The persuasive speech

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Structuring the persuasive speech.

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  • The persuasive speech

    1. 1. The persuasivediscourse (p.192-194)
    2. 2. What is a persuasive discourse?
    3. 3. What is a persuasive discourse?• A formal speech
    4. 4. What is a persuasive discourse?• A formal speech• Intends to persuade the listeners that the speakers opinion on an issue is the right one.
    5. 5. What is a persuasive discourse?• A formal speech• Intends to persuade the listeners that the speakers opinion on an issue is the right one.• It is supported with arguments backed up by statistics, examples and expert opinions.
    6. 6. What is a persuasive discourse?• A formal speech• Intends to persuade the listeners that the speakers opinion on an issue is the right one.• It is supported with arguments backed up by statistics, examples and expert opinions. The structure of a persuasive discourse is similar to that of a persuasive essay.
    7. 7. Introduction
    8. 8. Introduction• Begins with a grabber (rhetorical questions, provocative statements, short anecdotes).
    9. 9. Introduction• Begins with a grabber (rhetorical questions, provocative statements, short anecdotes).• At the end of the introduction provide a preview statement (thesis statement + three arguments).
    10. 10. Body
    11. 11. Body• The speakers three arguments are developed.
    12. 12. Body• The speakers three arguments are developed.• Each argument is introduced with a transition term.
    13. 13. Body• The speakers three arguments are developed.• Each argument is introduced with a transition term.• Back up your arguments with at least two of the following types of evidence: statistics, expert opinion, example.
    14. 14. Conclusion
    15. 15. Conclusion• Begins with a transition term (To conclude, in summary, to finish) followed by a summary statement (a rephrased summary statement).
    16. 16. Conclusion• Begins with a transition term (To conclude, in summary, to finish) followed by a summary statement (a rephrased summary statement).• The speaker ends with a clincher (connecting with the introduction, demonstrating the importance of a thesis statement, offering a solution).
    17. 17. Persuasive strategies
    18. 18. Persuasive strategies• Keep it short and simple.
    19. 19. Persuasive strategies• Keep it short and simple.• Repeat yourself.
    20. 20. Persuasive strategies• Keep it short and simple.• Repeat yourself.• Use transition terms (see p.198)
    21. 21. Persuasive strategies• Keep it short and simple.• Repeat yourself.• Use transition terms (see p.198)• Ask questions (rhetorical and directed).
    22. 22. A few donts
    23. 23. A few donts• Dont read your speech.
    24. 24. A few donts• Dont read your speech.• Dont stand in one place.
    25. 25. A few donts• Dont read your speech.• Dont stand in one place.• Dont talk to just one or two people in the audience.
    26. 26. A few donts• Dont read your speech.• Dont stand in one place.• Dont talk to just one or two people in the audience.• Dont avoid making eye contact.

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