Presentatie Juan Senor - Mediafacts Uitgeverscongres

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Presentatie Juan Senor - Mediafacts Uitgeverscongres

  1. 1. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport Innovation Media Consulting presents: www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Thursday, 5 June 14
  2. 2. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport Dolf van den Brink “De uitgever van de toekomst zal een zeer beweeglijk en associatief denkend mens moeten zijn.” “The publisher of the future will have to be a very dynamic person, who thinks in a associative way” Thursday, 5 June 14
  3. 3. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  4. 4. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  5. 5. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  6. 6. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  7. 7. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  8. 8. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport Innovation Media Consulting presents: www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Thursday, 5 June 14
  9. 9. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  10. 10. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport This year: For the first time, clear cases of success and clear paths to get there Thursday, 5 June 14
  11. 11. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  12. 12. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport 5keys to success: Thursday, 5 June 14
  13. 13. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport 5keys to success: 1. Mobile will be the dominant platform Thursday, 5 June 14
  14. 14. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport 5keys to success: 1. Mobile will be the dominant platform 2. Video will be the dominant mode; Thursday, 5 June 14
  15. 15. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport 5keys to success: 1. Mobile will be the dominant platform 2. Video will be the dominant mode; 3. Native advertising will be dominant vehicle; Thursday, 5 June 14
  16. 16. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport 5keys to success: 1. Mobile will be the dominant platform 2. Video will be the dominant mode; 3. Native advertising will be dominant vehicle; 4. Programmatic will be dominant method; Thursday, 5 June 14
  17. 17. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport 5keys to success: 1. Mobile will be the dominant platform 2. Video will be the dominant mode; 3. Native advertising will be dominant vehicle; 4. Programmatic will be dominant method; 5. Big data will drive more decision Thursday, 5 June 14
  18. 18. ooks about innovation are often guesswork. Maybe this idea will work. Or this one. Or that one. Maybe…. In years past, we have published a lot of those types of case studies. We often felt as though we were like the editors of the famous US long-range weather-predicting publication, The Farmer’s Almanac: Looking at the best available data and hazarding our best guess. Not this year. This year we feel like editors of a guide rather than a forecast. Among many others, five major changes are exploding on the magazine media scene that will definitely affect publishing for years B to come: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, programmatic advertising, video, and native advertising. This past year was stunning for the speed with which these five phenomena moved from the idea, early adoption, or too-resource-in- tensive stage to becoming accessible, critical elements of publishing. Mobile will very soon become the dominant platform for information distribution and consumption, and it is so revolutionary that some are calling it a “do-over” chance for legacy media who got the whole internet thing so terribly wrong. Meanwhile, video has also quickly become themosteffective,mostpowerful,andfastest -growing method of delivering content and advertising to the largest audience, all inwaysthatareincreasinglyaccessibletoall publishers, not just those with big budgets. Programmatic advertising suddenly ap- pears on its way to becoming the way most ads will be sold and scheduled Big data is now able to put serious science and analysis behind every decision, from content to advertising to new products to customer relations. Not that every decision should be data-driven--but we’re fools to ignore it. And, finally, native advertising is revo- lutionising the world of content, advertiser -magazine relationships, advertiser-reader relationships, and revenue models. Of course, there is a lot more in this book, including case studies about programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, Google Glass, paywalls, innovation labs, e-newslet- ters, publishing frequency, startups to watch, events as revenue producers, and more. And, of course, our annual favourite: Odd, edgy, and envelope-pushing magazine innovations (look for the magazines that turn into flowers and print magazines as wifi hot spots!) Bottom line? This year, you can take this book home and say: Here’s a roadmap. Bon voyage! John Wilpers Juan Señor Juan Antonio Giner Co-editors Prescriptions instead of prognostications Major, successful innovations , especially in mobile, big data, video, and native advertising, are finally laying out a clear roadmap to success Editors JohnWilpers JuanSeñor JuanAntonioGiner wilpers@innovation-mediaconsulting.com senor@innovation-mediaconsulting.com giner@innovation-mediaconsulting.com INNOVATIONInternationalMediaConsulting-London www.innovation-mediaconsulting.com Design SpirosPolikandriotis Contributors PriscaAkhaya PetaAndersen RyanBoyden Marielys Cepeda DannyCheng CorneliusJ.David LilianneDeLaCalle TeaganRaeFardell GeoffreyGreen LarissaGreen KyleHardy LauraImkamp ShendiKatro CarlosKoteich MaryColetteMasteller JenniferMatthews ShannonS.May DevonOtt KristieReilly TimRyan ShaunaSasso NicoleTroelstrup EluzVilchez KorshaWilson LilyYuhas Cover DeborahWithey Marketing, sales and finance MartaTorres Advertising StuartHands Stuart@fipp.com Publishers ChrisLlewellyn HelenBland FIPP-theworldwidemagazinemediaassociation www.fipp.com chris@fipp.com helen@fipp.com InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  19. 19. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport digital may be, will be, could be... ...digital is Thursday, 5 June 14
  20. 20. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport MOBILE MOMENT Thursday, 5 June 14
  21. 21. InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2013WorldReport INNOVATION Thursday, 5 June 14
  22. 22. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  23. 23. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Mobile major milestones in ’13: Thursday, 5 June 14
  24. 24. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Mobile major milestones in ’13: Thursday, 5 June 14
  25. 25. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Mobile major milestones in ’13: • 1 billion smartphones sold Thursday, 5 June 14
  26. 26. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Mobile major milestones in ’13: • 1 billion smartphones sold • Global tablet sales up 50% Thursday, 5 June 14
  27. 27. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Mobile major milestones in ’13: • 1 billion smartphones sold • Global tablet sales up 50% • Mobile sales passed PC sales for first time Thursday, 5 June 14
  28. 28. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  29. 29. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport By 2017: Smartphones will hit 1.8 bn or 82% of mobile sales Thursday, 5 June 14
  30. 30. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  31. 31. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport More mobile projections: Thursday, 5 June 14
  32. 32. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport More mobile projections: • Tablet ownership will quadruple by 2017 Thursday, 5 June 14
  33. 33. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport More mobile projections: • Tablet ownership will quadruple by 2017 • Tablet ownership will be 55% in ’17 v. 7% in ’11 Thursday, 5 June 14
  34. 34. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport More mobile projections: • Tablet ownership will quadruple by 2017 • Tablet ownership will be 55% in ’17 v. 7% in ’11 • China: 9 of 10 phones sold are smartphones Thursday, 5 June 14
  35. 35. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport More mobile projections: • Tablet ownership will quadruple by 2017 • Tablet ownership will be 55% in ’17 v. 7% in ’11 • China: 9 of 10 phones sold are smartphones • Southeast Asia: Tablet sales double ’12 to ’13 Thursday, 5 June 14
  36. 36. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport More mobile projections: • Tablet ownership will quadruple by 2017 • Tablet ownership will be 55% in ’17 v. 7% in ’11 • China: 9 of 10 phones sold are smartphones • Southeast Asia: Tablet sales double ’12 to ’13 • Africa: Smartphone ownership 2X by 2017 Thursday, 5 June 14
  37. 37. We have seen the future, and it looks like mobile Smartphone and tablet ownership is skyrocketing; some magazines are getting 30-50 per cent of their traffic now from mobile Laura Imkamp 2017 world 1.8B smartphonesales 82% oftotalmobile phonessold of adults own a smartphone adults own a tablet 60% 40% US mobile phones smartphones 6.8B 90% of adults own a smartphone 55% Europe Big Five smartphones units sold in 2013, representing sales of 2013 an increase of 11% over 2012 230M 2017 tablet owners 55% $120B Western Europe China smartphone growth smartphone users smartphone users 19% 100M 200M Africa 20182013 Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities t is late 2013. A motley crew of passengers is boarding a small commuter plane at a modest airport in Nova Scotia, Canada. One of those passengers is a good-natured gentleman with a mammoth, indeed infamous beard that alone has attracted 465 Twitter fol- lowers. That same bearded gentleman is also a new media pioneer, notorious in Silicon Valley and Silicon Alley alike for taking and winning big bets on digital innovations. He’s very pleased this morning. As he sur- veys the passengers around him, hhe sees that, other than the man sitting next to him reading an old-fashioned newspaper, everyone else is reading a tablet. That makes Jim Dalrymple very happy. “I love the fact that even users are coming around,” he said. “It’s time for the publishers to come around as well.” It’s been roughly three and a half years since the launch of the iPad - six and a half years after the first iPhone came out - and we are in or fast approaching the “Golden Age of Mobile,” according to mobile industry consultant and author Chetan Sharma. “We are entering the ‘Connected Intelli- gence’ era,” Sharma wrote last summer. “These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up. Welcome to the Golden Age of Mobile.” Sharma’s words come at a time when the dramatic changes and uncertainty of the last decade in the publishing industry are begin- ning to gel into a vision of the future that has “mobile” front and centre. Globally, the smartphone market passed a major milestone in 2013, with 1bn devices sold during the year, according to the research company International Data Corp (IDC). Global tablet sales surged 50 per cent in 2013 and mo- bile sales surpassed PC sales for the first time, at the end of 2013, according to IDC. By 2017, smartphone sales will hit 1.8 billion representing 82 per cent of total mobile phones sold, according to Smartphone Quarterly. Nearly two thirds of US adults own a smart- phone, and roughly 40 per cent have a tablet, according to 2013 research from the Pew Re- search Centre. In Europe, smartphones have a 55 per cent market share in Europe’s Big Five countries (Germany, UK, France, Italy, and Spain), according to comScore. In Western Europe, shipments of tablets and smartphones ex- ceeded 230 million units in 2013 and revenues approached $120 billion — an increase of 11 per cent compared with 2012, according to I Sources:SmartPhoneQuarterly,PewResearchCentre,comScore,IDC,ChinaTelecommunicationsSectorandTheGuardian, InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14
  38. 38. In terms of scale — if noth- ing else — China’s mobile market is a world apart. While the US market added an impressive 55 million new smartphones in 2013, China added a mind- boggling 150 million new devices. The China Internet Network Information Cen- tre reported that 464 million Chinese accessed the internet via smartphones or other mobile device. China is also the largest online video consumption market, according to Nielsen. Put those statistics togeth- er, and you have a fertile market for mobile content and advertising. “In China, because of the robustness of the video sector, it does render a dif- ferent kind of consumption, where people are more familiar and OK with having sound, video effects, and the whole story being told in a [visual] way,” said Hearst Magazines International director of digital media Jenny Tsai. And that’s why publishers in China like Hearst and Condé Nast are seeing huge success rates in video add-ons to digital magazine content, especially in the Mobile magazines in the world’s largest mobile market: China continues page xx IDC. The future is even brighter, with analyst Forrester projecting a quadrupling of tablet ownership by 2017. The firm predicts the per- centage of online adults owning a tablet will hit 55 per cent by 2017, after being a mere seven per cent in 2011. In China (the world’s largest mobile market with 6.8bn mobile phones, according to the Telecommunications Development Sector), nine out of ten cellular phones sold are smart- phones, according to The Guardian. Tablets are the most preferred device for leisure and entertainment activities in China, according to the 2013 Research on the Media Value and Advertising Effect of Tablets. In Southeast Asia, tablet sales doubled in volume from June 2012 to May 2013 compared to the year before, according to a report by research firm GfK Asia. Even in Africa, where smartphone pene- tration lags the rest of the world, smartphone ownership is growing at 19 per cent year over year, according to IDC. Of the 650 million mobile phone subscribers in Africa, there are already about 100 million smartphone users, and that number is projected to double over the next four years, according to IDC. The increasing penetration of smartphones and tablets is already having an impact on magazines, with some publishers seeing huge jumps in mobile traffic. In the US, The Atlantic and Forbes, for ex- ample, are getting 30 to 50 per cent of their traffic from mobile respectively. In 2011, 86 per cent of Condé Nast UK’s traf- fic came from PCs, with less than one per cent via tablet and 14 per cent from mobile. Barely two years later, desktop traffic had plummeted to 58 per cent of the total, while mobile had more than doubled to 30 per cent and tablets shot from one to 12 per cent. Hearst UK titles Elle and Company have launched new mobile products in response to a 70 per cent increase in mobile traffic, with Elle getting 30 per cent of its traffic from mobile and Company almost half (45 per cent). “The proliferation of content consumption via mobile devices is forcing the industry to re- think how we package content, how we build websites, and, ultimately, how we monetise those via advertising,” said Kim Lau, VP/digital manager of The Atlantic Digital. “That’s a very real portion of our audience and one that we’re increasingly focused on making sure that we’re providing content to in a way that is optimised for their devices,” said Lau. And yet, even though it’s increasingly obvi- ous that mobile will be the dominant platform of the future, getting there is still proving to be a bit problematic. Why? Despite the growth of tablet ownership, tablet magazine subscriptions still accounted for no more than 3 per cent of total magazine circulation in the first half of 2013, according to the Alliance for Audited Media. “Everybody thought [the iPad] overnight was going to be this great thing to solve [ev- eryone’s] worries,” said Forbes Media chief product officer Lewis DVorkin. “But overnight? That’s not the case.” The battle for a mobile user’s time is an in- herent problem with mobile devices. Mobile users have so many options. Gaming, apps, and social networking, in particular, are sucking up more and more of mobile users’ attention spans. Already, about 65 per cent of time spent on social networks is happening via mobile devices, according to ComScore. And that’s something publishers need to tackle head-on. “We continue to have to fight for our place of time spent,” said Hearst’s App Lab vice pres- ident of digital editions Chris Wilkes. “Perhaps that more than anything else is what’s going to determine if we’re successful long term or not.” Another reason for the slower than expected success of mobile magazines is the advertis- ers — mostly in the Western hemisphere. They are the sea anchors, indicating that they still need a bit more convincing before they’ll start throwing money at digital publications. “[The advertisers] are more worried about giving the user content in the form that it is in a magazine than they are in delivering a good experience for the user in iOS,” Dalrymple explained. “I think the priorities are wrong.” Advertisers are not risk-takers, said Henk “The proliferation of content consumption via mobile devices is forcing the industry to rethink how we package content.” Kim Lau VP/digital, The Atlantic Digital InnovationsinMagazinesMedia2014WorldReport Thursday, 5 June 14

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