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  • Knowledge Society AgendaInformation society refers to a society in which information is as good as a freight or anything than could be shared amongst people from one department to the next. The society is of the new high technological divide.
  • Knowledge society refers to a community, in which knowledge should bring them fairness, unity, social equality and peace. It is a society in which knowledge could be a force for changing society. A knowledge society is a society which should provide universal and equitable access to information (UNESCO).
  • Integrating Information and Communication Technology (ICT) assists in building the Knowledge Society by:Learning to know ICT and accessing KnowledgeLearning to develop new capacities through ICTLearning to live together through new communicationLearning to be a part of the knowledge society through personal development
  • ICT is the new Revolution of knowledge, i.e. each discipline, its concepts,processes, methods, resources available, and so on. Education needs networks of knowledge. The links contribute to the elaboration and acquisition of Knowledge.
  • Take into account of the following:• new knowledge• access to knowledge• communication in a network• new teaching, new learning• new tools, new resources, new pedagogies• new space and time•new teaching profession
  • The aim for education is to build a collective intelligence which is a role for teachers. The (open) classroom is the first place where collective intelligence can be built and used. It allows for the development of collective intelligence of pupils, develops the capacity for collaborative work and use collaborative work.
  • e-Learning refers to: •not only technology, but a new conception of teaching, training, learning•managing differently time and space•Internet and virtuality•individualization and collaboration•Interactivity: interactive content and interactive tutoringNew competences for teachers who are teaching in the knowledge society, teaching in the networked society, and developing a collective intelligence:TechnologyNew pedagogical possibilitiesNew management of time and spaceNew knowledgeNew networked form of knowledgeNew expectations of Society
  • ICT confirms the essential and core role of the teacher to be the mediator between knowledge and the student. As educators, we want not only an Information Society, but a Knowledge Society, enabling all children and all people to access Knowledge and to benefit from being educated. Education is a key issue in the Knowledge Society, and Educators have a major mission. Particularly, it is the responsibility of all educators and decision-makers around the world to help developing countries take part in the developments of ICT in Education. Six major areas will shape a beneficial use of ICT in Education which are:
  • • Digital Solidarity• Learners and Lifelong Learning• Decision-Making Strategies• Networking• Research• Teachers
  • Pervasiveness of TechnologyThe policy goal of the technology literacy approach is to enable learners, citizens and the workforce to use ICT to support social development and improve economic productivity. Related policy goals include increasing enrolments, making high-quality resources available to all, and improving literacy skills. Teachers should be aware of these goals and be able to identify the components of education reform programmes that correspond to these policy goals. Corresponding changes in the curriculum entailed by this approach might include improving basic literacy skills through technology and adding the development of ICT skills into relevant curriculum contexts. This will involve setting aside time within the traditional curricula of other subjects for the incorporation of a range of relevant productivity tools and technology resources. Changes in pedagogical practice involve the use of various ICT tools and digital content as part of whole class, group and individual student activities.
  • Changes in teacher practice involve knowing where and when (as well as when not) to use technology for classroom activities and presentations, for management tasks, and for acquisition of additional subject matter and pedagogical knowledge in support of the teachers’ own professional learning. Little change in social structure of the class occurs in this approach, other than perhaps the placement and integration of technology resources in the classroom or in labs to ensure equitable access.
  • The technologies involved may include computers along with productivity software; drill and practice software, tutorials, and web content; and the use of networks for management purposes.
  • In the early stages of development, teacher competences related to the technology literacy approach include basic digital literacy skills and digital citizenship, along with the ability to select and use appropriate off:
  • –the shelf educational tutorials, games, drill-and-practice software, and web content in computer laboratories or with limited classroom facilities to complement standard curriculum objectives, assessment approaches, unit plans, and didactic teaching methods
  • Teachers must also be able to use ICT to manage classroom data and support their own professional learning
  • Technology literacy approach in practice:Understanding ICT in educationCurriculum and assessmentPedagogyICTOrganization and administrationTeacher professional learning
  • Education for All
  • The six Education for All goals are:Expand early childhood care and educationProvide free and compulsory primary education to allPromote learning and life skills for young people and adultsIncrease adult literacy by 50%Achieve gender parity by 2005, gender equality by 2015Improve the quality of education
  • It must be acknowledged that significant measurable progress has been accomplished in many aspects, such as increased enrolment and expansion of free primary education. The issue of quality education for everyone has not been addressed. Teacher recruitment, their working conditions, their appropriate remuneration, as well as the quality of their initial and continuous education are crucial factors if quality learning is to become a reality for all. The systematic and growing practice of engaging unqualified and underpaid contract teachers who lack initial or adequate teacher education and career prospects, is a major contributing factor to the degradation of quality of education. The issue of stable and adequate financing is crucial. Basic education is recognized as a framework in which EFA goals can be reached, matching quality and equity. The gap between those who are improving and those who lag behind is growing.
  • Three main challenges in relation to quality of education:Learning outcomes should be monitoredLearning environments must be improvedAttracting more and better teachers
  • Wealth is a major source of disparities in education, in addition to gender and proximity to urban areas.
  • Tackling the factors contributing to exclusion in education requires decisive action, such as introducing and enforcing legislation prohibiting exclusion, and eliminating gender bias in textbooks.
  • Also important is improving the learning environment, with special emphasis on school supplies, safer and more hygienic facilities, and multilingual instruction based on the mother tongue.
  • Inclusive education policies for specific target populations are needed. Culturally sensitive materials, strategies enhancing cultural identity, and more resources can empower students in multicultural societies.
  • Governments have the responsibility to protect excluded and vulnerable groups. That means recognizing their educational rights and measuring their needs, providing teachers with adequate training, facilities and culturally sensitive resources.
  • Will we make it financially? The answer to that question is ultimately determined by concrete steps and not by high level meetings alone. One such concrete step is setting aside funds to make EFA 2015 a reality rather than a dream. These are funds from national governments and the international donor community.
  • Present future national strategic objectivesAs a result of Government’s review of the state of education, a number of challenges were identified as barriers to improving the system of quality basic education.
  • The key challenges that have been identified as barriers include:Quality learner outcomes are not optimal across all grades.The quality and quantity of learner and teacher support materials are not adequate to support quality learning.The quality of school-based tests and examinations is not of the required standard and is not being moderated or benchmarked.The quality of support from districts and specifically school support personnel has not been constructive or responsive to the needs of the schools’ management.
  • The key goals and priorities for basic education relate to three main outcomes on learner performance and enrolments within the stated timeframes. These are as follows:
  • •Increase the number of learners in Grade 3 who by the end of the year have mastered the minimum language and numeracy competencies for Grade 3.•Increase the number of learners in Grade 6 who by the end of the year have mastered the minimum language and mathematics competencies for Grade 6.•Increase the number of learners in Grade 9 who by the end of the year have mastered the minimum language and mathematics competencies for Grade 9.
  • Increase the number of Grade 12 learners who become eligible for a Bachelors programme at university.Increase the number of Grade 12 learners who pass mathematics.Increase the number Grade 12 learners who pass physical science.
  • Improve the average performance in languages of Grade 6 learners.Improve the average performance in mathematics of Grade 6 learners.Improve the average performance in mathematics of Grade 8 learners. Ensure that all children remain effectively enrolled in school up to the year in which they turn 15.
  • Improve the access of children to quality early childhood development (ECD) below Grade 1.Improve the grade promotion of learners through the Grades 1 to 9 phases of school.Improve the access of youth to Further Education and Training beyond Grade 9.
  • Initiatives regarding continuous professional development of teachersBy incorporating certain essential principles, this document reflects a holistic approach to teacher development in ICT. It acknowledges that ICT skills cannot be practised in isolation from their context. It also acknowledges that the development of ICT skills and knowledge for teachers should be an integral part of initial and continuing teacher development programmes, as reflected in the National Policy Framework for Teacher Education and Development in South Africa.
  • e-Education and implementation of the National Curriculum Statement:•The social transformation of post-apartheid South African society•The implementation of an outcomes-based approach to education•The development of high levels of knowledge and skills•The integration and applied competence across subjects and fields of learning•The valuing of indigenous knowledge systems•Increasing the credibility, quality and efficiency of education in South Africa
  • The following guidelines should be taken into consideration when implementing development programmes:
  • There is no single best practice or general recipe for success.Teacher development programmes should be flexible in access, modes of delivery and content in order to make learning possible in meaningful and equitable ways.
  • Teaching practice, including classroom organization, will change if ICT is integrated effectively in teaching and learning.Teacher development should be managed.Programmes need not necessarily provide training in advance of requirements, but can concentrate on giving essential training as the need arises.
  • Continuation of guidelinesDevelopment programmes should not take teachers out of classrooms during normal school hours, so flexible delivery modes for training will be required.ICT development for teaching and learning does not happen in isolation, it also impacts on the management and administration of a school.
  • Cont……………………………..ICT development has an impact on whole-school development. This implies that teachers at a school should develop a community of practice and support one another in developing ICT skills.Teacher needs and interests should be the driving force for their professional growth.
  • The following approaches should be adopted in ICT skills development for student and practising teachers:
  • All higher education institutions should offer compulsory ICT in teaching and learning in teacher development courses (up to appropriation level).•Students currently in higher education institutions should be fast-tracked to bring them to at least the adoption level by the end of their studies.•From 2008, all students leaving higher education for the teaching profession should have reached at least the adaptation level.•All practising teachers who have access to ICT should, as a minimum, be trained to the adaptation level by 2010.•Subject advisors are to be trained up to appropriation level through a focused intervention from the national Department of Education. Once trained, they will be able to assist teachers to utilise access to computers.
  • •All practicing teachers who have access to ICT should, as a minimum, be trained to the adaptation level by 2010.•Subject advisors are to be trained up to appropriation level through a focused intervention from the national Department of Education. Once trained, they will be able to assist teachers to utilize access to computers.
  • http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/46/Internet.JPG/200px-Internet.JPGhttp://www.instantdisplay.co.uk/ict.jpghttp://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/About/General/2012/11/26/1353950494566/Students-using-computers--008.jpghttp://nazz1992.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/ict-logo2.jpghttp://img.allvoices.com/thumbs/event/609/480/87264176-information-communication.jpg
  • My presentation pfs3a10@gmail.com

    1. 1. Knowledge Society AgendaInformation society refers toa society in whichinformation is as good as afreight. The society is of thenew high technologicaldivide.
    2. 2. Knowledge society refers to a community, in whichknowledge should bring them fairness, unity, socialequality and peace. It is a society in whichknowledge could be a force for changing society. Aknowledge society is a society which should provideuniversal and equitable access to information(UNESCO).
    3. 3. Integrating Information and Communication Technology(ICT) assists in building the Knowledge Society by:• Learning to know ICT and accessingKnowledge• Learning to develop new capacities throughICT• Learning to live together through newcommunication• Learning to be a part of the knowledge societythrough personal development
    4. 4. ICT is the new Revolution ofknowledge• This includes each discipline, itsconcepts, processes, methods, resourcesavailable, and so on.• Education needs networks of knowledge.• The links contribute to the elaboration andacquisition of Knowledge.
    5. 5. Take into account of the following:• new knowledge• access to knowledge• communication in a network• new teaching, new learning• new tools, new resources, new pedagogies• new space and time• new teaching profession
    6. 6. The aim for education is to build acollective intelligence which is a role forteachers. The (open) classroom is the firstplace where collective intelligence can bebuilt and used. It allows for thedevelopment of collective intelligence ofpupils, develops the capacity forcollaborative work and use collaborativework.
    7. 7. e-Learning refers to:•not only technology, but anew conception ofteaching, training, learning•managing differently timeand space•Internet and virtuality•individualization andcollaboration•Interactivity:interactivecontent and interactivetutoringNew competences for teacherswho are teaching in theknowledge society, teaching inthe networked society, anddeveloping a collectiveintelligence:• Technology• New pedagogicalpossibilities• New management of timeand space• New knowledge• New networked form ofknowledge• New expectations of Society
    8. 8. • ICT confirms the essential and core role of theteacher to be the mediator between knowledgeand the student. As educators, we want not onlyan Information Society, but a KnowledgeSociety, enabling all children and all people toaccess Knowledge and to benefit from beingeducated. Education is a key issue in theKnowledge Society, and Educators have a majormission. Particularly, it is the responsibility of alleducators and decision-makers around the worldto help developing countries take part in thedevelopments of ICT in Education. Six majorareas will shape a beneficial use of ICT inEducation which are:
    9. 9. • Digital Solidarity• Learners and LifelongLearning• Decision-Making Strategies• Networking• Research• Teachers
    10. 10. Pervasiveness of Technology• The policy goal of the technology literacyapproach is to enable learners, citizens andthe workforce to use ICT to support socialdevelopment and improve economicproductivity. Related policy goals includeincreasing enrolments, making high-qualityresources available to all, and improvingliteracy skills. Teachers should be aware ofthese goals and be able to identify thecomponents of education reform programmesthat correspond to these policy goals.Corresponding changes in the curriculumentailed by this approach might include
    11. 11. Changes in teacher practice involve knowing whereand when (as well as when not) to use technologyfor classroom activities and presentations, formanagement tasks, and for acquisition of additionalsubject matter and pedagogical knowledge insupport of the teachers’ own professional learning.Little change in social structure of the class occursin this approach, other than perhaps the placementand integration of technology resources in theclassroom or in labs to ensure equitable access.
    12. 12. The technologies involved mayinclude computers along withproductivity software• drill and practice software• tutorials• web content• and the use of networks for managementpurposes
    13. 13. In the early stages ofdevelopment, teachercompetences related to thetechnology literacy approachinclude basic digital literacy skillsand digital citizenship, along withthe ability to select and useappropriate off:
    14. 14. • –the shelf educational tutorials• games• drill-and-practice software• web content in computer laboratories or withlimited classroom facilities to complementstandard curriculum objectives• assessment approaches• unit plans• didactic teaching methods
    15. 15. Teachers must also be able touse ICT to manage classroomdata and support their ownprofessional learning
    16. 16. Technology literacy approach inpractice:Understanding ICT in educationCurriculum and assessmentPedagogyICTOrganisation and administrationTeacher professional learning
    17. 17. Education for All
    18. 18. The six Education for All goals are:• Expand early childhood care and education• Provide free and compulsory primary education toall• Promote learning and life skills for young peopleand adults• Increase adult literacy by 50%• Achieve gender parity by 2005, gender equalityby 2015• Improve the quality of education
    19. 19. • It must be acknowledged that significantmeasurable progress has been accomplished inmany aspects, such as increased enrolment andexpansion of free primary education. The issueof quality education for everyone has not beenaddressed. Teacher recruitment, their workingconditions, their appropriate remuneration, aswell as the quality of their initial and continuouseducation are crucial factors if quality learning isto become a reality for all. The systematic andgrowing practice of engaging unqualified andunderpaid contract teachers who lack initial oradequate teacher education and careerprospects, is a major contributing factor to thedegradation of quality of education. The issue ofstable and adequate financing is crucial. Basiceducation is recognized as a framework in whichEFA goals can be reached, matching quality andequity. The gap between those who are
    20. 20. Three main challenges in relationto quality of education:Learning outcomes should be monitoredLearning environments must be improvedAttracting more and better teachers
    21. 21. Wealth is a major source ofdisparities in education, in additionto gender and proximity to urbanareas.
    22. 22. Tackling the factors contributing toexclusion in education requiresdecisive action, such as:• introducing and enforcing legislationprohibiting exclusion• eliminating gender bias in textbooks
    23. 23. Also important is improving thelearning environment, with specialemphasis on:• school supplies• safer and more hygienic facilities• multilingual instruction based on the mothertongue
    24. 24. Inclusive education policies forspecific target populations areneeded. Culturally sensitivematerials, strategies enhancingcultural identity, and moreresources can empower students inmulticultural societies.
    25. 25. Governments have theresponsibility to protect excludedand vulnerable groups. Thatmeans:• recognizing their educational rights andmeasuring their needs• providing teachers with adequatetraining, facilities and culturally sensitiveresources.
    26. 26. Will we make it financially?The answer to that question is ultimatelydetermined by concrete steps and not by highlevel meetings alone. One such concrete step issetting aside funds to make EFA 2015 a realityrather than a dream. These are funds fromnational governments and the international donorcommunity.
    27. 27. Present future national strategicobjectivesAs a result of Government’s reviewof the state of education, a numberof challenges were identified asbarriers to improving the system ofquality basic education.
    28. 28. The key challenges that have beenidentified as barriers include:• Quality learner outcomes are not optimal across allgrades.• The quality and quantity of learner and teacher supportmaterials are not adequate to support quality learning.• The quality of school-based tests and examinations isnot of the required standard and is not being moderatedor benchmarked.• The quality of support from districts and specificallyschool support personnel has not been constructive orresponsive to the needs of the schools’ management.
    29. 29. The key goals and priorities for basiceducation relate to three main outcomes onlearner performance and enrolments withinthe stated timeframes. These are as follows:
    30. 30. • Increase the number of learners in Grade 3who by the end of the year have mastered theminimum language and numeracycompetencies for Grade 3.• Increase the number of learners in Grade 6who by the end of the year have mastered theminimum language and mathematicscompetencies for Grade 6.• Increase the number of learners in Grade 9who by the end of the year have mastered theminimum language and mathematicscompetencies for Grade 9.
    31. 31. • Increase the number of Grade 12 learners whobecome eligible for a Bachelors programme atuniversity.• Increase the number of Grade 12 learners whopass mathematics.• Increase the number Grade 12 learners whopass physical science.
    32. 32. • Improve the average performance inlanguages of Grade 6 learners.• Improve the average performance inmathematics of Grade 6 learners.• Improve the average performance inmathematics of Grade 8 learners.• Ensure that all children remain effectivelyenrolled in school up to the year in which theyturn 15.
    33. 33. • Improve the access of children to quality earlychildhood development (ECD) below Grade 1.• Improve the grade promotion of learnersthrough the Grades 1 to 9 phases of school.• Improve the access of youth to FurtherEducation and Training beyond Grade 9.
    34. 34. Initiatives regarding continuousprofessional development ofteachersBy incorporating certain essential principles, thisdocument reflects a holistic approach to teacherdevelopment in ICT. It acknowledges that ICT skillscannot be practised in isolation from their context. Italso acknowledges that the development of ICTskills and knowledge for teachers should be anintegral part of initial and continuing teacherdevelopment programmes, as reflected in theNational Policy Framework for Teacher Educationand Development in South Africa.
    35. 35. e-Education and implementation ofthe National Curriculum Statement:•The social transformation of post-apartheid SouthAfrican society•The implementation of an outcomes-based approach toeducation•The development of high levels of knowledge andskills•The integration and applied competence across subjectsand fields of learning•The valuing of indigenous knowledge systems•Increasing the credibility, quality and efficiency ofeducation in South Africa
    36. 36. The following guidelines should betaken into consideration whenimplementing developmentprogrammes:
    37. 37. There is no single best practice or generalrecipe for success.Teacher development programmes shouldbe flexible in access, modes of deliveryand content in order to make learningpossible in meaningful and equitableways.
    38. 38. • Teaching practice, including classroomorganisation, will change if ICT isintegrated effectively in teaching andlearning.• Teacher development should be managed.• Programmes need not necessarily providetraining in advance of requirements, butcan concentrate on giving essentialtraining as the need arises.
    39. 39. Continuation of guidelines• Development programmes should nottake teachers out of classroomsduring normal school hours, soflexible delivery modes for trainingwill be required.• ICT development for teaching andlearning does not happen in isolation, italso impacts on the management andadministration of a school.
    40. 40. Cont……………………………..• ICT development has an impact onwhole-school development. This impliesthat teachers at a school should develop acommunity of practice and support oneanother in developing ICT skills.• Teacher needs and interests should be thedriving force for their professionalgrowth.
    41. 41. The following approachesshould be adopted in ICTskills development forstudent and practisingteachers:
    42. 42. •All higher education institutions should offercompulsory ICT in teaching and learning in teacherdevelopment courses (up to appropriation level).•Students currently in higher education institutionsshould be fast-tracked to bring them to at least theadoption level by the end of their studies.•From 2008, all students leaving higher education forthe teaching profession should have reached at leastthe adaptation level.
    43. 43. •All practicing teachers who have accessto ICT should, as a minimum, be trainedto the adaptation level by 2010.•Subject advisors are to be trained up toappropriation level through a focusedintervention from the nationalDepartment of Education. Oncetrained, they will be able to assistteachers to utilize access to computers.
    44. 44. Reference list• http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/46/Internet.JPG/200px-Internet.JPG• http://www.instantdisplay.co.uk/ict.jpg• http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/About/General/2012/11/26/1353950494566/Students-using-computers--008.jpg• http://nazz1992.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/ict-logo2.jpg• http://img.allvoices.com/thumbs/event/609/480/87264176-information-communication.jpg
    45. 45. • https://edulink.uj.ac.za/webapps/blackboard/execute/content/file?cmd=view&content_id=_421218_1&course_id=_12958_1&target=blank• https://edulink.uj.ac.za/webapps/blackboard/execute/content/file?cmd=view&content_id=_421221_1&course_id=_12958_1&target=blank• https://edulink.uj.ac.za/webapps/blackboard/execute/content/file?cmd=view&content_id=_421222_1&course_id=_12958_1&target=blank• https://edulink.uj.ac.za/webapps/blackboard/execute/content/file?cmd=view&content_id=_421223_1&course_id=_12958_1&target=blank• https://edulink.uj.ac.za/webapps/blackboard/execute/content/file?cmd=view&content_id=_422944_1&course_id=_12958_1&target=blank• https://edulink.uj.ac.za/webapps/blackboard/execute/content/file?cmd=view&content_id=_428825_1&course_id=_12958_1

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