Modal Verbs 2010

14,354 views

Published on

Brief revision of Modals (common features mainly) and a deeper look at Modal Perfects Form and Use.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
14,354
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3,390
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
495
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Modal Verbs 2010

  1. 1. MODAL VERBS
  2. 2. CAN COULD MAY MIGHT WILL WOULD SHALL SHOULD MUST
  3. 3. Common Features:
  4. 4. 1. They don’t add “s” for the 3rd Person Singular. 2. They have no –ing or –ed Forms. 3. They are followed by a 0 infinitive (except “Ought TO”). 4. They add “not” for the negative. 5. In questions, the word order changes to modal + subject +
  5. 5. Similar Structures
  6. 6. BE ABLE TO HAVE TO HAD BETTER USED TO NEED TO/ NEEDN’T
  7. 7. Modal Verbs express ideas such as Possibility, Intention, Obligation, Advice and Necessity (More on the use of Modals and similar structures in your Textbook)
  8. 8. MODAL PERFECTS
  9. 9. FORM: Modal (+not) + HAVE + PAST PARTICIPLE Interrogative: Modal + Subject + Have + Past Participle (Remember: Always “Have”, Never “Has”) USES: Certainty, Guess, Regret, Possibility, Ability, … IN THE PAST
  10. 10. Common Modal Perfects: - Must have + past participle: Deduction about the past we are certain about: He must have left. I don’t see him anywhere. (I am sure that he left)
  11. 11. - May / Might have + past participle: Possibility that something happened in the past, doubt that something happened: I may have left my keys at home this morning. (Perhaps I left them, I’m not sure) Versus - Could have + past participle: Missed opportunity to have done something that we didn’t: She could have passed last year. (She had the chance to pass but she didn’t)
  12. 12. - Should (ought to) / shouldn’t (oughtn’t to) have + past participle: Regret about something that happened (or didn’t ) in the past: I ought to have studied harder this term (I’m sorry I didn’t, I wish I had) You shouldn’t have given him the bad news (I wish you hadn’t told him, I’m sorry you told him)
  13. 13. - Needn’t have + past participle: To refer to an unnecessary action that someone has done: I needn’t have brought an umbrella. It’s sunny today. (It wasn’t necessary for me to have brought an umbrella) - Would(n’t) have + past participle: Used mainly for 3rd Type Conditionals: I would have gone out if I’d had time
  14. 14. You can watch this Presentation online and have more practice at: http://englishteachermargarita.blogspot.com/

×