STEAM in Youth Programming

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This presentation was given at Albany Public Library Staff Development Day in Albany, NY in on November 14, 2013. In this presentation, Margaret Portier shares some ideas for how to incorporate STEAM literacies in library programming for all ages.

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  • Budget 1.6 million (up from 300,000 since 2000)
    in 2011: ~56,000 items in circulation, total circ 300,000
    We all serve children - regardless of primary responsibility, directly or indirectly
  • Why is steam important?
    We live in an age rich with technology
    technology is becoming more complex and prevalent in our society
    connecting person-to-person occurs through physical and digital means
    social media and gadgets
    Technology requires more skill to use
    requires even more skill to manipulate and change
    as we are now, our interactions are restricted through the creations of others
    apps, software, hardware, etc.
    in order to take control of our own futures, it is becoming necessary that we learn how to rewrite the boundaries of our technologies so that we can interact with the world how WE want to, not just how someone else envisions
    This is especially important for children
    they grow up with technology
    their growth will be limited to what already “is” if they do not learn how to think about and create what “isn’t yet”
    People must become not just users, but makers as well
    If it doesn’t exist or isn’t quite right, make or adapt it to suit yourself
    In order to succeed in this world of technology and constant change, it is vitally important that children and adults develop skills in these STEAM subjects in order to shape the world they are growing into.
    STEAM LETS YOU SHAPE YOUR OWN FUTURE
    What about schools, don’t they teach these things?
    Of course they do
    formal instruction in STEAM subjects is a vital part of education
    students are required to be in school, libraries are primarily voluntary (parents are another thing)
    libraries are informal educational institutions
    we provide instruction through fun hands on experience
    a comfortable place to apply knowledge learned in school or to develop new skills that will help students retain knowledge
    old axiom, practice makes perfect - libraries offer a place for students to informally practice the application of knowledge and the thought processes and methods that develop deep understanding of subjects
    It is also part of our mission as a library to provide free and open access to ideas and information
    STEAM education is a vital part of that, by providing opportunities for children to access information and then apply the information to developing ideas and furthering their understanding
  • In case you need another argument in support of developing programs around STEAM literacies…
    In terms of supporting school-aged children, STEAM learning goes hand-in-hand with the Common Core shifts. ESPECIALLY: learn by doing, apply knowledge, read for information, deep understanding, and college and career readiness
    MATH
    Shift 1Focus
    Shift 2Shift 2 Coherence
    Shift 3Fluency
    Shift 4Deep Understanding
    Shift 5Application
    Shift 6Dual Intensity
    ENGLISH
    Shift 1Pre-K-5, Balancing Informational & Literary Texts
    Shift 26-12, Knowledge in the Disciplines
    Shift 3Staircase of Complexity
    Shift 4Text-based Answers
    Shift 5Writing from Sources
    Shift 6Academic Vocabulary
  • Storytime is the eye opener for young learners. Even before they walk, an effective story time can make a significant impact that will help physical as well as social and emotional development. Storytime increases children's social, communication, and literacy skills and introduces them to the world of STEAM. By exposing these young learners to STEAM subjects at this impressionable age, we are fostering a love to learn that they will carry with them throughout school and life.
    We read at least one nonfiction title in each story time and ask a lot of questions about the book to actively involve the children in the reading. We also read books that might be a step higher than normal, encouraging children to learn new words and concepts and to discuss what they mean.
    We offer five different story times each week for age groups: 0-1, 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, 4-5. Twice a year, we have a special Musical Family Storytime which is for families of all ages and involves a great deal of singing and rhyming as one of our most musical librarians is accompanied on the piano.
    Storytime is a very active and tactile experience where we encourage children and parents not just to listen, but to touch, hear, see, feel, and move. We use iPads in story time to incorporate these different types of learning while exposing children and their parents to new technology and the ways it can be utilized for developing pre and early literacy skills as well as gain a basic understanding in how this technology is used.
  • Making is big in our library. We have 3 makerspaces that have been developed out of community interests and learning needs. Making programs are excellent applications of steam literacy skills.
    Making things uses the STEM literacies
    Example:
    science - playdoh
    technology - circuits
    engineering - cardboard
    art - paint
    math - 3D modelling
  • Little Makers is a maker space and series of programs for children in the 5-8yr range based around making and developing STEAM and reading literacies.
    Programs include reading picture books and then performing experiments/projects:
    galaxy playdoh - making playdoh with glitter, then attaching it to a Makey Makey to explore a nasa program where you travel through the universe
    circuits with snap-circuits
    In the space in general:
    legos
    Roominate kits
    Goldie Blocks
    Misc materials for crafting
  • STEAM literacies are valuable for all age groups, not just kids.
    For adults, STEAM programming is an opportunity to:
    build new skills
    explore interests
    spend time with family
    develop ideas
    try new hobbies
    start building skills for a career
    etc.
    Also, it’s fun.
    Program examples:
    Kilowatt Challenge
    One-on-ones
    Sewing
    Project Make
    3D Modeling programs
    COming soon: robotics club, long term projects,
  • One-on-ones
  • STEAM in Youth Programming

    1. 1. MARGARET PORTIER DIRECTOR OF INNOVATIVE FAMILY SERVICES MPORTIER@FFLIB.ORG @TOPHILE POWERING YOUNG MINDS WITH NEW IDEAS. STEAM IN YOUTH PROGRAMMING
    2. 2. • SUBURBAN LIBRARY • CHARTERED TO SERVE 10,000 • SCHOOL DISTRICT HIGHLY RANKED IN SCIENCE AND MATH • SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY • ACTIVE VOLUNTEER BASE FAYETTEVILLE FREE LIBRARY
    3. 3. SCIENCE * TECHNOLOGY * ENGINEERING * ART * MATH WHAT IS STEAM?
    4. 4. COMMON CORE AND STEAM Common Core • Supports shifts in ELA and Mathematics • Learn by doing • Apply knowledge • Read for information STEAM • Opportunity to provide programming around these core subjects • Maker Culture • Learning for fun • Interesting
    5. 5. STEAMING UP STORYTIME • Read nonfiction books • Early literacy skills • Music, movement, and repetition • Coloring and crafts • Use technology • Counting
    6. 6. MAKING STEAM Making involves: • Science • Technology • Engineering • Art • Math
    7. 7. A MAKERSPACE FOR THE 5-8 CROWD. LITTLE MAKERS
    8. 8. STEAM POWERED CHILDREN’S PROGRAMMING • Young Scientists • Extreme Weather • Murder Mystery in the Library • Fancy Nancy Tutu Tea Party • Potions 101 • Smart Play • Takeapart Tuesdays
    9. 9. TEENS ON STEAM • LEGO Robotics • Creation Club • Secret Science Club • eTextiles • Strongest Bridge Challenge • 3D Design • Minecraft in the Library • Volunteers
    10. 10. IT’S NOT JUST FOR KIDS STEAM FOR ALL AGES
    11. 11. Any Questions? MARGARET PORTIER DIRECTOR OF INNOVATIVE FAMILY SERVICES MPORTIER@FFLIB.ORG @TOPHILE SUSAN CONSIDINE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SCONSIDINE@FFLIB.ORG FAYETTEVILLE FREE LIBRARY HOMEPAGE: WWW.FFLIB.ORG FAQS FOR LIBRARIANS: WWW.FFLIB.ORG/MAKERFAQS MAKING! WWW.FFLIB.ORG/MAKE TWITTER: @FAYETTEVILLELIB

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