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Introduction to invasive plants of
Cape Breton
Focus on Angelica: an emerging threat
When Good Plants Go Bad
invasiveplant...
invasiveplantscapebreton
Characteristics
Deceptively beautiful
Few or no natural predators
Short generation time (allows t...
Hogweed
Angelica
invasiveplantscapebreton
2
Direct threat to human health and
Property value.
invasiveplantscapebreton
invasiveplantscapebreton
Angelica : Direct threat to quality of land and landscape
Spreads extremely quickly.
Angelica Damage
invasiveplantscapebreton
Without angelica
After removing angelica
Early infection
invasiveplantscapebreton
Early invasion of angelica: high priority to save, still many natives present
Established colony
invasiveplantscapebreton
4
Hard to kill
Edible
Japanese Knotweed (Elephant Ears)
invasiveplantscapebreton
5
6
7
invasiveplantscapebreton
9
8
Purple Loosestrife
Wetlands killer
Tansy Ragwort
Livestock killer
invasiveplantscapebreton
invasiveplantscapebreton
Japanese Barberry
Forest killer
Suppresses re-growth
Thorny Thickets
Harbour Lyme Disease Ticks
E...
invasiveplantscapebreton
invasiveplantscapebreton
Priorities
Avoid politics/blame
Educate each other
Work with your neighbor
Prevent new infection
...
Colonizer plant
invasiveplantscapebreton
invasiveplantscapebreton
Even a few hours can make a difference.
Think about how many you prevent instead of how many are ...
invasiveplantscapebreton
Techniques (Angelica only)
Appropriate clothes/gloves/eye
protection
A small number of people may...
invasiveplantscapebreton
Pollinated seeds need
the plant’s energy
To mature, so cut the stem
and leaves off.
Soft blooms are
not yet fertile and
th...
Bag mature seeds
and burn, do NOT
send to the landfill.
Seedlings: let them compete
with each other. Pull the
survivors or...
invasiveplantscapebreton
invasiveplantscapebreton
“There is not
a moment
to lose.”
Capt. Jack Aubrey
2007
2013
invasiveplantscapebreton
BE PERSISTENT
invasiveplantscapebreton
Follow-up field workshop Sunday Sept.
15th
2pm 1st house on Plaister Mines Road. See
the Facebook...
invasiveplantscapebreton
invasiveplantscapebreton
Photo credits:
1 Kim Cuddington
2 Ontatio Invasive Species Council
3 http://www.naturenet.net
4 w...
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When good plants go bad: Major invasive plants of Cape Breton you can do something about.

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Invasive plants are a form of pollution that reproduces itself. They are projected to "grow" into a problem larger than simple habitat destruction, because they multiply on their own, without our influence once unleashed. This was an introductory presentation for the average person featuring Angelica sylvestris, purple loosestrife, Japanese barberry, Tansy ragwort and Japanese knotweed. The presentation was given at the Baddeck Library in Cape Breton Nova Scotia.

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When good plants go bad: Major invasive plants of Cape Breton you can do something about.

  1. 1. Introduction to invasive plants of Cape Breton Focus on Angelica: an emerging threat When Good Plants Go Bad invasiveplantscapebreton 1
  2. 2. invasiveplantscapebreton Characteristics Deceptively beautiful Few or no natural predators Short generation time (allows them to adapt) Huge number of easily spread seeds Live in many kinds of light, soil, moisture Often have more than one way to reproduce Taller than/shade out native plants Revealing names
  3. 3. Hogweed Angelica invasiveplantscapebreton 2 Direct threat to human health and Property value.
  4. 4. invasiveplantscapebreton
  5. 5. invasiveplantscapebreton Angelica : Direct threat to quality of land and landscape Spreads extremely quickly.
  6. 6. Angelica Damage invasiveplantscapebreton Without angelica After removing angelica Early infection
  7. 7. invasiveplantscapebreton Early invasion of angelica: high priority to save, still many natives present Established colony
  8. 8. invasiveplantscapebreton 4 Hard to kill Edible Japanese Knotweed (Elephant Ears)
  9. 9. invasiveplantscapebreton 5 6 7
  10. 10. invasiveplantscapebreton 9 8 Purple Loosestrife Wetlands killer
  11. 11. Tansy Ragwort Livestock killer invasiveplantscapebreton
  12. 12. invasiveplantscapebreton Japanese Barberry Forest killer Suppresses re-growth Thorny Thickets Harbour Lyme Disease Ticks Erosion
  13. 13. invasiveplantscapebreton
  14. 14. invasiveplantscapebreton Priorities Avoid politics/blame Educate each other Work with your neighbor Prevent new infection research plants before buying inspect fill dirt before accepting avoid contaminating new areas Get moving (great exercise) Unspoiled areas with high numbers of natives Colonizer plants: then from outside in to larger infections Streams, lakesides, wetlands, roadsides, very windy areas
  15. 15. Colonizer plant invasiveplantscapebreton
  16. 16. invasiveplantscapebreton Even a few hours can make a difference. Think about how many you prevent instead of how many are left.
  17. 17. invasiveplantscapebreton Techniques (Angelica only) Appropriate clothes/gloves/eye protection A small number of people may react work when overcast shower afterwards Work 48-72 hours after a good rain Try to pull the whole plant At least remove all seeds/flowers every year…timing is everything. Don’t leave flowers and immature seeds on stems Cut rest of plant to flat to the ground Suffocate seedlings or let them compete with each other.
  18. 18. invasiveplantscapebreton
  19. 19. Pollinated seeds need the plant’s energy To mature, so cut the stem and leaves off. Soft blooms are not yet fertile and the plant may be Pulled or cut down. invasiveplantscapebreton
  20. 20. Bag mature seeds and burn, do NOT send to the landfill. Seedlings: let them compete with each other. Pull the survivors or at least keep the plant from seeding. Mowing stimulates re-flowering. Pull, dig, or cut plant to the ground. invasiveplantscapebreton
  21. 21. invasiveplantscapebreton
  22. 22. invasiveplantscapebreton “There is not a moment to lose.” Capt. Jack Aubrey
  23. 23. 2007 2013 invasiveplantscapebreton BE PERSISTENT
  24. 24. invasiveplantscapebreton Follow-up field workshop Sunday Sept. 15th 2pm 1st house on Plaister Mines Road. See the Facebook page InvasivePlantsCapeBreton for more information. Please “like”. A blog of the same name is in development.
  25. 25. invasiveplantscapebreton
  26. 26. invasiveplantscapebreton Photo credits: 1 Kim Cuddington 2 Ontatio Invasive Species Council 3 http://www.naturenet.net 4 www.pittmeadows.bc.ca 5 ctnofa1982.blogspot.com 6 www.environetuk.com 7 www.invasive.org 8 http://www.stewardsofkleinstuck.org 9 www.invadingspecies.com All other photos by MB Whitcomb and David Quimby

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