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Dating App Study

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This is the result of an extensive study on the users of dating apps like Tinder, OKCupid, Zoosk and others. We were studying how people use the apps, how they present themselves, and whether or not they feel successful. We conducted this study over the course of a month to gain design insights and directions.

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Dating App Study

  1. 1. Looking for Love(in all the wrong places) User Research Methods Final Project Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu
  2. 2. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 2 Introduction Problem Space The internet has changed many aspects of daily life, like how people communicate, work and shop. It has also changed the way people meet each other for romantic relationships. Dating sites like OKCupid, Zoosk, Match.com and eHarmony are very popular and offer users the chance to examine potential mates before committing to a meeting. Some of these sites boast complex algorithms that match users by their interests and values. Objectives and Scope of the Research We were looking at how people use these apps, what their goals are when choosing different apps, and what results they find. We also want to discover what makes certain people successful on a particular app, and what makes someone unsuccessful. We also wanted to learn: • Why do people use dating applications on mobile? What do they gain from it? • Who uses it successfully and who is unsuccessful at it? • Do they look for long-term relationships or are they looking for a hook-up? • Are people going to these sites because the sites are superficial? • How does the experience vary between genders and sexual orientations? • What are the different experiences across different platforms/applications? • Does a particular app suit their needs? How do they make their decisions?
  3. 3. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 3 Introduction Methods we planned Survey, Interviews, Digital Artifacts collection, Contextual Inquiry, Diary Study, Customer Experience mapping Methods we executed Survey, Contexual Inquiries, Interviews, Modified Diary Study, Digital Artifact Diagramming, Affinity Diagramming We revised our field-site plan during the course of the study. We ran into a few recruiting problems in the beginning leaving us with little or no time to do a traditional Diary study of app users. We adjusted by contacting users through the dating apps and conducting interviews with over 11 individuals. We then conducted 7 in person interviews and 5 contextual inquiries from the interviews. Our new method, called Digital Artifact Diagramming provided us with adequate analysis information that we realized that we didn’t need to do a Customer Experience Map. Full descriptions of our work can be found on subsequent pages.
  4. 4. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 4 Fieldwork Summary We wanted to look at how people use the dating applications, what their goals are, the reasons and the context behind their usage. We conducted secondary research by looking up news articles and papers that would give as an idea of dating applications available and what are their general opinions on the usage of such apps. We conducted the field work for a period of 2 weeks. Online surveys were posted on various portals to get a general idea of demographics, the frequently used apps, etc. We also printed out flyers with the link to the survey. It was also used as a way to recruit participants for the interviews and contextual inquiry. To get a first- hand experience, we as researchers used the dating applications in order to understand the nature of each application. We also recruited by word of mouth, friends of friends, and by posting ads on different portals such as IU Classifieds, Craigslist, and requesting the users of dating apps to participate. When people responded to the ads, they were given time slots to choose from to participate. Interviews were typically conducted with 2 researchers and a participant at a centralized location[1] with the exception of one interview (which took place at the participant’s house)[2]. The [1] A subject during their interview. [2] A subject being interviewed in his home.
  5. 5. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 5 Fieldwork Summary strategy for interviewing involved verbal consent from the participant, after which the interview was video recorded. The interviews were semi structured, with a set of questions, and based on the responses, more questions were asked to gather related data. With the respondents’ consent, some interviews were followed by contextual inquiries, where the participant walked us through how they interact with their dating applications[3]. Some respondents were compensated with a 5 dollar gift card. Typically each session lasted from 20 to 30 minutes. Interviews were also conducted in the text form, through the dating applications itself. On apps such as Tinder and OkCupid, we identified ourselves as researchers and explained the nature of the research. While we approached some users to get consent, many volunteered to participate. The interviews were again semi- structured, which lead to a lot of open and candid conversation. We believe it’s due to the anonymity it provides[4][5], even while contributing to a research study. While some responses were immediate, some chatted with us over time, which lead to interviews which extended over hours. This worked similarly to a diary study, since the user was disconnected from the researcher, [3] A subject shows us their phone during a contextual inquiry [4] A subject reveals deeply personal information during our interview over text.
  6. 6. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 6 but we did not complete a traditional diary study. The Digital Artifact Diagramming method involved the researchers creating a profile each on various dating apps to gain access to a plethora of profiles. We took around 500 screenshots of profiles, both male and female, with varying age, as a method of digital artifact collection. The screen shots typically consisted of the first page of a user’s profile. Affinity Diagramming seemed like the appropriate method to organize and analyse the huge amount of data. The screenshots were printed out and cut into pieces that would resemble the size of a phone, and we sorted them based on gender and age first, followed by trends that emerged from the profiles. As a part of our research, we also interviewed an expert, who works at Zoosk. This was conducted to know the intended purpose of the app, which helped us understand and differentiate between an app’s purpose from the maker’s point of view and that from the user’s perspective. Fieldwork Summary [5] A subject reveals problems meeting women of her orientation over chat. [6] A typical screenshot from our Digital Artifact Diagramming session
  7. 7. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 7 Digital Artifact Diagramming While trying to come up with a new method, we realised we had screenshots of plenty of user profiles on different platforms (dating applications). This was originally done as a part of digital artifact collection. But to analyze each and every one of the screenshots, seemed to be a herculean task. To synthesize the large amount of data, we decided to try out a new method, which we later termed “Digital Artifact Diagramming”. Inspired by the Affinity Diagramming method, which traditionally uses Sticky notes, we decided to use the screenshots instead. Several screen shots were printed on a single sheet and cut into individual pieces. It was important for each screen shot to have an individual thought. After segregating the screenshots into two groups - male and female, they were sorted by age. Then we looked for trends such as ‘selfies’, ‘group pictures’, ‘professionally taken photos’, ‘photos that indicate a hobby or interest’, ‘sports pictures’, ‘party pictures’, ‘dressed up pictures’, ‘overtly sexual pictures’, ‘pictures with animals/pets’, ‘pictures with kids’ and so on. We also noticed the high number of selfies in both men and women and the difference between group photos of men and group photos with women. The categories that emerged helped in gaining insights which lead to possible design directions. Researchers perform a Digital Artifact Diagram with screen shots from Tinder
  8. 8. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 8 Pros: • Works really well when we are dealing with a large amount of visual data. • Really helpful in clustering data to look for emerging trends or problem spaces. • Great way to visualize data when concepting. • Easy to see individual thought process. • Sparks conversations around data. Cons: • Time-consuming, when there’s a large amount of data. • Difficult to duplicate screenshots, to be included in multiple categories. • It’s possible to include redundant content. • Hard to physically move the notes. • They can’t be saved and retrieved quickly. • Requires all of the data to be captured in the same way. Digital Artifact Diagramming Researchers perform a Digital Artifact Diagram with screen shots from Tinder
  9. 9. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 9 Data Analysis After analyzing our data, we were able to learn quite a bit about the users of these apps. One thing we learned was how unsuccessful our subjects felt about their use of the applications. People often have specific goals when beginning to use a dating app, but after several months, frequently lose interest. This can happen because of a lack of connection, a series of bad dates, or being objectified within the app itself. We also learned that a lot of users will use multiple dating apps. Tinder and OKCupid being the most popular among the users we interviewed. Most users we studied will only use one at a time, but we found that almost all of them have at least tried more than one. We also discovered, unsurprisingly, that many people base a lot of their opinions of another individual on the picture they’ve selected. Our users were fairly evenly split on whether that was helpful, or made the app feel more superficial. One thing that was fairly universal among our users was that no one feels successful at starting conversations on dating apps. Common strategies included reading the other users profile to try to come up with something to say that would spark a conversation, or simply saying hello. Many of the female users we interviewed claimed that men who gave a short message or simply said “Hello” were ignored. Many female users refused to send the first message. Sometimes this was because they subscribed to common gender roles, or often because they simply had too many responses to their profile. Regardless, one of the main problems for users of dating sites is starting conversations. This is interesting because beginning the conversation is the key to creating the intimacy that these users are looking for. We found very clearly that these users are rarely finding intimacy through dating apps. We heard stories of people who have managed to build a long- term relationship that began on a dating app, but we were unable to find anyone in that situation to interview.
  10. 10. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 10 Insights Very few people prefer meeting people online, people want to meet others in person The first question we asked every subject was “What do you think is the best way to meet people, and why?” For almost all of them, the answer was “Not on a dating app”. There were some exceptions from people who claimed their work lives didn’t allow them to meet people in the traditional way, but for the most part, people preferred to meet others through friends of friends, or in social gatherings. “Well definitely not on the internet. Haha I think meeting people through friends is best. It’s in person and the person being met has a bit of credibility for not being a creep if you know someone who knows them.” --Not that Girl 22
  11. 11. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 11 Insights Everyone takes almost the exact same precautions. Telling a friend where they are going, making sure their cell phone is charged, not giving too much personal info until they know the person better, meeting in a public place. During our research, we asked people if they had met anyone in person after meeting them on a dating app. We found that almost everyone had met people in person. Interestingly, when asked about their precautions, almost everyone gave the exact same response, with very little variation. This speaks to the fear of dishonesty inherent with a dating app. Apps offer almost no proof that the person they have connected with is who they claim to be. We were unable to find how each user developed their precautions, but it’s clear that these precautions make the users feel safer to interact on these apps. “I always meet in a public place and I don’t give out many personal detail until I get to know somebody. I also make sure somebody knows where I am and I park safely.” Sarah
  12. 12. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 12 Insights Starting conversations on dating apps is very difficult, and it is incredibly important for men to stand out with their messages As discussed above, almost every user had issues starting a conversation. Men have a more of an issue here, because most of the women we interviewed refuse to start a conversation on a dating app. Rather, they wait for the man to begin the conversation. The reason for this is twofold. First, in traditional gender roles men are expected to initiate contact with a woman. Second, women often receive more messages than men do. One of our female subjects had over 400 unread messages. In this scenario, men must stand out in order to get the attention they’re seeking, and ultimately achieve intimacy. “Except for one out of ten times, it was me initiating the conversation, because I think if you are a female on a dating website, you don’t have to seek out applicants they kind of flood you...” Jordan
  13. 13. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 13 Insights Many people use dating apps as a way to waste time, rather than looking for someone to meet or date We asked many of our subjects what made them use a dating app at a particular time, and many responded that it was because they were bored. While many users created an account to find intimacy, after a few weeks or months, the app became more of a time waster to them. They would simply use it when they had nothing else to do. “Tinder is only when I got bored.” Lexi “ Last year, during my last semester in my undergrad, I had nothing to do, so I tried this” Yisi
  14. 14. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 14 Insights Some people use dating apps to find friends, rather than a romantic relationship While dating apps often promote the idea that you can find a romantic relationship with their service, we found several users who used the app to look for friends. One common scenario was using a dating app when moving to a new city. Some users would make use of it in order to meet new friends in an unfamiliar place, others found it useful after finding their social life stagnating. These users were not looking for a romantic relationship, and often found success using the app to find new friends. “I just thought it might be fun to try and find new people.” “I guess I would be interested in dating, but it’s not a priority. I would like to make friends first” Zackery
  15. 15. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 15 Insights Many people feel unsuccessful using dating apps A common theme among the users that we interviewed was a general feeling that they were not successful while using the app. Each user had their own definition of success, and the few who felt successful did not define their success on whether they found a long-term relationship. It seems that while dating apps bring people in by offering users a chance for intimacy, many of their users are not finding it there. “I’d say the rate is pretty similar for both (Tinder and OkCupid).. It was very low”. C1B1
  16. 16. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 16 Insights Specific patterns emerge when examining users profile pictures When examining the pictures that users of Tinder use to represent themselves, several specific patterns emerge. Self-taken pictures, or ‘selfies’ are very common on Tinder, for both men and women. Users will often use pictures that tell the other users something about their personalities or interests. On Tinder, this seems to be a response to the limited nature of the profile they can use. One big difference between the way women and men represent themselves on Tinder is through the use of group pictures. When men post a picture of themselves with other people, they often appear with other women, infrequently appearing with other men. However,Men posing with women on their Tinder profile picture
  17. 17. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 17 Insights when women post a group picture, our research shows that they almost always post a picture of themselves with other women. After asking a few people outside our group about their thoughts, it appears that men want to project that they are already comfortable with women and have female friends. On the other hand, women want to be careful not to project that they are involved with anyone. In fact, many of our male subjects noted that if they saw an image of a girl with a man, they would assume that woman was in a relationship with him. This goes back to the traditional gender roles we noted earlier. It appears that even on these dating apps, women are expected to be pure or virginal, while it is accepted that men will have multiple partners or suitors. Specific patterns emerge when examining users profile pictures (cont.) Women posing with other women on their Tinder profile picture
  18. 18. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 18 Design Directions Eventer This feature leverages facebook style events to aggregate people at an event “We’re going to this place at this time, come meet us in person”. This would allow users of a dating site to meet people in a large group all at once, rather than just one on one. Our research showed that our users are very willing to meet other dating site users in person, but use lots of precautions. Meeting people in person in a large group makes it easier for everyone to feel safe and less awkward about being alone with someone they don’t know that well. Hopefully this app will encourage people to meet in person in an acceptable and safe way.
  19. 19. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 19 Design Directions Dating Profile Review This feature offers simple suggestions about the type of picture you’re using, and makes suggestions for opening lines, as well as analyzing what someone is about to say and tells the user how successful that opening line has been in starting conversations. From research, we learned that both men and women have certain criteria about what kind of pictures are working better to attract them and what ruins it, as well as preferences about opening lines. So this app can analyze how it’s users are presenting themselves, and provides people with suggestions about what pictures will work to attract more people and what will not. Based on these suggestions, people can choose to change or not. In this way, it decreases the possibility of being dismissed based on viewing pictures, and creates more opportunities for conversations.
  20. 20. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 20 Design Directions Sticker Chatting This feature doesn’t allow text chatting immediately, but offers icons or stickers to express emotions before deciding to meet or talk with the other person with words. These icons would have to be carefully curated by the app to ensure a good conversation is possible. From research, we learned that some people will ruin the conversation from the first sentence. For example, when a man just says hi, the woman might think he is not paying much attention to her, and doesn’t chat with him. So in this way, people start with stickers to chat, these stickers can clearly express emotions. It starts the conversation in an interesting way. If the users become interested based on the stickers, they can continue chatting with words. This method would reward the creativity of the user, and allow people who aren’t as skilled at conversation a chance to interest a potential match.
  21. 21. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 21 Design Directions Build-A-Date This feature would allow a user to “Build a date”. Rather than just suggest a simple coffee date, you can pick a series of activities and locations. So “Hiking” and then a specific trail or route. Or a restaurant with a specific meal choice selected. Offering more information will give the other person an opportunity to feel more comfortable that they are compatible. Our research showed that women prefer men who put some effort into their approaches. Having a full date already planned could show a potential match that they have a strong plan, and can decide more easily if they match. It also provides the user the ability to see if the other user likes the same type of food and activity that they do.
  22. 22. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 22 Design Directions Game Based Chat Room For this feature, instead of a chat room, people are put together in a game room of sorts, and can play either creative building games, or simple card games while chatting. Our research shows that almost everyone has a hard time starting a conversation over a dating app, with many women ignoring men who can’t come up with a good opening line. Giving the two users something to talk about while they get to know each other can help break down this barrier.
  23. 23. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 23 Design Directions What’s In My Bag Dating A dating site based on “What’s in my bag?” Your profile picture instead of your face is just the contents of your bag. This would offer users the chance to show off their personality through objects. Our research shows that many users will put a lot of stock into the profile picture. While many users claim to look through profiles for more information of an individual, during our contextual inquiries, we found that many users will simply move past anyone they don’t find superficially attractive. This sort of site would allow users personality to show before having to worry about sending a personal picture.
  24. 24. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 24 Design Directions Video Introductions A feature that leverages Vine style short videos that allow people to introduce themselves creatively. This could help people get past superficial aspects and give deeper insight into the other persons personality. In the existing apps, there are several ways like pictures, interests and biographies for people to get to know each other at the beginning, and help people decide if they want to pursue a match. Is there any other ways to show one’s personality, and also make it more attractive and interesting? We came up with the idea of using videos to sell yourself. People also pay more attention to videos rather than still pictures or words. Also the video is customizable, and create more opportunity for creative things. This helps solve the problem that many users have with starting conversations on dating apps. It will reward a user’s creativity, and not just how attractive their profile picture is. A sketch of this idea appears on the next page.
  25. 25. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 25 Design Directions Video Introductions
  26. 26. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 26 Design Directions Profile Rating System In this feature, people can rate other users based on various criteria, like reliability, humor and other appropriate factors. One of the main concerns of our users was safety during an in person meeting because of how easy it is to be dishonest on the dating apps. So we allowed users to give others a rating. With the overall rating, people can see more about how other users have interacted with them, and whether or not their profile is an honest representation of them.
  27. 27. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 27 Design Directions Interaction Training This feature will offer a user a chance to find a better way to communicate with the opposite sex by giving them the opportunity to learn about responding to them through a simple game. As we learned from research, how people communicate with each other has a significant impact on the relationship, and some wrong reactions might result in killing the connection. So this app can help train a man or woman to know more about what others might be thinking rather than what they are saying, and also how to react to it successfully.
  28. 28. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 28 Design Directions Let’s Go Grocery Shopping! In this service, people are connected with individuals in their area, and they set up a time to go meet at a grocery store. This could even be sponsored by the grocery store themselves. They will use a specialized shopping cart with two sides so they can both shop together. The goal of dating is also finding ways to know more about a person. Our research shows that users of dating sites prefer meeting other people in person, so this service could help with that, giving our users a safe space to get to know someone by seeing what kinds of foods they enjoy and learning more about them personally along the way.
  29. 29. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 29 Design Directions Discount Dating This feature is a way to encourage people to meet in person. Two people can meet on a dating app, and through the cooperation of local businesses, can schedule a date at a bar or other location, and show a coupon from the app that gives them some kind of discount. This is good for the businesses as it brings in more customers, and a good incentive for people meeting on the app to visit a public location for safety. Our research shows that people generally take the same set of precautions in every case. They prefer to meet in a public place and will inform friends of where they are going. This feature would help build that precaution into preparations from the app. The users would be selecting a public place, and the restaurant could even keep a record of when that couple visited the restaurant.
  30. 30. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 30 Design Directions Silly Pictures For this feature, rather than using charming and beautiful pictures, users are encouraged to use silly pictures. The silly pictures can act as a conversation starter. If all the people use silly pictures, it will be a fun experience to go through other’s profile pictures to start a conversation based on it. If my picture makes you laugh, why not talk to me? I bring you fun! We spoke to one user in particular who claimed that any profile that made him laugh would imediately get a message from him. This could work as a conversation starter and reward creativity, rather than simply good looks.
  31. 31. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 31 Design Directions Haaaaaave you met? This app flips the normal dating app structure. In most apps, users are expected to sell themselves to others. However, we found in our research that very few users have the ability to do that effectively. In this app, a third party creates the profile for a friend, and describes them to others. They then screen and choose matches for their friend, only setting up a date when they feel confident they’ve found someone interesting. This could even be taken further for the third party to chaperone the first date. We spoke to one user who had had several dating experiences with men who were very socially awkward and had a difficult time interacting with women. This sort of app could help those people who have trouble selling themselves on these apps, and also improve safety, as a trusted third party would be involved. A sketch of this idea appears on the next page.
  32. 32. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 32 Design Directions Haaaaaave you met? sketch
  33. 33. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 33 Design Directions Haaaaaave you met? sketch
  34. 34. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 34 Design Directions Bookstore Date This design is similar to the grocery store meetup in that two people will meet at a public place to begin their date. In this format, two people will be matched at a bookstore. After a short chat, the two participants will be tasked with finding a book that the other person will enjoy. After a search, the participants meetup again and pitch their choices to the other. This gives them a chance to see the taste and perspective of the person they are interacting with. Once they have exchanged books, they can choose what to do after that. Perhaps they will each read the books, perhaps they won’t. But this is a low impact method of meeting someone new and getting to know them quickly. Our research shows that many people prefer to meet in person, rather than online. Using this method could give them a chance to do this in a safe place, and potentially lead to intimacy down the road.
  35. 35. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 35 Design Directions Bookstore Date
  36. 36. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 36 Data Visualization In our research, we found several sites offer a match based on a percentage. But what’s a 28%? Is it related to education, personality, interests, looks, long-term/short-term goals? This chart visualizes a person into various data. Then each person will have their own visualization chart. Based on the chart, people can match with others more accurately, and they can know more about others by reading their chart. Our research shows that people will read others profiles, trying to find information to exclude them or include them as a match. This could potentially speed up that process. Design Directions
  37. 37. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 37 Kissing Booth This app gives people the chance for some intimacy before they meet the other person. Based on the feeling of kissing, people can decide whether they want to date them. What are people’s goal for using a dating app? Either to find a person to hook up or to find a true love? How do they evaluate which person they will match with? Pictures? Interests? Habits? Personalities? Then what else is important? The feeling of being with that person, the feeling of a kiss. So why not try it out? The feeling of a kiss in an important thing when deciding if you want to pursue a relationship. Our research shows that our users often feel unsuccessful in dating apps, and they aren’t finding the intimacy they desire. This design could give them the chance to start with intimacy before deciding to pursue anything further. Two participants would be placed on opposite sides of a wall with a small space where they could interact by kissing. A chaperone could be present to facilitate safety. The participants could kiss and then decide after if they wanted to meet the other person. This design definitely isn’t for everyone, but for those adventurous spirits, it could create a fun and memorable experience. Design Directions
  38. 38. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 38 Kissing Booth Design Directions
  39. 39. Looking For Love (in all the wrong places) - Kudzai Chinyadza, Andy Hunsucker, Anusha Radhakrishnan, Yu Xu 39 Conclusion We feel that this study lead us to some interesting new design ideas. It is clear from studying these apps and their users that people rarely find what they’re looking for. The gamified aspect of these apps rewards superficial aspects of people’s looks, and rarely leads to a deep connection. The disposable nature of matches on apps like Tinder and OKCupid means that users can easily dismiss anyone for even the most minor infraction, never working on getting to know someone better to create anything other than superficial, brief physical intimacy. These apps also offer users the chance to be dishonest with others about their intentions, and requires users to create elaborate safety plans before they can meet another person. Our designs in this space focused on trying to reward the users creativity and personality when presenting themselves on a dating app, and making it easier and safer to meet others in person. We also wanted to make it easier for users to start an interaction, which we found was incredibly difficult for almost everyone in these dating apps. Tinder does give you a license to objectify other people. People become disposable on Tinder. You don’t like this one? On to next one... Lexi
  40. 40. Digital Artifact Diagramming This method is an exploratory means adapted from affinity diagramming. It is useful with help- ing designers to explore large data sets of digital artifact observations and organize them into meaningful ways. The data is collected by taking screen shots of a pre-determined interactive system with specific criteria or patterns being assessed for the study. In our case we were studying gam- ification of online dating apps, so we narrowed our analysis to user-profiles on Tinder as it is currently the most popular gamified app. How it works The researcher’s goal is to capture pre-existing data sets from interactive systems. In our case, we wanted to gather data from user profiles of a dating site. Within the dating app context, the researcher takes screenshots of each user profile. Each screen shot needs to represent a single piece of information or observation like the sticky notes in an affinity diagram. It is important that the researcher identifies the criteria in which they use to determine an appro- priate data set. After the screen shots are taken the researcher proceeds to print out these screen-shots. For printing it is encouraged that the researcher print several screen shots per sheet, in order to have small index size data sets when the screen shots are cut up. After this the screen-shots are then placed on a large surface where the researcher will start clustering the screen shots into meaningful groups. This process is supposed to be exploratory, and therefore the researcher needs to keep an open mind when participating in this activity. When working in a group, it is important for the researchers to complete this activity using the think-aloud-protocol. This will help the team know what each person is thinking, and this will allow for an open communication in the team concerning the data. Once the data is grouped, and the researchers have noticed certain trends, the clustered screenshots will be labeled appropriately to summarize the observations. Further Reading How to Affinity Diagram Hanington, Bruce Martin, Bella Universal Methods of Design page 14. Rockport Publishers 2012 SYNTHESIS/ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE Digital Artifact Diagramming is an exploratory analysis method used to understand behaviors and patterns of individuals on their online profiles. Pros: • Works really well when we are dealing with a large amount of visual data. • Really helpful in clustering data to look for emerging trends or problem spaces. • Easy to see individual thought process • Sparks conversations around data within a tem Cons: • Time-consuming, when there’s a large amount of data. • It’s possible to include redundant content.

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