Micro Housing: Who Needs It?

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ADD Architecture and Design, Inc.

Published in: Real Estate

Micro Housing: Who Needs It?

  1. 1. ANDREW Age: 25 Architecture KAREN Age: 27 Interiors JUSTIN Age: 29 Graphics MicroHousing: Who needs it???
  2. 2. Luxury Housing Student Residence Halls Affordable Housing Living Gap Market Rate Affordability ?
  3. 3. What we are seeing… • Increased housing demand • Production not keeping pace What we need… Affordability for emerging workforce, small families, single income households, divorcees and retirees.
  4. 4. today’s focus • who needs it? • what is micro-housing? • how planning can help
  5. 5. Amsterdam experience
  6. 6. Micro-Housing: Who Needs It?
  7. 7. 2013 Housing Report Card Database Special thanks to Barry B and his team at the Dukakis Center for Urban and Public Policy
  8. 8. 100% 50% 0% Housing Child Care Food College Health Care 2005 – 2011 cost of living going up Percent change from 2005 - 2011 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 * SNEAPA data, percent change from 2000 - 2011 + 14% $ + 16% $ + 28% $ $ + 168% $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ + 66%* $ $
  9. 9. $1500 $ 1000 $ 500 1990 2000 2010 1990 – 2010 Nominal rents going up 1990 – 2010 Data from Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 Up 80% $642 /month $786 /month $1160 /month
  10. 10. 2009 – 2013 Home prices going up Single Famil y Home +4 % +4% Condominium Annual Median Prices for Greater Boston Metropolitan Area p.41 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 + 46% Double & Triple Deckers 50% 25% 0%
  11. 11. +15% 0% -15% 2000 – 2011 Incomes stagnating/declining Home Owner Income + .9% -13.1% Renter Income 2000 – 2011 Median Income Greater Boston Metropolitan Area p.20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013
  12. 12. Housing Cost Burden Over 25% are paying more than 50% of their income on rent 1990 – 2010 p.20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013
  13. 13. Greater Boston Demographics: 1 in 3 are between 20 and 34 years old 1990 – 2010 p.20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 20-34 yrs 33%
  14. 14. Over 40% are over 45 years old 45-64 yrs 27% +27% in 10 years 65+ yrs 13% 2011 Data p. 20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 We need buildings with elevators...
  15. 15. Nearly 40 % are single person households 2011 p.20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 Do I want roommates? Not really...
  16. 16. More small households, fewer children 16.9% Single living with others 37% Live alone 25.3% Families with no children under 18 23.2% Families with children under 18 2011 Data p. 20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 Over 75% don’t live with children
  17. 17. Greater Boston housing supply Postwar neighborhoods built for much larger families
  18. 18. City of Boston 272,000 units * 2007-2011 American Community Survey, Greater Boston 5 county data 1 Bed 25.8% 2 Bed 34.2% 3 Bed 22.5% 4+ Bed 10.8% Studio 6.7% More than 2/3 are larger units Figure 10: Share of Housing Units by Number of Bedrooms 2008-2012 Source: American FactFinder – 2008–2012 American Community Survey
  19. 19. Greater Boston – 1.4 million units 3 Bed 33.6% 4+ Bed 22.9% Studios are only 2.1%! * 2007-2011 American Community Survey, Greater Boston 5 county data More than 80% are 2 Beds or above
  20. 20. City of Newton – 32,344 units 3 Bed+ 65% 2Bed 23% Studios are only 1%! * 2008 -2012 American Community Survey, Newton data More than 87% are 2 beds or above 1 Bed 11%
  21. 21. Newton 2030 : Change by age Seniors increase every decade * MAPC Projection Data
  22. 22. Newton 2030 : Change by household size * MAPC Projection Data
  23. 23. seniors widows We need smaller units for moderate income groups! divorcees inno workforce service workers creatives grads undergrads Resulting in a pressing shortage
  24. 24. Effects of small unit shortage Students & emerging professionals 2x rent I’d like to live alone * 50% undergrads and 80% graduate students live in market-rate housing, data from Dukakis Family Priced out
  25. 25. Widows and seniors I want to downsize Can’t move Family Effects of small unit shortage
  26. 26. Price wars 2x rent Baby boomers Lots of college debt Leaving suburbs for city Millennials & couples priced out
  27. 27. Increase the inventory of small units within the City of Boston * 2007-2011 American Community Survey, Greater Boston 5 county data 1 Bed 25.8% 2 Bed 34.2% 3 Bed 22.5% 4+ Bed 10.8% Studio 6.7% Adding 30,000 studios is only 10%
  28. 28. What is micro- housing?
  29. 29. Below the minimum 500 s.f. 750 s.f. 900 s.f. BOSTON UNIT SIZE Studio 1-BR 2-BR ‘METRO UNIT’ 450 s.f. 625 s.f. 850 s.f. Rent at $4 per sf per month $ 2000 $ 3000 $ 3600 Micro 300 s.f. $ 1200 $2000/mo is 60% of a person’s income making $50,000/ year
  30. 30. ADD Inc research initiative Proprietary Research Studies
  31. 31. How small would you go to live in Boston? 250 SF? 450 SF? Design and price matter more than quantity of space Proprietary Research Studies
  32. 32. What would you share? WE DON’T COOK THAT MUCH Proprietary Research Studies
  33. 33. How about multi-functional furniture? Proprietary Research Studies
  34. 34. What kind of common space? • Small lobby/ party space • Laundry • Outdoor space with bbq grills We don’t need much! Proprietary Research Studies
  35. 35. Prototype 300 s.f Unit Ma. Building Code (2009 IBC) mandates 220 s.f. occupiable floor area
  36. 36. WHATS IN 2012 FULL SCALE MOCK-UP MOMU
  37. 37. 172 units in 3 projects KAREN Units at 425 sf 450 sf 350 sf Innovation District
  38. 38. 380 s.f. studio service workers Divorcee/ widowers Innovation workforce Studios address priority populations 275 Albany Street, South End, Boston
  39. 39. 399 Congress - Micro Studio with sleeping niche 330 sf
  40. 40. 1350 Boylston Street Units 440 sf Studio
  41. 41. Compact 1 bedrooms 550 s.f. seniors couples divorcees
  42. 42. Harvard Square Micros 500 sf 1 BR K LR BR BATH w s
  43. 43. 500 sf 1 BR
  44. 44. 1+ bedrooms too! Today’s families 680 s.f.
  45. 45. 710 sf 1 BD + Den 1350 Boylston Street Units
  46. 46. How planning can help
  47. 47. Multi-family master plan zones near transit 1.  Density incentives for smaller units 2.  Expedited permitting for more low & middle income units (deed-restricted) 3.  Reduced parking ratios 4.  Reduced infrastructure improvements (open space, traffic mitigation, stormwater, etc.)
  48. 48. Educate your town Data is compelling So is design!
  49. 49. Your ideas?

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