Course Information Packet
Biology 358 — Neuroanatomy
A Course Taught on a Modified Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Format
Win...
2
• Developed a 3-dimensional understanding of neuroanatomical relationships within
the brain and spinal cord
• Developed ...
3
taught in a manner unlike anything you have had in the Biology Department thus far. In
this class you will
• Use the Ind...
4
5. Quizzes: Eight quizzes will be given throughout the term. The first quiz, which cannot be
dropped, covers terminology...
5
d. Each PBL group must choose a leader. The PBL group leader serves several
important functions. Among these functions a...
6
• Typist(s)—This member (or members, depending upon the size of the
report) is responsible for typing some or all of the...
7
• Any terminology that is not understood must be listed and defined, and the
source of the definition cited.
• All repor...
8
◊ Titles of subsequent preliminary PBL reports will contain PBL2b,
PBL 3b etc.
• The report must contain your return e-m...
9
• Hypothesis of what is the solution to the problem.
• Sound reasoning to substantiate your hypothesis.
• Answers to all...
10
List the references at the end of your research paper in alphabetical order. They
should be listed at the end of the pa...
11
Magills Medical Guide REF RC 41 .M34 2008 Also in Electronic Reference
Mayo Clinic Family Health Book REF RC81 .M473 20...
12
A = 765 – 689 points (100 – 90%)
B = 688 – 612 points (89 – 80%)
C = 611 – 536 points (79 – 70%)
D = 535 – 459 points (...
13
VARK is a short, simple inventory that has been well received by students and faculty alike
because its dimensions are ...
14
Tentative Lecture and Examination Schedule
Date Lecture Topic and Video Lecture Downloads
-----------------------------...
15
Tentative Lecture and Examination Schedule
(continued)
Date Lecture Topic
---------------------------------------------...
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Biology 358 — Neuroanatomy

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Biology 358 — Neuroanatomy

  1. 1. Course Information Packet Biology 358 — Neuroanatomy A Course Taught on a Modified Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Format Winter Term 2010—2011 Academic Year Science Bldg., Room 304 Professor: Bob Tallitsch, Ph.D. Office: 202 Science Bldg. e-mail (office): RobertTallitsch@augustana.edu Instant message screen name: rbtallitsch Office Phone: 794-3441 Home Phone: 764-8507 Required Material: Crossman, A.R., Neary, D. (2010) Neuroanatomy: An Illustrated Colour Text Tallitsch, R.B. (2011) Neuroanatomy Lecture Notes. (7’th ed.) Rock Island: Augustana Press. Our Joint Commitments: By deciding to take this class you are making an overt decision—namely that you will attend this class each and every day it is scheduled, and that you will do your best to succeed in this class. By deciding to teach this class, I too am making an overt decision—namely that I will offer class sessions that are worth attending, and that I will do my best to help you succeed. If I am not keeping this commitment let me know, just as I will let you know that you are not keeping your commitment, if that is the case. 1. Course Objectives: Although the individual lecture objectives are explained at the beginning of each lecture in the Neuroanatomy Lecture Notes, my overall course objectives are summarized as follows. At the completion of this course you should have: • Had fun and enjoyed the term! • Learned how to develop an integrated knowledge base • Further increased your overall problem solving skills, including your ability to define problems, gather and evaluate information, and develop solutions • Further developed effective knowledge acquisition skills • Further developed your team skills • Further increased your communication skills • Further developed your self-assessment skills • Further increased your ability to assess the work of others • Further increased your ability to identify, find and use appropriate resources
  2. 2. 2 • Developed a 3-dimensional understanding of neuroanatomical relationships within the brain and spinal cord • Developed an understanding of how the various anatomical and functional subdivisions of the nervous system work together in the production of neurological activity, both conscious and subconscious. • Increased your test taking abilities • A firm understanding of the terminology utilized in anatomy in general, and neuroanatomy in particular • Accomplished the specific goals listed at the beginning of each lecture section, as outlined in the Neuroanatomy Lecture Notes. 2. What you can expect of me this term: I am a firm believer that a college education is a two-way street. As a professor, I hope you learn things from me. However, I also hope that I will learn things from you. In addition, I don’t think it is appropriate to list what I expect of you without telling you what you can (and should) expect of me. So, during this term you can expect that I will: • I was told the following by a very good friend who was an excellent teacher: “Students won’t give a damn about what you know until they know you give a damn.” You can and should expect me to give a damn—about you as a person and as a student. • Do my best to make this term fun! • Keep the class interesting, organized, and functioning in an open environment of mutual respect. • Believe, foster and convey the attitude that everyone enrolled in this class has the ability to succeed if they try. • Care about your progress in this class. • Do my best to write examinations that aren’t tricky, but are fair and test what you know rather than what you don’t. However, if I do not achieve this goal, I will do my best to be a good listener as you discuss with me why you interpreted any and all questions in a particular way. I will also do my best to rectify the problem as much as possible. • Return all graded tests and quizzes to you by the next class period. • Understand that my class is not the only class you are taking this term, and that you have an academic and personal life outside of my classroom. • Be fair and treat all students with respect. • Set a standard of high expectations and then help you live up to them. • Point out patterns and relationships between concepts covered in this class, as well as link ideas and facts to previous knowledge. 3. Neuroanatomy will be taught this year as a “blended” course. Because neuroanatomy is such a “content rich” course I have always been concerned about having to spend so much time in class passing information from me to the students and not having enough time (in class) to make sure that you, the student, really understand the information you need to know. So…this year you are participating in a grand experiment. Neuroanatomy will be
  3. 3. 3 taught in a manner unlike anything you have had in the Biology Department thus far. In this class you will • Use the Index and Table of Contents in your textbook to determine what to read  I would advise, however, that you do the reading after listening to the video lecture • Download the latest version of QuickTime Player  If you are a Macintosh user • Go to http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/ • Follow the instructions to download the version of QuickTime Player that matches your system software  If you are a Windows user • Go to http://quicktime-download.info/ • Follow the instructions to download the version of QuickTime Player that matches your system software • Access the lectures on line.  Go to www.augustana.edu/users/bitallitsch  Click on “Neuroanatomy” and then click on the “Video Download Page” link in the bottom right-hand corner of the subpage  Click on the appropriate video title and download the QuickTime video  You will listen to the video lecture anytime you want, anywhere you want, as long as you do so before class starts • You will come to class prepared to  Ask any questions you might have concerning the lecture material  Verbally answer questions and participate in classroom “think sessions” that will help you understand the material covered in the QuickTime video lectures • Take weekly quizzes to demonstrate that you have indeed listened to the video lectures  These quizzes will be worth 10 points each  You will be able to drop your lowest 10-point quiz  Quiz question format will vary • True-false • Multiple-choice • Picture identification 4. Unit Exams: Exams will include a variety of questions, ranging from true-false, multiple choice, multiple uglies, essay and picture identification utilizing copies of the unmarked serial sections included in your lecture note outline. Two unit exams will be given, with each being worth 100 points. Both exams will be counted in your total point score. (Help sessions are scheduled the evening before the exam. All help sessions are scheduled for the regularly schedule lecture room, and will begin at 7 p.m. and will continue until all questions are answered.)
  4. 4. 4 5. Quizzes: Eight quizzes will be given throughout the term. The first quiz, which cannot be dropped, covers terminology and is a 20-point quiz. The seven remaining quizzes are all 10-point quizzes. You may drop the lowest score of these seven quizzes. These quizzes will test only your knowledge of the video lecture material that has been covered since the most recent lecture exam or most recent quiz, whichever time period is the shortest. These quizzes may be multiple choice, picture labeling, and/or short answer format. Make-ups are not allowed under any circumstances; any missed quiz automatically becomes your dropped quiz. 6. Final Exam: A comprehensive final exam will be given during the regularly scheduled time slot for G-period classes: (Wednesday, 16 February, 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.) in the regularly scheduled lecture room. The exam will be approximately 50% new material (material not tested in a unit examination since the 2'nd unit exam) and 50% comprehensive material. Possible comprehensive essay problem-solving questions for the final will be handed out during the 9th or 10th week of classes. The final examination will be worth 200 points. A help session is scheduled the evening before the final exam. This session is scheduled for the regularly schedule lecture room, and will begin at 7 p.m. and will continue until all questions are answered. 7. Practice Exams: You may access practice exams and print them out for your review from my web page. The address for the web page is as follows: http://www.augustana.edu/users/bitallitsch 8. Problem-Based Learning Assignments: All students are expected to be in class for each PBL work session—whether initial sessions, second sessions, or final work days. It is the group leader’s role to notify me of any and all students missing on PBL days. Any and all absences on PBL days will be taken into account in determining final course grades. a. PBL Work Groups: You have been randomly assigned to a PBL work group (see A to Z list attached to first PBL problem). During the first week of class you are to meet as a group and assign a PBL Work Group leader, and notify me, via e- mail, as to the name of the leader. The role of the group leader is outlined below. b. Three times during the term you will be assigned a PBL set. Each preliminary report is worth 10 points (30 points for the term), and each secondary preliminary report is worth 10 points (30 points per term). Each final report is worth 70 points (210 total points for the term). All students are expected to be in class for each PBL work session—whether initial sessions, second sessions, or final work days. It is the group leader’s role to notify me of any and all students missing on PBL days. Any and all absences on PBL days will be taken into account in determining final course grades. c. The problems are designed in a format such that you will be required to seek out information beyond that provided to you in lecture.
  5. 5. 5 d. Each PBL group must choose a leader. The PBL group leader serves several important functions. Among these functions are: • Facilitator of group meetings. The group leader is the one member in the PBL group that is to contact other members of the group and arrange meetings to work on the PBL sets. • Facilitator of group meetings. The group leader is the one member in the PBL group that is to contact other members of the group and arrange meetings to work on the PBL sets. • Facilitator of group progress. The group leader will coordinate, in conjunction with the members in his/her group, the tasks to be completed by each member of the group. In doing so, the group leader will also ◊ Keep the process enjoyable and rewarding for team members ◊ Make sure each member has a role and works with the team leader to make sure that each member is performing within that role ◊ Ensure that all team members can articulate what has been learned ◊ Manage the group’s time to make sure all meetings are effective ◊ Manage and work to resolve stress and conflict ◊ Control the process and its pacing; keep members focused ◊ Maintain accountability for the overall performance of the team ◊ Contribute to the group and actively learn • Facilitator of group problems. The group leader is the individual responsible for participation of group members. If the group feels that it has a member that is not participating adequately it is the responsibility of the group leader to bring this to my attention. At this time the group leader, the individual in question, and I will meet and try to facilitate a solution to the problem. If necessary a meeting with the entire PBL group will be held to facilitate the problem. • The group leader is responsible for e-mailing in the final paper. e. Each group member will be asked to complete one or more tasks that will help accomplish the tasks needed to successfully complete the PBL. These roles and tasks are: • Researchers—These members (typically 2 or 3) are responsible for doing research on the presented problem. (Note: These are not the only members responsible for doing the research—rather they are the ones that will be responsible for coordinating the research and for doing the bulk of the research for the problem.) In addition, they are responsible for getting all information to the typists in a timely fashion.
  6. 6. 6 • Typist(s)—This member (or members, depending upon the size of the report) is responsible for typing some or all of the final report for submission. The typist is responsible for getting the final draft to the editor in a timely fashion for initial reading. • Editor—This member works with other members of the group to determine what is, and isn’t to be included in the final report. However, when a controversy develops, the editor has the final say. • Copy editor (proofreader)—This member is responsible for proofreading the final copy and getting all necessary corrections back to the typists in a timely manner. The typists are then to make any and all necessary corrections, and get a corrected copy to the copy editor. When all corrections have been made, the copy editor is responsible for getting the final copy to the group leader for submission on the day the report is required. f. On the day the PBL is assigned the class will break up into PBL groups and do some preliminary work on the problem. Before the start of class on the assigned class session, PBL group members must e-mail their individual preliminary report to my e-mail account as a MS Word attachment. Make sure of the following when you send the e-mail: • The subject line of the e-mail must be as follows: Neuroanatomy_PBL. • Please make sure that your name and e-mail address is on the top of each page of the report. • The title of the MS Word attachment must follow the following format: ◊ Lastname_firstname_Neuroanatomy_PBL1a ◊ Titles of subsequent preliminary PBL reports will contain PBL2a, PBL 3a etc. • The report must contain your return e-mail address on the first page immediately beneath your name and I.D. number. The preliminary report must contain the following information: • Possible hypothesis of what is wrong with the patient (maximum of 2-3 pages in length, not counting bibliography). • What you will need to find out in order to prove or disprove your preliminary hypothesis, and where you will look to find this information.
  7. 7. 7 • Any terminology that is not understood must be listed and defined, and the source of the definition cited. • All reports (both preliminary and final reports) must involve a minimum of three references. A minimum of two different text references must be used for each report (both preliminary and final reports). Your required lecture text may be one of these text references. It is advised that your second text reference be obtained from the reference section of the library. • If the final bibliography list has more than three references the ratio of texts to internet references must be 50-50. (i.e. No more than ½ of the references may come from the internet.) • It is expected that each member of the group will review all of the group’s preliminary hypotheses prior to coming to class the day the preliminary reports are due. g. After the preliminary report is due the second part of the problem will be handed out. The class will again break into PBL groups and do further preliminary work on the problem in class. In this session the group will now: • Determine how the additional information has changed any or all of the preliminary hypothesis, and why. • Determine the course of action the group will take in order to solve the problem. • Divide up the work that needs to be completed in order to solve the problem. h. On the day the PBL is assigned the class will break up into PBL groups and do some preliminary work on the problem. Before the start of class on the assigned class session, PBL group members must e-mail their individual preliminary report to my e-mail account as a MS Word attachment. Make sure of the following when you send the e-mail: • The subject line of the e-mail must be as follows: Neuroanatomy_PBL. • Please make sure that your name and e-mail address is on the top of each page of the report. • The title of the MS Word attachment must follow the following format: ◊ Lastname_firstname_Neuroanatomy_PBL1b
  8. 8. 8 ◊ Titles of subsequent preliminary PBL reports will contain PBL2b, PBL 3b etc. • The report must contain your return e-mail address on the first page immediately beneath your name and I.D. number. The secondary must contain the following information: • If your preliminary hypothesis has changed you must state how your preliminary hypothesis has changed, and why. However, if your preliminary hypothesis has not changed, then you must state how the additional information has supported and clarified your preliminary hypothesis. • What you will need to find out in order to prove or disprove your current hypothesis, and where you will look to find this information. • Any new terminology that is not understood must be listed and defined, and the source of the definition cited. • Citations for any and all sources utilized, including your textbook. All reports (both preliminary and final reports) must involve a minimum of three references. A minimum of two different text references must be used for each report (both preliminary and final reports). Your required lecture text may be one of these text references. It is advised that your second text reference be obtained from the reference section of the library. • If the final bibliography list has more than three references the ratio of texts to internet references must be 50-50. (i.e. No more than ½ of the references may come from the internet.) • A division of the work that needs to be completed in order to solve the problem, and who will accomplish each task. In addition to your listing of the group’s division of labor in your secondary report, please list the division of labor on the final paper. i. As published in the course schedule, each group is required to submit a final report again by e-mail (maximum of 5-7 pages in length not counting bibliography) before the start of the appropriate class period. (It would be advisable for the group to keep at least one back-up copy on computer disc.) The group report is to contain at least the following: • Division of labor of all group members, plus e-mail addresses of the entire group; please separate each e-mail address by a comma
  9. 9. 9 • Hypothesis of what is the solution to the problem. • Sound reasoning to substantiate your hypothesis. • Answers to all questions raised in parts 1, 2 and 3 of the PBL. • Citations for any and all sources utilized, including your textbook. All reports (both preliminary and final reports) must involve a minimum of three references. A minimum of two different text references must be used for each report (both preliminary and final reports). Your required lecture text may be one of these text references. It is advised that your second text reference be obtained from the reference section of the library. • If the final bibliography list has more than three references the ratio of texts to internet references must be 50-50. (i.e. No more than ½ of the references may come from the internet.) • Alphabetical listing of all members of the group on the first page, as well as the tasks assigned to each member of the group. j. No late preliminary, secondary or final reports will be accepted. k. All material utilized in the construction of preliminary and final reports must be properly cited, both in the body of the PBL report as well as at the end, in a reference section, utilizing Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style. The CSE Manual provides models for documenting electronic journal articles and books, some of which are available on the World Wide Web and by FTP and gopher. The Council of Science Editors has established conventions for citing electronically published articles and books, and you are encouraged to follow them as outlined in the CSE Manual. When you cite other Internet sources, use the guidelines in this section. All examples are given in name year system. Citations in CSE style can be created through RefWorks, the bibliographic citation manager accessed through the Tredway Library homepage. If you have not used RefWorks before, you will be asked to create an individual account using your Augustana username and password. Be sure to choose the CSE name year option for appropriate formatting. Citations can be imported from all databases into RefWorks. Use the guide on the RefWorks page for directions to each individual database. Even if you use RefWorks, you are ultimately responsible for the formatting of your document. Use the print copy of the CSE style manual, titled Scientific Style and Format: The CSE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers, found on 2nd floor of the library at REF T11 .S386 2006 as your final guide for all style questions.
  10. 10. 10 List the references at the end of your research paper in alphabetical order. They should be listed at the end of the paper but before any appendixes or explanatory notes. For citation examples go to the following electronic resource provided by the library: http://www.augustana.edu/library/Research/Guides/CSE-AnBibStyle.html Need more help? Contact Connie Ghinazzi at 7494 or any librarian at the reference desk at 7206. l. Reference Resources: Science is found under Q in the reference collection on the 2nd floor. There are many dictionaries, handbooks and encyclopedias specific to scientific disciplines. The R section (Medicine) will provide medical texts and reference books useful in completing your PBL assignments. Because of the large number of students using these materials simultaneously, please use all titles at the north end of 2nd floor in the library. Additional full-text biomedical reference books are available in Credo Reference, Stat RefHealth, PubMed Books, and Spring Medicine E-Book Collection. All are found through electronic reference link at www.augustana.edu/library . Browse these titles and those around it in the reference collection: American Medical Association Complete Medical Encyclopedia REF RC81 .A2 A497 2003 Atlas of Human Anatomy REF QM 25 .T56 2007 Cecil Textbook of Medicine REF RC 46 .C423 2008 Conn’s Current Therapy REF RM 101 .C87 2009 Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment REF RC71 .C976 2010 Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary REF R121 .D73 2007 Encyclopedia of Health and Behavior REF R726.5 .E53 2004 Encyclopedia of Muscle and Skeletal Systems and Disorders REF RC925.5 .S29 2005 Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine REF RC1206 .O355 2005 Encyclopedia of Women's Health REF RA778 .E5825 2004 Gale Encyclopedia of Neurological Disorders REF RC334 .G34 2005 Gray's Anatomy REF QM23.2 .G73 2008 Gross Anatomy in the Practice of Medicine REF QM 23.2 .S525 1994 Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine REF RC46 .H333 2008 Human Body in Health and Disease REF QP 34.5 .T495 2010
  11. 11. 11 Magills Medical Guide REF RC 41 .M34 2008 Also in Electronic Reference Mayo Clinic Family Health Book REF RC81 .M473 2009 McMinn’s Clinical Atlas of Human Anatomy REF QM25 .M23 2008 Merck Manual REF RC55 .M4 2006 Merck Home Health Guide Muscular System REF QP321 .M8965 2004 Nurse's Drug Handbook 2005 REF RM125 .N875 2005 Orthopaedic Knowledge Update REF RD 731 .O78 2005 Principles of Athletic Training REF RC 1210 .A75 2011 Professional Guide to Diseases REF RT 65 .P69 2009 Professional Guide to Signs and Symptoms REF RC 69 .P77 2011 Spine in Sports REF RD533 .S69 1996 Sports Medicine Consult REF RC1211 .S663 2009 Sports Medicine for the Primary Care Physician REF RC 1210 .S73 2004 Vander’s Human Physiology REF QP34.5 .W47 2008 Evaluating Web Resources: Before including a web page as evidence for your diagnosis , make sure you can defend it as a reliable source by answering these questions: Accuracy: Are sources listed? Is the information fact or opinion? Can the conclusions be verified independently? Authority: Is an author cited? What are their qualifications? Does the site have a purpose, affiliation or obvious bias? Expert Opinion: Do other experts agree? What are the links to and from this site? Coverage: How recent is the information? Is that acceptable? m. All reports (both preliminary and final reports) must involve a minimum of three references. A minimum of two different text references must be used for each report (both preliminary and final reports). Your required lecture text may be one of these text references. It is advised that your second text reference be obtained from the reference section of the library. n. Additional details are to be found elsewhere in this information packet. 9. Grades: Grades will be determined on a straight percentage scale out of a possible 765 points: 200 from lecture exams, 200 from comprehensive final, 20 points from the terminology quiz, 60 points from the seven 10-point weekly quizzes (7 quizzes worth 10 points each with lowest 10-point quiz grade dropped), 270 points from the PBL sets (30 from preliminary reports, 30 from secondary reports, 210 from final reports), and 15 points from completing the VARK assessment, as listed below. Please be advised that class attendance and participation do count when computing final grades, especially in borderline cases.
  12. 12. 12 A = 765 – 689 points (100 – 90%) B = 688 – 612 points (89 – 80%) C = 611 – 536 points (79 – 70%) D = 535 – 459 points (69 – 60%) F = below 459 points (below 60%) 10. Cheating Policy: Any individual suspected of, or caught cheating will receive a “0” grade for that examination and a “F” grade overall for the course. In addition the Dean of Students Office and the Office of the Provost will be notified, in writing, of the name of the student and the circumstances of the cheating incident. For review of this policy please read through Inside Augustana. 11. Class Attendance and Decorum: a. Class Attendance: Excessive absences will be taken into account in determining a student’s final grade. b. Late arrivals: I understand that there will be times when you just can’t get to class on time. That’s normal, and no big deal, as long as it doesn’t become a habit. If and when you do arrive late, please enter the classroom via the back door, located on the 4th floor immediately above the lecture room. c. Class Decorum: i. Eating and drinking in class is allowed, provided you do not disturb your neighbors. Please be careful of spills etc., and please remove all trash, cups and wrappers from the classroom. ii. OK—so I’m old fashioned—I admit it. Because of this, old habits die hard. I was taught that gentlemen do not wear hats indoor—so hats are not allowed in lecture under any circumstances. iii. Please do not put your feet on the back of the chair in front of you. d. Cell Phones: Neither the ringing nor the answering of cell phones during class will be tolerated—so turn it off! 12. Required learning style assessment: Periodically students have come to me with questions on how they should study for one of the various courses I teach. During these discussions, it has come to my attention that many individuals (both students and faculty alike) are unaware of their learning style(s) and effective studying strategies that would work with their individual learning style(s). Therefore, everyone is required (15 points awarded only upon successful completion and posting of results) to access the VARK web site and take the VARK learning style assessment.
  13. 13. 13 VARK is a short, simple inventory that has been well received by students and faculty alike because its dimensions are intuitively understood and its applications are practical. Its use has helped both students and faculty alike. It has helped students earn more effectively, and it has helped faculty to become more sensitive to the diversity of teaching strategies necessary to reach all students. VARK is an acronym made from the initial letters of four sensory modal preferences (Visual, Aural, Read/write and Kinesthetic). Modal preferences are used by people when they are taking in or giving out information. For example some people prefer to “read about it,” others to talk or draw. Some have no strong preferences for any one mode. Although we have known for centuries about the different modes, this inventory, initially developed in 1987 by Neil Fleming at Lincoln University, New Zealand, was the first to systematically present a series of questions with help-sheets for students, teachers, employees, and others to use in their own way. It also sought to be advisory rather than diagnostic and predictive. To take the VARK on-line with automatic scoring, go to: http://www.vark-learn.com/english/index.asp This site also contains the list of study suggestions based on learning preferences. In order to obtain your 15 point reward for taking the VARK test you are to e-mail the information listed below to me before Monday of the second week of class. (Please make sure that the subject line in the e-mail contains the following: Neuroanatomy_VARK_score.) a. point total b. subtotals for the four categories c. learning preference(s) 13. Using “Track Changes” on MS Word: If you do not know how to use Track Changes, or view the bubble comments/changes in a MS Word document please go to ITS (or see me) and get the necessary instructions.
  14. 14. 14 Tentative Lecture and Examination Schedule Date Lecture Topic and Video Lecture Downloads --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 16 November Introduction to Problem-Based Learning; Course Information Packet handed out and discussed; Introduction to the gross anatomy of the brain. Download: Introduction to Brain Gross Anatomy (approx. 24 minutes) 18 November Quiz #1 (Terminology, 20 points); PBL #1, part 1 distributed; Introduction to the gross anatomy of the brain; Anatomy of the spinal cord; Brachial & Lumbosacral plexus; Long ascending tracts of the spinal cord Download: Spinal Cord Anatomy (approx. 12 minutes) Long Ascending Sensory Tracts: General Stuff (approx. 15 minutes) Dorsal Columns (approx. 13 minutes) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 23 November PBL #1, part 1 due; Quiz #2 (10 points); Anatomy of the spinal cord; Brachial plexus & Lumbosacral plexus; Long ascending tracts of the spinal cord Download: Spinothalamic Tracts (approx. 10 minutes) Spinocerebellar Tracts(approx. 12 minutes) 25 November No class – Thanksgiving break! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 30 November PBL #1, part 2 distributed; Long ascending tracts of the spinal cord; Long descending tracts of the spinal cord Download: Introduction to the Descending Motor Tracts (approx. 8 minutes) Corticobulbar and Lateral Corticospinal Tracts (approx. 10 minutes) Anterior Corticospinal Tracts (approx. 4 minutes) 2 December Quiz #3 (10 points); PBL #1, part 2 due; Long descending tracts of the spinal cord; Autonomic Nervous System Download: Neurology of UMN and LMN Lesions (approx. 8 minutes) Autonomic Nervous System(approx. 7 minutes) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 7 December Autonomic Nervous System; Medulla Download: Medulla (approx. 28 minutes) 9 December Quiz #4 (10 points); PBL #1 due; PBL #2, part 1 distributed; Medulla ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  15. 15. 15 Tentative Lecture and Examination Schedule (continued) Date Lecture Topic --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 14 December Lecture Exam #1; PBL #2, part 1 due 17 December at 8 a.m. 16 December PBL #2, part 2 distributed; Pons; Mesencephalon Download: Pons (approx. 17 minutes) Mesencephalon (approx. 35 minutes) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11 January PBL #2, part 2 due; Pons; Mesencephalon; Cerebellum Download: Cerebellum (approx. 35 minutes) 13 January Quiz #5 (10 points); Diencephalon; Hypothalamus & Subthalamus Download: Diencephalon (approx. 36 minutes) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 18 January PBL #2 due; PBL #3, part 1 distributed; Hypothalamus & subthalamus; Basal Ganglia Download: Basal Ganglia (approx. 32 minutes) 20 January Quiz #6 (10 points); PBL #3, part 1 due; Basal Ganglia; Visual System Download: Visual System (approx. 21 minutes) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 25 January Lecture Exam # 2 27 January PBL #3, part 2 distributed electronically; No class today, but go over lecture material dealing with Visual System; Auditory system; Vestibular System Download: Auditory Pathway (approx. 22 minutes) Vestibular Pathway (approx. 15 minutes) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 February PBL #3, part 2 due; Auditory system; Vestibular system; Limbic & Amygdaloid systems Download: Olfactory and Limbic Systems (approx. 11 minutes) 3 February Quiz #7 (10 points); Cerebrum Download: Cerebrum (approx. 8 minutes) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8 February PBL #3 due; Course evaluations; Final Exam questions distributed 10 February Quiz #8 (10 points); Course wrap-up ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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