Cultural Spaces for New Audiences Amy Kaufman, Lord Cultural Resources
Table of Contents <ul><li>Changing Demographics and Behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional Change  </li></ul><ul><li>Des...
It’s a New World <ul><li>Technology was only the beginning… </li></ul><ul><li>New audiences, behaving in new ways </li></u...
<ul><li>Changing Demographics </li></ul>
The Changing Face of America - 2034  <ul><li>Aging Baby Boomers </li></ul>Acceleration of Minority Populations More Workin...
No Average American Aging Diversity Internet Multicultural  Multigenerational Special Interest Groups
An Emerging Core Audience: Young Cosmopolitans <ul><li>YoCos, young cosmopolitans, are turning modern and contemporary art...
Core Audiences are Evolving  Y o-Cos B aby  Boomers N ew Families THE ‘ C REATIVE  C LASS’ C ultural Tourists
<ul><li>Changing Behavior </li></ul>
Activity Clustering Activities Must Deliver More Than Ever Before: Allow people to “Make a Day of It” (Clustering) Be wort...
Attendance Rising at Active Museums Types  Visitors are seeking out active, participatory, family  friendly experiences. *...
Audiences Trending toward Locals <ul><li>Tourism is down, but local attendance is projected to increase. </li></ul><ul><li...
New Modes of Communication <ul><li>Visitors are regularly using new technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>Walker Center “Art on ...
<ul><li>Institutional Change </li></ul><ul><li>“ The museum is like a living, cultural being. It’s an active space, a thin...
From Aggregating to Civil Society Institutions  Emphasis on Collections Emphasis on Programming Photo: Craig Stevens 19 Ja...
Social Engagement as the Primary Driver <ul><li>Museums are promoting the social context as integral to the experience. </...
Art Production as Part of the Experience <ul><li>Museums are increasingly taking on the role of studio and lab to integrat...
Focusing on the Community <ul><li>Community centric initiatives are being rewarded through increased visitation and greate...
Partnerships & Alliances  <ul><li>Museums are leveraging partnerships and alliances in new ways to. </li></ul><ul><li>The ...
Interdisciplinary Endeavors <ul><li>Cultural institutions are blurring boundaries and emerging as catalysts of interdiscip...
Visitor Curated Content <ul><li>Museums are forging deeper relationships with visitors by allowing them to drive narrative...
<ul><li>Implications for Design </li></ul>
Beyond Galleries and Lobbies <ul><li>Active experiences  </li></ul><ul><li>Welcoming for both savvy and first time visitor...
Campuses and Mixed-Use Environments <ul><li>Institutions continue to link in cultural clusters to attract a critical mass ...
Transparency and Permeability <ul><li>There is a deliberate movement away from imposing “institutional” buildings to creat...
Back of House Moves to the Front  <ul><li>Institutions are leveraging all their activities to provide a more robust visito...
Larger, Flexible Volumes <ul><li>Institutions are preparing to deliver new and unexpected forms of exhibitions and perform...
Social Spaces <ul><li>Social spaces are no longer an afterthought. </li></ul><ul><li>Orange Lounge, Orange County Museum o...
Visible Storage <ul><li>Collections are being made accessible and helping visitors to understand the challenges and possib...
Education Centers and “Hot-Spots” <ul><li>As museums serve increasingly diverse audiences formal and informal learning spa...
Project Spaces and Artists in Residence <ul><li>Project spaces and artist studios are now planned rather than adapted by c...
Retooling Existing Spaces Museums are reconsidering plans to expand and opting to reconfigure existing space. San Jose Art...
Grouping,  Regrouping and Getting Comfortable <ul><li>Cultural spaces are not known for comfort. Visitors rarely arrive at...
Universal Design and Access <ul><li>As active Boomers age and intergenerational visitation increases, universal access wil...
Design Implications Changes in Demographics Changes in Behavior Changes in Institutions
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  • Aging Baby Boomers - 50% jump in the post-retirement population -Today, 1 in 8 Americans are older than 65; -In 2034, this ration will jump to 1 in 5 Acceleration of Minority Populations -Accelerating rapidly – In mid 1980s was 1 in 5 Americans, now 1 in 3 -The growth rate of the Caucasian population is projected at virtually zero growth -By 2034, US Congress and other elected bodies will be more representative of this minority increase More Working Mothers -Today, ratio of women in college vs men is 60:40 -Women will outnumber men in professional and doctoral degrees Will work hard to meet the rising expectations of highly educated moms Will provide women with a convenient, welcoming place to spend the scarce time they have with their family
  • 8% (17,000,000) of the Total US Population • Dual Audience (50% men / 50% women) • 55% Generation X and Y • 35% Boomers • 10% Age 65+ • 35% have a post graduate degree (vs. 8% of the total general population) • 61% Professional / Managerial (vs. 23% of the general population) • Median HHI $98,000 (vs. $52,000 for the general population) LEAD DIGITAL LIFESTYLES Millenials are next – always had internet – more socially responsible, experiential
  • Baby boomers seeking enriching experiences “ New” families (multigenerational, multicultural) spending quality time together and seeking stimulating experiences to share with children YoCo’s seeking social experiences Cultural tourists – as we know them now, new from emerging markets, and special interest Huge working creative class seeking informal professional development Must meet increasing demands for services for the aging Must partner with senior organizations Museums will become places of cultural exchange in their communities As families have less time to spend together, museums will have to provide welcoming places where their rising expectations are met
  • -Limited Leisure Time has an anomalous effect – People are addicted to activity
  • On average, Americans devote only 9 hours a year to arts and cultural activities. The Centre Pompidou offers a multifaceted experience including an active plaza, unique entry sequence, learning labs, dining (with views) and shopping.
  • Part of Piano redo – in meyer buildinbg
  • The High Museum of Art and the Louvre recently created a multiyear collaboration to bring works by Raphael, Rubens, Rembrandt, Vel á zquez and Watteau to the High&apos;s new expansion. The two museums will cultivate a broader relationship for exchanges of students, curators, educators, marketers and fund-raisers. The High is paying the Louvre an ‘ amount exceeding $10 million ’ but expects to save millions on organizational costs for future exhibitions which have cost between $2.5 and $4 million each. ·         The high profile 1999 merger between MoMA and P.S.1 allowed MoMA to engage more directly with contemporary art and the art community in New York, while giving P.S. 1 institutional security. This merger allowed each of these partners to keep their own identity yet benefit collectively. The Cincinnati Museum of Natural History and the Cincinnati Historical Society became the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal in 1994. A second successful merger followed in 1997 when the Cincinnati Children ’ s Museum came on board.
  • Explorations - not shuffling along a planned path Able to accommodate groups
  • Indianapolis Children’s Museum – dome theater no longer relevant – exhibit “dinosphere” with paleontologists working in lab in play environment – partner with university
  • Ann Arbor – teaching and visible – focusssed exhibitions for course work Conservation labs and storage – helps people understand the work of what you’re doing (eg comparing and contrasting 100 kinds of toads) even if it is not “exhibit worthy”
  • formal and informal, Not just for schools – not confined to the basement … Two forms – nooks and centers – experiences that both kids and adults can latch into – space/experiences for all to enjoy DAM – nooks in galleries that promote informal learning to engage people – make your own film, Hotspots Artists are transforming the Hamilton Building for the Embrace! exhibition, which opens November 14. To witness not-to-be-missed moments during the installation, sign up for Art Mail , become a fan on Facebook , or follow the DAM on Twitter .   More for Adults   Read about the art on view through labels, books, quotes from artists, and more. Listen to different perspectives on world cultures — from Africa to the Old West — at our iPod listening stations. Respond to the art on view in our journals and other writing activities. And indulge your muse in our artmaking areas. Make an Egyptian flower collar, leave a promise with an African sculpture, create your own building — who knows what you&apos;ll find this Saturday? Look for this sign, or ask for locations at a welcome center. Cal academy - touch pools
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  • Cultural space ak

    1. 1. Cultural Spaces for New Audiences Amy Kaufman, Lord Cultural Resources
    2. 2. Table of Contents <ul><li>Changing Demographics and Behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional Change </li></ul><ul><li>Design Implications </li></ul>Interior, British Museum , London Photo: fourmthree 10 Apr 2006/http://www.flickr.com/photos/51462625@N00/126331906/http://www.flickr.com/photos/51462625@N00/126331906/ The Louvre , Paris Photo: Gregory Bastien 21 June 2008/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/gregory_bastien/2598585324/
    3. 3. It’s a New World <ul><li>Technology was only the beginning… </li></ul><ul><li>New audiences, behaving in new ways </li></ul><ul><li>Funders are demanding real impact on &quot;real people&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Budgets have been cut 10%-30% </li></ul><ul><li>Expansions and new buildings on hold </li></ul><ul><li>Museums are responding: </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on social engagement through relevant and interdisciplinary programming </li></ul><ul><li>New models for collection building and storage </li></ul><ul><li>New approaches to space </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Changing Demographics </li></ul>
    5. 5. The Changing Face of America - 2034 <ul><li>Aging Baby Boomers </li></ul>Acceleration of Minority Populations More Working Mothers 20% of the population will be 65+ 46% of the population will be minorities Women get married and have kids later in life http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/view?q=old%20active%20couple&psc=G&filter=1#5264346987601400226 Photo: Walt Jabsco/Picassa Photo: Karen Banez/Picassa
    6. 6. No Average American Aging Diversity Internet Multicultural Multigenerational Special Interest Groups
    7. 7. An Emerging Core Audience: Young Cosmopolitans <ul><li>YoCos, young cosmopolitans, are turning modern and contemporary art institutions into hubs of social activity. </li></ul><ul><li>65% of all YoCos participated in cultural activities last year (vs. 35% of the general population) </li></ul><ul><li>36% visited museums (6.1 million) </li></ul><ul><li>YoCos are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Event driven </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fundamentally social </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guided by word of mouth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Living in apartments – social activity is focused outside the home </li></ul>Photo: Larry Williams/Picassa
    8. 8. Core Audiences are Evolving Y o-Cos B aby Boomers N ew Families THE ‘ C REATIVE C LASS’ C ultural Tourists
    9. 9. <ul><li>Changing Behavior </li></ul>
    10. 10. Activity Clustering Activities Must Deliver More Than Ever Before: Allow people to “Make a Day of It” (Clustering) Be worth their Time Offer “Bang for your Buck” Photo: Royalty-Free/Corbin/Picassa
    11. 11. Attendance Rising at Active Museums Types Visitors are seeking out active, participatory, family friendly experiences. *In 2009, AAM consolidated Zoos/Aquariums, Arboretum/Botanic Gardens and Nature Centers into one category called “Living Collections”
    12. 12. Audiences Trending toward Locals <ul><li>Tourism is down, but local attendance is projected to increase. </li></ul><ul><li>28% of respondents to a recent national study expect to increase attendance at museums in the next 6 months (66% expect to remain the same) 1 </li></ul><ul><li>7 out of 10 looking for: convenient schedule, discounted programs, free events and exhibitions </li></ul><ul><li>Attracting repeat visits will become more important than ever before </li></ul><ul><li>35% of surveyed museums in the UK have seen an increase in visitors, with many reporting record figures 2 </li></ul><ul><li>1 LaPlaca Cohen/AMS forthcoming study </li></ul><ul><li>2 The Art Fund, “Culture Crunch? The Art Fund Museum Survey – Sept 2008 – March 2009 </li></ul>
    13. 13. New Modes of Communication <ul><li>Visitors are regularly using new technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>Walker Center “Art on Call” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cell phone tour </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web with 2.0 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MP3 podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The visitor experience now starts at home – or on a PDA </li></ul><ul><li>Almost half of ticketing projected to be done online </li></ul>Photo: Fire Monkey Fish 29 Oct 2004/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/mmewuji/1136537/
    14. 14. <ul><li>Institutional Change </li></ul><ul><li>“ The museum is like a living, cultural being. It’s an active space, a thinking space.” </li></ul><ul><li>Pieranna Cavalchini, Curator of Contemporary Art, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum </li></ul>
    15. 15. From Aggregating to Civil Society Institutions Emphasis on Collections Emphasis on Programming Photo: Craig Stevens 19 Jan 2009 http://www.flickr.com/photos/beantown/3209643011/ Photo: Walters Art Museum 7 July 2009/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/walters-art-museum/3697505361/
    16. 16. Social Engagement as the Primary Driver <ul><li>Museums are promoting the social context as integral to the experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Centre Pompidou - a complete multifaceted experience </li></ul><ul><li>Orange County Museum of Art - Orange Lounge, a multimedia space that targets youth </li></ul><ul><li>Museums in general - prime sources for building </li></ul><ul><li>“ social capital” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Harvard Business School Alumni – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Contemporaries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Art Circle – 10 New York arts groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Young Professionals of Milwaukee – Art Mob </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Art Production as Part of the Experience <ul><li>Museums are increasingly taking on the role of studio and lab to integrate production into the visitor experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Museum of Art and Design, New York </li></ul><ul><li>Greene Family Learning Gallery, High Museum, Atlanta </li></ul>Photo: http://www.madmuseum.org/DO/ Open%20Studios.aspx Photo: bittermelon 2 July 2008/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/bittermelon/2632812256/in/photostream/
    18. 18. Focusing on the Community <ul><li>Community centric initiatives are being rewarded through increased visitation and greater impact. </li></ul><ul><li>Brooklyn Museum has reached out to its immediate community by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Welcoming everyone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Producing social and family programming – Target First Saturdays </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Taking in travelling blockbusters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reimagining permanent collection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating a point of differentiation: The Sackler Center for Feminist Art </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NOMA saw record attendance at the Rodrigue “Blue Dog” exhibition which dealt with Hurricane Katrina and incorporated social events. </li></ul>
    19. 19. Partnerships & Alliances <ul><li>Museums are leveraging partnerships and alliances in new ways to. </li></ul><ul><li>The Mori in Tokyo admits visitors to the mixed use development for free </li></ul><ul><li>Munch and Stenersen are co-locating to tell a bigger story </li></ul><ul><li>Space carved out in Federal Hall for partnership with NYC & Co. </li></ul>Mori Tower, Tokyo Photo: s.yume/ 11 Sept 2009/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/syume/3911042876/in/photostream
    20. 20. Interdisciplinary Endeavors <ul><li>Cultural institutions are blurring boundaries and emerging as catalysts of interdisciplinary investigation. </li></ul><ul><li>The Lab at Belmar –Mixed Tastes: Tag Team Lectures on Unrelated Topics (Marxism and Kittens, Silent Films and Counterfeit Currency, Tamales and Literary Memoirs, Walt Whitman and Whole Hog Cooking), Spoken word and musical performances </li></ul><ul><li>Le Laboratorie – Collaborations and innovation in Art Science </li></ul><ul><li>Works & Process at the Guggenheim </li></ul>
    21. 21. Visitor Curated Content <ul><li>Museums are forging deeper relationships with visitors by allowing them to drive narrative. </li></ul><ul><li>MoMA: “unauthorized” podcast has led to visitor clips posted on website </li></ul><ul><li>Musetrek – Web 2.0 application for PDAs currently in testing at the Louvre </li></ul><ul><li>My Collection – Acoustiguide and HP technology, allows collection items to be bookmarked and downloaded after tour </li></ul>Photo: http://www.musetrek.com/
    22. 22. <ul><li>Implications for Design </li></ul>
    23. 23. Beyond Galleries and Lobbies <ul><li>Active experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Welcoming for both savvy and first time visitors </li></ul><ul><li>Providing for both formal and informal education </li></ul><ul><li>Displaying collection in new ways </li></ul><ul><li>Maximum flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Comfortable for all ages </li></ul><ul><li>Setting the scene for social interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Lobbies – less ticketing, more service? </li></ul>
    24. 24. Campuses and Mixed-Use Environments <ul><li>Institutions continue to link in cultural clusters to attract a critical mass of local and tourists. </li></ul><ul><li>Dallas Cultural District </li></ul><ul><li>Galicia’s City of Culture </li></ul><ul><li>Abu Dhabi’s Saadiyat Island </li></ul>Wyly Center, Dallas Arts District Photo: Iwan Bann/ New York Times Saadiyat Island, Abu Dhabi Photo: Abu Dhabi Tourism Development and Investment Corporation
    25. 25. Transparency and Permeability <ul><li>There is a deliberate movement away from imposing “institutional” buildings to create places of meaning and community. </li></ul><ul><li>Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati </li></ul><ul><li>Brooklyn Museum, New York </li></ul><ul><li>Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University </li></ul>Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn Photo: Joe Architect/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/joearchitect/2673291934/
    26. 26. Back of House Moves to the Front <ul><li>Institutions are leveraging all their activities to provide a more robust visitor experience. </li></ul><ul><li>California Academy of Sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Chicago Botanic Garden </li></ul><ul><li>Lunder Center, Smithsonian Museum of American Art </li></ul>California Academy of Sciences
    27. 27. Larger, Flexible Volumes <ul><li>Institutions are preparing to deliver new and unexpected forms of exhibitions and performance. </li></ul><ul><li>Park Avenue Armory, New York </li></ul><ul><li>National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, DC </li></ul><ul><li>King Abdulaziz Center for Knowledge and Culture, Dharan, Saudi Arabia </li></ul>Ernesto Neto “Anthropodino”, Park Avenue Armory Photo: www.armoryonpark.org Kind Abdulaziz Center for Knowledge and Culture, Dharan, Saudi Arabia
    28. 28. Social Spaces <ul><li>Social spaces are no longer an afterthought. </li></ul><ul><li>Orange Lounge, Orange County Museum of Art </li></ul><ul><li>Y2K Lounge, Rubin Museum of Art, New York </li></ul><ul><li>SFMoMA, Sculpture Garden and Café </li></ul><ul><li>Children’s Museum of Manhattan </li></ul>Y2K Lounge, Rubin Museum of Art, New York Photo: Chang Lee/ The New York Times
    29. 29. Visible Storage <ul><li>Collections are being made accessible and helping visitors to understand the challenges and possibilities of curatorial work. </li></ul><ul><li>University of Michigan Art Museum, Ann Arbor </li></ul><ul><li>Brooklyn Museum, New York </li></ul><ul><li>Darwin Center, London </li></ul>New York Historical Society, New York
    30. 30. Education Centers and “Hot-Spots” <ul><li>As museums serve increasingly diverse audiences formal and informal learning spaces are becoming “must haves.” </li></ul><ul><li>Education Center at the New Museum, New York: Museum as Hub, Resource Center </li></ul><ul><li>ICA, Boston: Mediatheque </li></ul><ul><li>Denver Art Museum: hotspots </li></ul><ul><li>California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco: Naturalist Center and learning stations </li></ul>Mediateque Center Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston Photos: Franchphotos/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/frankphotos/2797696288 /
    31. 31. Project Spaces and Artists in Residence <ul><li>Project spaces and artist studios are now planned rather than adapted by curators in need of flexible space. </li></ul><ul><li>Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego </li></ul><ul><li>Park Avenue Armory, New York </li></ul><ul><li>August Wilson Center, Pennsylvania </li></ul>Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego Photo: Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego
    32. 32. Retooling Existing Spaces Museums are reconsidering plans to expand and opting to reconfigure existing space. San Jose Art Museum, California
    33. 33. Grouping, Regrouping and Getting Comfortable <ul><li>Cultural spaces are not known for comfort. Visitors rarely arrive at urban cultural institutions feeling composed. </li></ul><ul><li>Driving destinations are simpler and even allow people to be processed in their cars. </li></ul><ul><li>The new Brooklyn Museum entrance provides outdoor seating, space to breathe and group, public restrooms, coat check, and NO pressure to hurry through and buy a ticket. </li></ul>Interior Brooklyn Museum, New York Photo: Tommaync 11 May 2008/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/perke/368141117/
    34. 34. Universal Design and Access <ul><li>As active Boomers age and intergenerational visitation increases, universal access will become critical - and expected. </li></ul><ul><li>Following ADA guidelines may not be enough. Are there perfect examples of universally accessible cultural spaces? </li></ul><ul><li>Newseum </li></ul>Newseum, Washington D.C. Photo: Afagen 10 Dec 2007 http://www.flickr.com/photos/afagen/2101181909/
    35. 35. Design Implications Changes in Demographics Changes in Behavior Changes in Institutions

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