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News Judgment, Reputation,  Engagement, Advocacy              Spring 2012        Prof. Marie K. Shanahan        University...
What is news?• News is a report of recent events, of new  information.• Reporting the news is a public service.• News orig...
News judgment: 9 elements
Timeliness• Recent events have higher news value than  happenings in the past.                                          Im...
Impact• How many people are will be affected/influenced by  the subject of the story?                                     ...
ProminenceSignificant peopleor places areinvolved.  Photo by Flickr user BeckyF, used under a                  Creative Co...
ProximityHow close to “home” the news originates.
Conflict“Bad news:”Crime, strife, war,public discontent,protests,disagreements.        Image by photoxpress.com
NoveltyThe unusual, strange, unique or odd.                             Image via telegraph.co.uk
Consequence
CurrencyMore value is given to stories pertaining to issues ortopics that are in the spotlight of public concern rathertha...
Human InterestStories about individualsand groups of people andtheir problems, concerns,or achievements can stirempathy, i...
Explanatory Stories• The public benefits from professionally reported  information explaining issues, processes, trends an...
Data Visualization• Can be a useful tool in an explanatory story.• Helps audience understand complex statistics and  numbe...
http://www.visual-literacy.org/periodic_table/periodic_table.html
Multimedia StoryboardingThe best multimediastories are multi-dimensional.Contain elements ofaction, process, andpeople.Org...
What is a storyboard?• A visual sketch of your story/project, separated into  different parts so it can be organized.• Pic...
Online StoryboardingDivide your story into logical parts:•Lead or nut graph – the introduction•Profiles of the main person...
Create a new blog post!• Open a new browser window and start a new post  on our class blog.• Your post will have 3 section...
1. Your reputation• Perform a web search on yourself. For example, I  searched: “Marie Shanahan” and “Marie K.  Shanahan.”...
Read this article7 Steps For Journalists To Build Trust and Credibility with anhttp://www.poynter.org/how-tos/community-en...
2. Engaging your audienceOnce you have a work of journalism to publish, youneed to find an audience for your work. Journal...
Watch This VideoTED Talk featuring Seth Godin: The Tribes We Lead   http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_l...
Advocacy JournalismBrowse these two websites and read the bio of New YorkTimes columnist Nicholas Kristof (who will be spe...
3. Advocacy questions• Should journalists and their news organizations use  their communication resources and large audien...
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News Judgment, Reputation, Engagement, Advocacy

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Journalistic news judgment, a journalist's online reputation, engaging audiences and advocacy journalism.

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News Judgment, Reputation, Engagement, Advocacy

  1. 1. News Judgment, Reputation, Engagement, Advocacy Spring 2012 Prof. Marie K. Shanahan University of Connecticut
  2. 2. What is news?• News is a report of recent events, of new information.• Reporting the news is a public service.• News originates in three ways: naturally occurring events, planned activities, and reporter enterprise.• “Explanatory” stories should also be included as a form of news.
  3. 3. News judgment: 9 elements
  4. 4. Timeliness• Recent events have higher news value than happenings in the past. Image by photoxpress.com
  5. 5. Impact• How many people are will be affected/influenced by the subject of the story? Image by photoxpress.com
  6. 6. ProminenceSignificant peopleor places areinvolved. Photo by Flickr user BeckyF, used under a Creative Commons license
  7. 7. ProximityHow close to “home” the news originates.
  8. 8. Conflict“Bad news:”Crime, strife, war,public discontent,protests,disagreements. Image by photoxpress.com
  9. 9. NoveltyThe unusual, strange, unique or odd. Image via telegraph.co.uk
  10. 10. Consequence
  11. 11. CurrencyMore value is given to stories pertaining to issues ortopics that are in the spotlight of public concern ratherthan issues or topics that have little prevalence. Flickr photo by David Shankbone
  12. 12. Human InterestStories about individualsand groups of people andtheir problems, concerns,or achievements can stirempathy, interest andoccasionally, outrage, inthe reader or viewer.Human interest stories areoften the story behind thestory. Image by photoxpress.com
  13. 13. Explanatory Stories• The public benefits from professionally reported information explaining issues, processes, trends and events that affect their lives and communities.• Digital journalists can create interactive “crash- courses” on topics that are currently or repeatedly in the news, providing necessary background to give users reliable understanding.
  14. 14. Data Visualization• Can be a useful tool in an explanatory story.• Helps audience understand complex statistics and numbers.• Is used to communicate information clearly and effectively through graphical means.• Interactive maps are a common form of data visualization.
  15. 15. http://www.visual-literacy.org/periodic_table/periodic_table.html
  16. 16. Multimedia StoryboardingThe best multimediastories are multi-dimensional.Contain elements ofaction, process, andpeople.Organize anexplanatory story witha storyboard.
  17. 17. What is a storyboard?• A visual sketch of your story/project, separated into different parts so it can be organized.• Pictures and words depict what users can see and do on every screen• Visual representation helps you define the scope of your project• Forces you to think about focus of your story.
  18. 18. Online StoryboardingDivide your story into logical parts:•Lead or nut graph – the introduction•Profiles of the main person or people in the story•The event or situation•Any process or how something works•Pros and cons•History of the event or situation•Other relatedtopics/hyperlinks/resources/conversation
  19. 19. Create a new blog post!• Open a new browser window and start a new post on our class blog.• Your post will have 3 sections: Reputation, Engagement, Advocacy. Use SUBHEADS.• Follow the instructions on slides 20-25 and answer the questions in BOLD TYPE.• Make sure to include a visual element in your post, and hyperlinks, of course.
  20. 20. 1. Your reputation• Perform a web search on yourself. For example, I searched: “Marie Shanahan” and “Marie K. Shanahan.” What shows up your first page of results?• If available, click on the links about you. How would you rate your digital footprint? Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor, or Invisible. Why? How do you think your digital footprint reflects upon your reputation as a journalist?• How do you think you should conduct yourself (online and off) if you want/need sources and an audience to trust you?
  21. 21. Read this article7 Steps For Journalists To Build Trust and Credibility with anhttp://www.poynter.org/how-tos/community-engagement/122806/highlights-from-sxsw-7-steps-to-buildi
  22. 22. 2. Engaging your audienceOnce you have a work of journalism to publish, youneed to find an audience for your work. Journalists canuse the power of the web to create a communityaround the topic, if one doesn’t already exist.You can discuss/promote the work of journalism in“places” where your key audience gathers, includingsocial media sites, blogs and off-line events.Journalists are expected to be conversation leadersand moderators, and not just “broadcasters” ofinformation. How do you feel about this new role?Comfortable or uncomfortable? Why?
  23. 23. Watch This VideoTED Talk featuring Seth Godin: The Tribes We Lead http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html
  24. 24. Advocacy JournalismBrowse these two websites and read the bio of New YorkTimes columnist Nicholas Kristof (who will be speaking atUConn this month.)•CNN: The Freedom Project•Hartford Courant:Domestic Violence Project - Overcoming Battered Lives•Nicholas Kristof | UConn Reads
  25. 25. 3. Advocacy questions• Should journalists and their news organizations use their communication resources and large audience reach to champion “causes?”• If no, why? If yes, why? Can a journalist advocate a cause and still operate within the “objectivity/fairness/accuracy” standards of the profession?• Can “crusading” journalists go too far?• One perspective: http://www.ojr.org/ojr/people/robert/201112/2042/

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