Worksite health promotion 3.12.2009

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Worksite health promotion class, 3 December 2009

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Worksite health promotion 3.12.2009

  1. 1. Worksite
  2. 2. Programme (syllabus) Intro & Review of the literature (15 min) Case histories & Examples (5 min) Presentation of groupwork (5 min) Assisted groupwork in class (15 min) Discussion (10-15 min) 29/05/20142Workplace Health Promotion
  3. 3. review
  4. 4. HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED WHY WORKPLACE WELLNESS IS IMPORTANT? 29/05/20144Workplace Health Promotion
  5. 5. Google Headquarters in Zurich 29/05/20145Workplace Health Promotion
  6. 6. A world of workaholics Globally, 60% of the world’s population is accessible directly or indirectly through the workplace, and 60% of our waking hours are spent in the workplace (Batt, 2009; Blake & Lloyd, 2008) 29/05/20146Workplace Health Promotion
  7. 7. Social & economic costs costs Occupational illness: £30 billion (3% GDP) Workplace absence: 175 million working days Economic cost: £13.4 billion UK financial case: (PriceWaterhouseCoopers, 2008) Roi (return on investment) -$4 healthcare costs -$5 absenteeism costs / every dollar invested in 3- 5 yrs (Serxner, Anderson & Gold, 2004) 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 7
  8. 8. Positive outcomes  CSR (Batt, 2009; Blake & Lloyd, 2008; Pronk & Kottke, 2009)  Productivity (reduced absenteeism & presenteeism) <= MORE DATA! CONTROVERSIAL DATA (Marshall, 2004)  Staff retention & recruitment  Reduction of accidents and injuries  Weight management (Anderson29/05/20148Workplace Health Promotion
  9. 9. Prevention rather than cure 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 9
  10. 10. Types 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion10
  11. 11. workplace wellness activities  Active/green commute  Exercise breaks, PA, walking (Abraham & Graham-Rowe, 2009)  Diet / Healthy food (obesity: Anderson et al. 2009)  Relaxation / anti-stress  HRA and advices (Batt, 2009) 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 11
  12. 12. Common workplace wellness programs strategies  Health checks  Educational programs (theory based)  Motivational prompts (short-term effective)  Wrkplace exercise programmes (i.e. Trainer Max)  Incentive-based  Individualized counseling vs. self-directed beh. change (Aittasalo et al., 2004) (Marshall, 2004) 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 12
  13. 13. A few examples  KPT-CPT Trainer Max http://www.allenatore- personale.ch/  Well@Work  Fit for Work (Europe) http://www.fitforworkeurope. eu/ 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 13
  14. 14. Determinants
  15. 15. Key determinants (1)  Recruitment strategy (promotion)  Two-step strategy (Plotnikoff et al., 2005)  Comprehensive recruitment plan (Thompson et al. 2006)  Involvement of HR & CEO & endorsement (Franklin, 2002; Prinz et al. 2001; Thompson, 2006)  Couselling (Aittasalo et al., 2004)  Incentives (price)  Buis et al., 2009; Marshall, 2004; Plotnikoff et al. 2005; Serxner, Anderson & Gold, 2004; Spittaels et al., 2007;  Flexibility (time mngmt & delivery mode)  Blake & Lloyd, 2008; Chinn et al., 2006; Thompson et al., 2006; Prinz et al. 2006 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 15
  16. 16. Key determinants (2)  Built environment (Blake & Lloyd, 2008)  Policy change (Marshall, 2004) 29/05/201416Workplace Health Promotion
  17. 17. Future directions Studies that analyze the relationship between environment, community attributes and PA behavior (Marshall, 2004) Shift in focus from individual to strategic & organizational (ecological) perspectives 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 17
  18. 18. Recommendations to wHPBASIC KEYWORDS (Pronk & Kottke, 2009)  Human centered culture = influencing org. change (Blake & Lloyd, 2008)  Engagement / Involvement / Participation  Tailoring to workplace characteristics  Strategic planning & communication  Accountability, measurement  Integration of strategies: Mass + Tailoring (Marshall, 2004) 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 18
  19. 19. Principles for increasing participation 1. Set the right participation goals for the right people (employees, champions & supporters vs. detractors) 2. Assess needs regularly (HRA) 3. Create & nurture a culture of health 4. Position the programme 5. Target comm. 6. Offer a menu of options => Nudge (Thaler & Sunstein, 2009) 7. Incentives 8. Measure participation (Serxner, Anderson & Gold, 2004) 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 19
  20. 20. groupwork
  21. 21. Group activity intro  Divide the class in 4-5 groups (3-5 people/group)  Assign the cases to the groups  Assign tasks 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 21
  22. 22. Groupwork activity (1) CASE 1 -Your represent the Health Coordinators of a mid-sized shoe-factory in Ticino, Switzerland and you are in charge of creating an health workplace programme for your employees and colleagues. CASE 2 - Your are members of the HComm Alliance for Healthy Workplaces and you've been asked to develop a draft project for a health enhancing programme for all the Credit Suisse banks in Lugano. 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 22
  23. 23. Groupwork activity (2) CASE 3 - Your are a group of health communication consultants and your are hired to develop a health promotion intervention for USI employees (faculty and academic support staff). CASE 4 - As independent health specialists, the Lombardia Region (regional government based in Milan) has hired you to develop an intervention for its employees. Remember that the Lombardia Region has an office, involved in health communication programmes (mainly information campaigns). CASE 5 – Each of you work independently as wellness coordinator for different clients. You are asked to develop a workplace health promotion in a rural area, where a network of 5 small-to-medium high-tech enterprises (SMEs) operate. 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 23
  24. 24. Group activity task  Think about the frame you want to give to the intervention and the behavioral focus (PA, smoking cessation, nutrition/diet, a combination, etc.).  According to the topics we covered today, think about possible partners or stakeholders to involve (you can chose one of the frameworks we covered in the previous lessons: RE-AIM, PRECEDE- PROCEED, people & places, etc.)  Focus on the recruitment strategy. 29/05/2014Workplace Health Promotion 24
  25. 25. Thankyou! ;)
  26. 26. Picture credits Google Headquarters Zurich  http://adrozdov.com/en/business/f ull/googleofficezurich.html  http://gconnect.in/gc/technology/g oogle-work-place-do-you-want-to- be-there.html 29/05/201427Workplace Health Promotion
  27. 27. References (1) Abraham, C., & Graham-Rowe, E. (2009). Are worksite interventions effective in increasing physical activity? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Health Psychology Review, 3(1), 108. Aittasalo, M., Miilunpalo, S., & Suni, J. (2004). The effectiveness of physical activity counseling in a work-site setting: A randomized, controlled trial. Patient Education and Counseling, 55(2), 193-202. Anderson, L. M., Quinn, T. A., Glanz, K., Ramirez, G., Kahwati, L. C., Johnson, D. B., et al. (2009). The effectiveness of worksite nutrition and physical activity interventions for controlling employee overweight and obesity A systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37(4), 340-357. Batt, M. E. (2009). Physical activity interventions in the workplace: The rationale and future direction for workplace wellness. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 43(1), 47-48. Black, C. (2008). Working for a healthier tomorro. dame carol black's review of the health of britain's working age population. London, UK: Department of Work and Pensions, The Stationery Office (TSO). Blake, H., & Lloyd, S. (2008). Influencing organisational change in the NHS: Lessons learned from workplace wellness initiatives in practice. Quality in Primary Care, 16(6), 449-455. 29/05/201428Workplace Health Promotion
  28. 28. References (1) 29/05/201429Workplace Health Promotion
  29. 29. References (1) CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2007). Healthier worksite initiative - HWI | DNPAO | CDC. Retrieved 12/2/2009, 2009, from http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/hwi/index.htm Chinn, D. J., White, M., Howel, D., Harland, J. O. E., & Drinkwater, C. K. (2006). Factors associated with non-participation in a physical activity promotion trial. Public Health, 120(4), 309-319. Marshall, A. L. (2004). Challenges and opportunities for promoting physical activity in the workplace. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 7(1, Supplement 1), 60. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Worksite health promotion programs : Wellness at work program : NYC DOHMH. Retrieved 12/2/2009, 2009, from http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/wellness/wellness-hlthpromo.shtml Plotnikoff, R. C., McCargar, L. J., Wilson, P. M., & Loucaides, C. A. (2005). Efficacy of an E-mail intervention for the promotion of physical activity and nutrition behavior in the workplace context. American Journal of Health Promotion, 19(6), 422-429. PriceWaterhouseCoopers. (2008). Building the case for wellness. London, UK: PriceWaterhouseCoopers London. Prinz, R. J., Smith, E. P., Dumas, J. E., Laughlin, J. E., White, D. W., & Barron, R. (2001). Recruitment and retention of participants in prevention trials involving family-based interventions. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 20(1, Supplement 1), 31. 29/05/201430Workplace Health Promotion

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