,” “Neuronal polarity,” and “Glutamate receptors.” May be repeated ten times for credit when topic differs. (S/U grading only.)—II, III. (II, III.) Diaz, McAllister, Zito 290C. Research Conference in Neurobiology (1) Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Neuroscience or consent of instructor; course 299 (concurrently). Presentation and discussion of faculty and graduate student research in neurobiology. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) 292. Cortical Plasticity and Perception (2) Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: Neurobi- ology, Physiology, and Behavior 100 or 112 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Examination of research articles on cortical plasticity and changes in perception. Examples drawn from studies of the somatosensory, visual, auditory, and motor cortex. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 292.) Offered in alternate years. (S/U grading only.)—(II.) 298. Group Study (1-5) (S/U grading only.) 299. Research (1-12) (S/U grading only.) Neurology See Medicine, School of, on page 380. Neurosurgery See Medicine, School of, on page 380. Nursing, School of, Betty Irene Moore Heather M. Young, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.; Associate Vice Chancellor for Nursing, UC Davis Health System; Dean, Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing Deborah Ward, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., Associate Dean 4610 X St., Suite 4202 Sacramento, Ca 95817 (916) 734-2145 http://nursing.ucdavis.edu Mission Statement The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence through immersive, interprofessional and interdisciplinary education and research in partnership with the com- munities serves. Faculty, staff and students discover and disseminate knowledge to advance health, improve quality of care and shape policy. Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership Graduate Degree Program Hosted by the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis, the Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership Graduate Degree Program opens to the inaugural classes of doctoral and master's degree students in fall 2010. The UC Davis Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership Graduate Degree Program prepares nurse leaders, researchers and faculty in a unique interdisciplinary and interprofes- sional environment. The graduate group is com- posed of faculty from across campus with expertise in nursing, medicine, health informatics, nutrition, biostatistics, public health and other fields. The doc- toral program, an academic program, prepares graduates as health-care and health policy leaders and nurse faculty/researchers at the university level. Graduates of the professional master's degree pro- gram will be well prepared for health-care leader- ship roles in a variety of organizations and as nurse faculty at the community college and prelicensure education levels. Faculty Paul FitzGerald, Ph.D., Graduate Group Chair, Professor, Acting Chair (Cell Biology and Human Anatomy) Lars Berglund, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Dean for Research, Professor of Medicine; Director, UC Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center Timothy W. Cutler, Pharm. D., Assistant Clinical Professor (Clinical Pharmacy); School of Pharmacy, UC San Francisco; UC Davis Director, Sacramento Experimental Pharmacy Program Christiana Drake, Ph.D., Chair (Biostatistics Graduate Group); Professor (Statistics) Suzanne Eidson-Ton, M.D., M.S., Assistant Clinical Professor (Family and Community Medicine; OB/ GYN) Scott Fishman, M.D., Professor, Chief of Pain Medicine (Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine) Ellen Gold, Ph.D. Professor, Chair (Public Health Sciences) Donald M. Hilty, M.D., Professor of Clinical Psychiatry (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) Ladson Hinton, M.D., Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences); Director, Education Core, UC Davis Alzheimer's Disease Center Calvin Hirsch, M.D., Professor (Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine) Karnjit Johl, M.D., Assistant Professor (Internal Medicine) Richard L. Kravitz, M.D., M.S.P.H., Professor, Co- Vice Chair (General Medicine) Frederick J. Meyers, M.D., Executive Associate Dean, School of Medicine; Professor (Internal Medicine); Medical Director, Home Health Services Richard Michelmore, Ph.D., Director, Genome Center and Bioinformatics Program (Medical Microbiology and Immunology); Professor (Plant Sciences); Professor (Molecular and Cellular Biology) Elizabeth Miller, M.D., Ph.D. Assistant Professor (Pediatrics) Thomas S. Nesbitt, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Vice Chancellor for Strategic Technologies and Alliances; Professor (Family and Community Medicine) Debora Paterniti, Ph.D., Associate Adjunct Professor (Internal Medicine, Sociology, Center for Healthcare Policy and Research) Anthony Philipps, M.D., Professor, Chair (Pediatrics) Patrick S. Romano, M.D., Professor (Internal Medicine, General Medicine, Pediatrics) Elena Siegel, Ph.D., R.N., Assistant Professor Andreea Seritan, M.D., Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine) Ulfat Shaikh, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., Assistant Professor (Pediatrics) Hendry Ton, M.D., M.S.P.H., Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor (Psychiatry, Behavioral Sciences) Marlene M. von Friederichs-Fitzwater, Ph.D., M.P.H., Adjunct Assistant Professor (Hematology, Oncology); Director, Outreach Research and Education Program, UC Davis Cancer Center Deborah Ward, Ph.D., R.N., Associate Dean, Associate Clinical Professor (Health Sciences) Peter Yellowlees, M.B.B.S., M.D., Director, Health Informatics; Professor (Psychiatry, Behavioral Sciences) Heather M. Young, Ph.D., R.N., Associate Vice Chancellor, Nursing; Dean, Professor in Residence Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr, Ph.D., Specialist, Cooperative Extension Specialist (Nutrition) Courses in Nursing (NRS) Graduate Courses 201. Health Status and Care Systems (4) Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory/discus- sion; project. Prerequisite: current enrollment in the Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership gradu- ate program or consent of instructor. Comparative health status data, major current health issues glob- ally, nationally, regionally. Theoretical perspectives on social, political, economic determinants of health. Health-care systems examined, linked to data, and evaluated in re outcomes. Aging, rural, ethnic minor- ity populations highlighted.—I. (I.) 202. Implementation Science (4) Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: current enrollment in the Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership graduate program or consent of instruc- tor. Change processes in health care from political, historic, economic and sociologic frameworks. His- toric and current examples of transformative change in the health care system. Skills for system transfor- mation through health policy, practice, research and education are emphasized.—II. (II.) 203. Leadership in Health Care (4) Lecture/discussion—3 hours; fieldwork. Prerequisite: current enrollment in the Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership graduate program or con- sent of instructor. Critical examination of leadership from a variety of theoretical and philosophical per- spectives and focuses on specific challenges in health care and leadership at various levels, e.g., patient, organizational, and policy levels.—III. (III.) 204. Quantitative Skills for Change (4) Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory/discus- sion—1 hour. Prerequisite: current enrollment in the Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership gradu- ate program or consent of instructor. Foundation for analyzing research, health, and systems data to answer clinical, systems, or policy questions. Use and examine multiple sources of data and informa- tion as a basis for planned change and transforma- tion in health care.—III. (III.) 205. Research Design in Nursing and Health (4) Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: current enrollment in the Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership graduate program or consent of instruc- tor. Major types of quantitative and qualitative research design and their application to nursing and health care research. Implications of choosing alter- native research designs and critical analysis of philo- sophical underpinnings. Evaluation of control and validity, sampling, instruments to measure health concepts.—III. (III.) 206. Community Connections (2-5) Prerequisite: current enrollment in the Nursing Sci- ence and Health-Care Leadership graduate program or consent of instructor. Open to NSHL MS students only. Community-based learning and experiences including community participation, assessment, data collection and analysis using multiple approaches, community health improvement projects, collabora- tive leadership practice, all with the guidance of community members and nursing faculty. (S/U grad- ing only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

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