Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Sharq Elneil CollegeSchool of Medical Laboratory Sciences    Department of Microbiology   Medical Bacteriology course     ...
The Natural habitatNormal components of the flora of: Intestinal tract Oral cavity Vaginal canal of humans and animals
Morphology Gram-positive cocci (0.5 and1.25 micrometers in diameter)usually occur in pairs or shortchainsNon-capsulate...
General properties:production of gas from glucose(most enterococci are negative)Have ability to grow at both45°C and 10°...
Medically Important speciesAt least 12 different species havebeen associated with various illnessesEnterococcus faecalis...
Culture &chaacteristics:Enterococci are aerobic organismscapable of growing over a widetemperature range,10–45 ºCOn bloo...
ON MacConkey &CLEDFerments lactose, producing small dark-red magenta colonies on MacConkey agasmall yellow colonies on CLE...
Enterococcus species are alsoable to grow in the presence of 6.5%sodium chloride and 40% bile. When grown on media conta...
Virulence Factor Polysaccharides on the surface ofenterococci represent an effective way toprevent phagocytosis. Secrete...
Pathogeicity:Enterococcus faecalis, causing about 95% ofenterococcal infections including infectionsof theUrinary tract i...
Laboratory diagnosisspecimens:Collection of SpacimenDirect ExamCultureIdentificaionSerologyMolecular characterization
Biochemical TestsCatalase negativeFerment lactose (alsomannitol and other sugars).Hydrolyze aesculinReduce litmus milk
grow on reduce sorbitol   glycerol, D-       L-       melibios           0.4%      tetrazol                  tagatose arab...
Lancefield GroupingEnterococci possess LancefieldGroup D antigen (as also somestreptococci).The Group D antigen of enter...
Antibiotic ResistantMost enterococci are susceptible toampicillin and resistant tocephalosporins.Resistance is shown aga...
Penicillin or AmpicillinVancomycinFor urine isolatesFluoroquinolonesNitrofurantoinFosfomycinVancomycin-resistant str...
THANK YOU FOR ATTENTION
Enterococci  ppt mahadi
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Enterococci ppt mahadi

7,164 views

Published on

Enterococci ppt mahadi

  1. 1. Sharq Elneil CollegeSchool of Medical Laboratory Sciences Department of Microbiology Medical Bacteriology course Enterococci Dr.Mahadi Hassan Mahmoud mahadi2010sd@yahoo.com Bsc, Msc, MIBMS Microbiology
  2. 2. The Natural habitatNormal components of the flora of: Intestinal tract Oral cavity Vaginal canal of humans and animals
  3. 3. Morphology Gram-positive cocci (0.5 and1.25 micrometers in diameter)usually occur in pairs or shortchainsNon-capsulateNon-motile.
  4. 4. General properties:production of gas from glucose(most enterococci are negative)Have ability to grow at both45°C and 10°C temperatures).Can grow on media containingBile aesculin,
  5. 5. Medically Important speciesAt least 12 different species havebeen associated with various illnessesEnterococcus faecalis and E.faecium — have emerged as a majorcause of nosocomial infections
  6. 6. Culture &chaacteristics:Enterococci are aerobic organismscapable of growing over a widetemperature range,10–45 ºCOn blood agar,Enterococci are mainly nonhaemolyticbut some strains show alpha or beta-haemolysis
  7. 7. ON MacConkey &CLEDFerments lactose, producing small dark-red magenta colonies on MacConkey agasmall yellow colonies on CLED (cysteinelactose electrolyte-deficient) agar
  8. 8. Enterococcus species are alsoable to grow in the presence of 6.5%sodium chloride and 40% bile. When grown on media containingaesculin, enterococci hydrolyze theaesculin, producing black colonies.
  9. 9. Virulence Factor Polysaccharides on the surface ofenterococci represent an effective way toprevent phagocytosis. Secreted factors (cytolysin/hemolysin,gelatinase and serine protease) cell surface-located proteins oradhesins (Esp) and the adhesin ofcollagen Adhesins (Acm and SagA)
  10. 10. Pathogeicity:Enterococcus faecalis, causing about 95% ofenterococcal infections including infectionsof theUrinary tract infection Biliary tract,ulcers (e.g. bed sores) Wounds (particularly abdominal) Occasionally endocarditis or meningitis
  11. 11. Laboratory diagnosisspecimens:Collection of SpacimenDirect ExamCultureIdentificaionSerologyMolecular characterization
  12. 12. Biochemical TestsCatalase negativeFerment lactose (alsomannitol and other sugars).Hydrolyze aesculinReduce litmus milk
  13. 13. grow on reduce sorbitol glycerol, D- L- melibios 0.4% tetrazol tagatose arabinos e telluride ium to e formaz anE. yes Yes Acid Acid Acid No Acid No AcidfaecalisE. No No No Acid No Acid No Acid Acid Acidfaecium
  14. 14. Lancefield GroupingEnterococci possess LancefieldGroup D antigen (as also somestreptococci).The Group D antigen of enterococciis unlike that of other Lancefieldgroups.It is not extracted by traditional acidextraction techniques. Enzymetechniquesbased on Maxted’s enzymeare required.
  15. 15. Antibiotic ResistantMost enterococci are susceptible toampicillin and resistant tocephalosporins.Resistance is shown againstpenicillin. Vancomycinand ampicillinresistance appear to beemerging,associated particularly withhospital infections.
  16. 16. Penicillin or AmpicillinVancomycinFor urine isolatesFluoroquinolonesNitrofurantoinFosfomycinVancomycin-resistant strains(VRE)
  17. 17. THANK YOU FOR ATTENTION

×