Presentation for Local School Council
Neal Ansani – Physical/Speech/Language Therapist
Jessica Obringer – School Counselor
John Stauffer – Parent
Marjorie G...
Tipp E. Kal Middle School
 CPS
 Grades 6-8
 Low-income
 Student population:
 92% Hispanic/Latino
 Under-performing
...
Generally Recognized Types of
Disabilities:
1. Specific Learning Disorder
2. Speech or Language Impairments
3. Intellectua...
Core Tenets of Special Education:
1. Zero Reject
2. Nondiscriminatory Evaluation
3. Appropriate Education
4. Least Restric...
Students with disabilities participate in general education curriculum
Benefits of Inclusion:
1. Social and Communication ...
▪ Provide Multiple Means of Representation
▪ Perception
▪ Language, expressions, and symbols
▪ Comprehension
▪ Provide Mul...
Four Key Components:
▪ Screening
▪ Progress Monitoring
▪ Multi-level Prevention
System
 Primary
 Secondary
 Tertiary
▪ ...
▪ School-wide PBIS is:
▪ A multi-tiered framework for establishing the social culture and
behavioral supports needed for a...
Definition: “A disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved
in understanding or in using language...
Middle School Considerations: New sixth graders can expect significant change and
challenges.
▪ Students will be on the mo...
Speech/Language Therapist
▪ Work with teachers to identify where intervention is required.
▪ Address where LD is complicat...
Middle School Considerations: Students with mathematics difficulties may encounter
struggles in science and enrichment cou...
▪ Developmental disability that usually
manifests by the age of three
▪ Affects verbal and nonverbal communication
skills
...
General Education & Special Education Teachers
▪ Promote friendships through group activities (Turnbull et
al., 2013)
▪ In...
General Education Teacher
▪ Discuss appropriate classroom behavior
(Understanding Autism, 2013)
Speech/Language Therapist
...
▪ Definitions:
▪ IDEA
▪ Legal
▪ Wide Range in Impairments
▪ Low Vision
▪ Functionally Blind
▪ Totally Blind
▪ Causes
▪ Con...
Special/ General Education Teacher
▪ Communication
▪ Expanded Core Curriculum (Turnbull et al., 2013)
▪ Organize the class...
Special/ General Education Teacher
▪ Inclusive in the general education classroom
▪ Group work (IRIS Center, 2014; Turnbul...
 Professional Development
 Unification of educators, administrators, and professionals
understandings of students with d...
United States Department of Education. (2012). ED data express. Retrieved 6/9/2014, Retrieved from
http://eddataexpress.ed...
Accommodations to the physical environment: Setting up a classroom for students with visual disabilities.
Retrieved June 1...
Serving students with visual impairments:the importance of collaboration. Retrieved June 10, 2014,
Retrieved from http://i...
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Team 3

  1. 1. Presentation for Local School Council
  2. 2. Neal Ansani – Physical/Speech/Language Therapist Jessica Obringer – School Counselor John Stauffer – Parent Marjorie Grace Tagare – General Education Teacher Jeffrey Batt – Special Education Teacher
  3. 3. Tipp E. Kal Middle School  CPS  Grades 6-8  Low-income  Student population:  92% Hispanic/Latino  Under-performing  High Parental Involvement
  4. 4. Generally Recognized Types of Disabilities: 1. Specific Learning Disorder 2. Speech or Language Impairments 3. Intellectual Disabilities 4. Emotional or Behavior Disorder 5. Other health impairments 6. Other disabilities combined
  5. 5. Core Tenets of Special Education: 1. Zero Reject 2. Nondiscriminatory Evaluation 3. Appropriate Education 4. Least Restrictive Environment 5. Procedural Due Process 6. Parent and Student Participation Four Outcomes of Special Education: 1. Equality of Opportunity 2. Full Participation 3. Independent Living 4. Economic Self-Sufficiency
  6. 6. Students with disabilities participate in general education curriculum Benefits of Inclusion: 1. Social and Communication Skills 2. Positive Peer Interactions 3. Improved Academics 4. Mastery of Curriculum Greater success in achieving desired outcomes of Special Education
  7. 7. ▪ Provide Multiple Means of Representation ▪ Perception ▪ Language, expressions, and symbols ▪ Comprehension ▪ Provide Multiple Means of Action and Expression ▪ Physical action ▪ Expression and communication ▪ Executive function ▪ Provide Multiple Means of Engagement ▪ Recruiting Interest ▪ Sustaining effort and persistence ▪ Self-regulation (National Center on Universal Design for Learning) Flickr.com
  8. 8. Four Key Components: ▪ Screening ▪ Progress Monitoring ▪ Multi-level Prevention System  Primary  Secondary  Tertiary ▪ Data-based Decision Making Tertiary Level of Prevention (~5% of Students) Secondary Level of Prevention (~18% of Students) Primary Level of Prevention (~80% of Students)
  9. 9. ▪ School-wide PBIS is: ▪ A multi-tiered framework for establishing the social culture and behavioral supports needed for a school to achieve behavioral and academic outcomes for all students. ▪ Evidence-based features of SWPBIS ▪ Prevention ▪ Define and teach positive social expectations ▪ Acknowledge positive behavior ▪ Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior ▪ On-going collection and use of data for decision-making ▪ Continuum of intensive, individual intervention supports. ▪ Implementation of the systems that support effective practices (Horner, 2014)
  10. 10. Definition: “A disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written.” (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2004) ▪ Constitutes the largest share of disabilities served by IDEA (42.9%) alone or in combination with other disabilities, disorders or impairments ▪ Deficiencies in academic achievement: o Reading (4-8% of children) o Mathematics (6-11%) o Combination (50% w/dyscalculia also have reading challenges). ▪ Distinct from and not indicative of deficiencies in intelligence. ▪ Positive correlation with short-term/long-term/working-memory issues. ▪ No correlation with mental health problems, although there is a higher incidence of social and emotional challenges and anxiety ▪ Nature and nurture are both causative factors: o Neurological/structural brain differences w/genetic link >50% for reading o Quality of instruction both at home and in the schools. (Turnbull et al., 2013)
  11. 11. Middle School Considerations: New sixth graders can expect significant change and challenges. ▪ Students will be on the move, and responsible to adhere to a schedule. ▪ It’s the end of a single teacher responsible for teaching all core subjects. ▪ Reading comprehension challenges may impact social studies and science. General Education Teacher ▪ Teachers must recognize a shared responsibility for reading. ▪ Academic deficiencies should be identified for specific reading components. ▪ Teachers should use best practices of UDL such as differentiated instruction. ▪ Social studies/science teachers should make use of the snowball technique. ▪ Use curriculum-based measurement to track progress. (Turnbull et al., 2013) ▪ Use formative assessments frequently, altering instruction methods. Special Education Teacher ▪ Work with general education teachers to incorporate SRSD to promote understanding/engagement of text to draw conclusions. (IRIS Center, 2014) ▪ Have students work in groups to read new material, fostering understanding by extracting the who, what, where, when, why, and how of the readings.
  12. 12. Speech/Language Therapist ▪ Work with teachers to identify where intervention is required. ▪ Address where LD is complicated by other impairments/disorders. ▪ Work with students who need oral skills help/new vocabulary challenges. School Counselor ▪ Support students and offer advice for the IEP. ▪ Students with learning disabilities have higher levels of anxiety than those without. Focus on management of classroom anxiety. Parents ▪ Need to be active and engaged members of their children’s education. ▪ Teachers/parents need to know best/preferred method of communication. ▪ Need to know how to support their students’ learning at home and facilitate progress. All stakeholders need to actively participate in IEPs. Teachers need to partner and plan. Parents need to know that they are not passive bystanders. (Turnbull et al., 2013)
  13. 13. Middle School Considerations: Students with mathematics difficulties may encounter struggles in science and enrichment courses which require measurement and facility with decimals and fractions. General Education Teacher ▪ Scaffold key concepts when introducing new material, use chunking. ▪ Employ modeling: I do, We do, You do. Circulate to assist and assess. Special Education Teacher ▪ Identify students with working memory issues. ▪ Develop or employ graphic organizers, mnemonic devices & technologies. ▪ Work with students in small groups/1:1 to break down complex problems. Speech/Language Therapist ▪ Focus on receptive language disorders which make word problems difficult. School Counselor ▪ As with reading: provide IEP support, and address student anxiety issues. Parents ▪ Learn new material and how it’s taught to effectively assist w/homework. (Turnbull et al., 2013)
  14. 14. ▪ Developmental disability that usually manifests by the age of three ▪ Affects verbal and nonverbal communication skills ▪ Distinct characteristics include: ▪ Atypical language development ▪ Atypical social development ▪ Differences in intellectual function ▪ Movement and sensory disorders ▪ Repetitive behavior ▪ Problem behavior (self-injurious and aggressive) ▪ Can occur among all intelligence levels (Turnbull et al., 2013)
  15. 15. General Education & Special Education Teachers ▪ Promote friendships through group activities (Turnbull et al., 2013) ▪ Incorporate visuals when lecturing (Turnbull et al., 2013) ▪ Explain using straightforward language (Understanding Autism, 2013) Physical/Speech/Language Therapist ▪ Encourage speaking in full sentences (IRIS Center, 2014; Turnbull et al., 2013) ▪ Become familiar with assistive technology Parent ▪ Be aware of nonverbal communication (Notbohm, 2012)
  16. 16. General Education Teacher ▪ Discuss appropriate classroom behavior (Understanding Autism, 2013) Speech/Language Therapist ▪ Use social stories to prepare students for interaction (Turnbull et al., 2013) School Counselor ▪ Develop a Functional Behavioral Assessment for aggressive and or self-injurious behavior (IRIS Center, 2014; Turnbull et al., 2013) ▪ Implement Positive Behavior Support (Turnbull et al., 2013)
  17. 17. ▪ Definitions: ▪ IDEA ▪ Legal ▪ Wide Range in Impairments ▪ Low Vision ▪ Functionally Blind ▪ Totally Blind ▪ Causes ▪ Congenital ▪ Adventitious (Turnbull et al., 2013) www.allaboutvision.com/
  18. 18. Special/ General Education Teacher ▪ Communication ▪ Expanded Core Curriculum (Turnbull et al., 2013) ▪ Organize the classroom with accommodations in mind (IRIS Center, 2014) ▪ Use of assistive technologies (IRIS Center, 2014; Turnbull et al., 2013) Speech/ Language Therapist ▪ Become familiar with AT devices (IRIS Center, 2014) School Counselor ▪ Encourage class participation (IRIS Center, 2014) Parent ▪ Active member of the IEP team ▪ Communicates with teachers ▪ Suggestions for working with and the learning needs of their child (IRIS Center, 2014) ▪ Assistive Technology Use www.clipartpal.com
  19. 19. Special/ General Education Teacher ▪ Inclusive in the general education classroom ▪ Group work (IRIS Center, 2014; Turnbull et al., 2013) ▪ Encourage class participation (Turnbull et al., 2013) Speech/ Language Therapist ▪ Work with the TVI to prepare the student for coursework and life outside of school ▪ Identify and explain social skills of communicating (IRIS Center, 2014) School Counselor ▪ Work on social issues ▪ Support student exploration of their environment (IRIS Center, 2014) Parent ▪ General likes and dislikes of their child (IRIS Center, 2014) ▪ Encouragement (IRIS Center, 2014) www.edlabandi.com/gallery-69-kids-playing-photos.html
  20. 20.  Professional Development  Unification of educators, administrators, and professionals understandings of students with disabilities  Assistive technology use in the classroom  Inclusion methods and teaching strategies  Use of visual and audio instructional methods  Communication  Open and fluid  Working as a team of educators, professionals, and families  Encourage family involvement in the IEP process  School Counseling and Paraprofessional Involvement
  21. 21. United States Department of Education. (2012). ED data express. Retrieved 6/9/2014, Retrieved from http://eddataexpress.ed.gov/state-tables-report.cfm Turnbull, A., Turnbull, H. R., Wehmeyer, M. L., & Shogren, K. A. (2012). Exceptional lives: Special education in today's schools (7th ed.). Kindle: Pearson HE, Inc. Florida Department of Education. (2011). Pennsylvania Association for Retarded Children (PARC) v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (1972). Retrieved 6/10/2014, Retrieved from http://www.pda- ese.org/pilot/foundations_course/foundationsPilot/unit1/act2b.htm National Center for Education Statistics. (2014). The condition of education - participation in education: Elementary/Secondary enrollment - children and youth with disabilities - indicator january (2014). Retrieved 6/11, 2014, Retrieved from http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cgg.asp Dragoo, K. (2011). Co-teaching in inclusive classrooms: A metasynthesis of qualitative research. NICHCY Research Summary, (81), Retrieved from http://nichcy.org/wp-content/uploads/docs/meta81.pdf
  22. 22. Accommodations to the physical environment: Setting up a classroom for students with visual disabilities. Retrieved June 10, 2014, Retrieved from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/v01- clearview/challenge/#content Functional Behavioral Assessment: Identifying the Reasons for Problem Behavior and Developing a Behavior Plan. (n.d.). Retrieved June 10, 2014, from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/fba/ Instructional accommodations:making the learning environment accessible to students with visual disabilities. Retrieved June 10, 2014, Retrieved from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/v02- successsight/challenge/#content Notbohm, Ellen. Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew. (2012). Retrieved June 09, 2014, from http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/100-day-kit/ten-things-every-child-autism- wishes-you-knew National Center on Universal Design for Learning. Universal Design for Learning Guidelines. Retrieved June 10, 2014. Retrieved from http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines/udlguidelines_graphicorganizer
  23. 23. Serving students with visual impairments:the importance of collaboration. Retrieved June 10, 2014, Retrieved from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/v03-focusplay/challenge/#content Turnbull, A. P., Turnbull, H. R., Wehmeyer, M. L., & Shogren, K. A. (2013). Exceptional lives: Special education in today's schools. Boston: Pearson. Pages: 50-51, 251, 404 Understanding Autism: A Guide for Secondary School Teachers (Part 1). (2013). Retrieved June 10, 2014, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yAAOI6JUsM What are some of the most common related services used in schools? (n.d.). Retrieved June 10, 2014, from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/rs/cresource/what-are-some-of-the-most-common-related- services-used-in-schools/rs_05/#content Center on Response to Intervention. Implementer Series: What is RTI?. Retrieved June 10, 2014. Retrieved from http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines/udlguidelines_graphicorganizer Horner. (March 2009). Overview of PBIS. Retrieved June 10, 2014. Retrieved from http://www.pbis.org/presentations

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