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Pester Power
Marketing Management
Prepared By
Kindly restrict the use of slides for personal purpose.
Please seek permission to reproduce the same in public...
Pester Power
• “Pester Power” or “The
Nag Factor” as the
phenomenon is known as
in US literature is the
“tendency of child...
Pester Power
• Due to children's buying
influence growing in line
with average household
income, some
commentators now ref...
Pester Power
• Pester Power is
commonly used by
marketing companies to
target the 4–6 years old
category as they have
limi...
Pester Power
• The growth of the issue of
Pester Power is directly
related to the rise of child
advertising. Mr Potato
Hea...
Pester Power
• It is now a convention for
children’s products to be
directly marketed at children.
Through Pester Power,
c...
Pester power' costs parents £460 a year
• One in six parents claim they now find it difficult
to say "no" to their child w...
Reducing pester power
• Lay down some ground rules.
Before you take your child to a
shopping centre or other
pestering hot...
Reducing pester power
• Offer healthy incentives for good
shopping behaviour. For example,
‘If you can get through this
sh...
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy
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“Pester Power” or “The Nag Factor” as the phenomenon is known as in US literature is the “tendency of children, who are bombarded with marketers' messages, to unrelentingly request advertised items”. The phrase is used to describe the negative connotations of children's influence in their parents buying habits.

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Pester power - Marketing Management - Manu Melwin Joy

  1. 1. Pester Power Marketing Management
  2. 2. Prepared By Kindly restrict the use of slides for personal purpose. Please seek permission to reproduce the same in public forms and presentations. Manu Melwin Joy Assistant Professor Ilahia School of Management Studies Kerala, India. Phone – 9744551114 Mail – manu_melwinjoy@yahoo.com
  3. 3. Pester Power • “Pester Power” or “The Nag Factor” as the phenomenon is known as in US literature is the “tendency of children, who are bombarded with marketers' messages, to unrelentingly request advertised items”. The phrase is used to describe the negative connotations of children's influence in their parents buying habits.
  4. 4. Pester Power • Due to children's buying influence growing in line with average household income, some commentators now refer to the home as being a Filiarchy due to the power that children may hold in the household's consumer choices. This makes pester power relevant for the modern household.
  5. 5. Pester Power • Pester Power is commonly used by marketing companies to target the 4–6 years old category as they have limited disposable income of their own, and consequently do not have the means to buy goods themselves.
  6. 6. Pester Power • The growth of the issue of Pester Power is directly related to the rise of child advertising. Mr Potato Head was the first children’s toy to be advertised on television, this aired in 1952, and paved the way for Pester Power as pitching to children was seen to be an innovative new idea.
  7. 7. Pester Power • It is now a convention for children’s products to be directly marketed at children. Through Pester Power, children have assumed role of being the 'ultimate weapon' in influencing family spending because of the how they consistently nag their parents. As a result, children have been likened to being a "Trojan Horse" within the modern household for marketing companies
  8. 8. Pester power' costs parents £460 a year • One in six parents claim they now find it difficult to say "no" to their child when pestered to buy them something. • Nine out of 10 parents said their children demand things when out shopping together. • Just under one in 20 had not been mithered while the rest choose to leave the offspring at home to avoid the whining. • Of those that give in, four in five parents bought snacks even though they tried to be strict.
  9. 9. Reducing pester power • Lay down some ground rules. Before you take your child to a shopping centre or other pestering hotspot, talk about what behavior you expect and how you’ll respond to any pestering. • Praise your child for good shopping behavior. If she gets around the supermarket without pestering, give her lots of positive attention to make sure she knows you’ve noticed. For example, ‘I’m really proud of how you helped me shop and didn’t ask for things we can’t get’.
  10. 10. Reducing pester power • Offer healthy incentives for good shopping behaviour. For example, ‘If you can get through this shopping trip without asking for stuff, we’ll stop at the park on the way home’. • Try to keep advertising to a minimum in your home – for example, through the TV, radio, internet, newspapers and junk mail. Advertising is designed to make children want things. If they’re not exposed to it, they’re less likely to see products and think they want them.
  • TheenaRagavan

    Aug. 4, 2020

“Pester Power” or “The Nag Factor” as the phenomenon is known as in US literature is the “tendency of children, who are bombarded with marketers' messages, to unrelentingly request advertised items”. The phrase is used to describe the negative connotations of children's influence in their parents buying habits.

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