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Eight Verses for Training the Mind <ul><li>By Kadampa Geshe Langritangpa </li></ul><ul><li>Talk Two </li></ul>
Buddha’s compassion <ul><ul><li>is more in relationship to spiritual potential </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>simile of the lo...
Lotus Pool
The Lotus
extraordinary potential <ul><ul><li>he sees extraordinary potential all around him </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>this causes ...
Verse 2 <ul><ul><li>Whenever I am in the company of others, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May I regard myself as inferior to ...
Atma-mana <ul><ul><li>think we are special even when we believe we  are bad or flawed  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>we might...
A strong practice <ul><li>accept our pride, but need to expand out  </li></ul><ul><li>i.e. not try to eradicate all our pr...
Another approach <ul><li>regard everyone we meet as worthy of being  served by us  </li></ul><ul><li>everyone is equally w...
Difficult for Indian Buddhists? <ul><li>particularly difficult for Indian buddhists  </li></ul><ul><li>caste system has th...
Issues of self-worth <ul><li>in West ‘ i nferior’   probably not very  helpful word  </li></ul><ul><li>but can ’t  get awa...
“ Everything that lives is holy”  <ul><li>Quote by William Blake </li></ul><ul><li>for us this verse could be more a case ...
Counter-acting pride and conceit <ul><li>Buddha taught the  Tathagatagarbha   doctrine </li></ul><ul><li>every living thin...
We are so dependent on others <ul><li>might help to make list of all who have  helped us </li></ul><ul><li>Tibetan Buddhis...
Verse 3 <ul><li>In all my actions may I watch my mind, </li></ul><ul><li>And as soon as disturbing emotions arise, </li></...
‘ d isturbing emotions ’ <ul><li>first two verses give a positive vision of  cherishing others </li></ul><ul><li>they unde...
Klesas <ul><li>the root meaning of  klesa :  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>something that afflicts, disturbs, creates turbulence, ...
‘ an internal rebellion’ <ul><li>as we start to cherish others  </li></ul><ul><li>we start to stir things up </li></ul><ul...
Just stop them! <ul><li>Langritangpa’s advice </li></ul><ul><li>simply stop them  -  just like that!  </li></ul><ul><li>fo...
Some  klesas  worse than others <ul><li>some  klesas  more serious than others </li></ul><ul><li>in the Mahayana the most ...
Why is hatred so serious? <ul><li>it cuts you off from the bodhicitta </li></ul><ul><li>you disrupt your connection to oth...
Refinement and difficulties <ul><li>As we practice we get more refined, more  sensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Danger then is w...
With difficulties we can really practise <ul><li>Hakuin very critical of some types of meditation  </li></ul><ul><li>what ...
Conclusion <ul><ul><li>Whenever I am in the company of others, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May I regard myself as inferior ...
Be a Lotus
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Eight Verses for Training the Mind: the Bodhisattva Ideal and the Bodhicitta – Talk 2

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Given by Sona at Manchester Buddhist Centre on 7th October 2006

Published in: Spiritual, Education
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Eight Verses for Training the Mind: the Bodhisattva Ideal and the Bodhicitta – Talk 2

  1. 1. Eight Verses for Training the Mind <ul><li>By Kadampa Geshe Langritangpa </li></ul><ul><li>Talk Two </li></ul>
  2. 2. Buddha’s compassion <ul><ul><li>is more in relationship to spiritual potential </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>simile of the lotuses growing up in muddy water </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>beings in various stages of development </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Lotus Pool
  4. 4. The Lotus
  5. 5. extraordinary potential <ul><ul><li>he sees extraordinary potential all around him </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>this causes him to feel compassion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>anukampa – ‘to shake, tremble with’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the removal of suffering is a kind of by-product </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Verse 2 <ul><ul><li>Whenever I am in the company of others, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May I regard myself as inferior to all, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And from the depths of my heart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cherish others as supreme. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Atma-mana <ul><ul><li>think we are special even when we believe we are bad or flawed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>we might notice this when we feel affronted </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. when others seem to think they are better than us </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>so here we think ‘let them go first’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>they provide us with an opportunity to practice self-transcendence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>provides opportunity to overcome our pride </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. A strong practice <ul><li>accept our pride, but need to expand out </li></ul><ul><li>i.e. not try to eradicate all our pride </li></ul><ul><li>it is part of spiritual growth, the evolution of the individual </li></ul><ul><li>needs to be refined, developed and in the end seen through </li></ul><ul><li>this is a practice to correct imbalance within ourselves </li></ul><ul><li>not easy to see ourselves as inferior </li></ul>
  9. 9. Another approach <ul><li>regard everyone we meet as worthy of being served by us </li></ul><ul><li>everyone is equally worthy of our kindness and attention </li></ul><ul><li>all beings are a field of care, ourselves included </li></ul>
  10. 10. Difficult for Indian Buddhists? <ul><li>particularly difficult for Indian buddhists </li></ul><ul><li>caste system has them as the lowest of the low </li></ul><ul><li>how do they understand this? </li></ul><ul><li>they found they could relate in terms of the ‘honoured guest’ who is treated like a king or god </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. treated with extraordinary grace and courtesy </li></ul>
  11. 11. Issues of self-worth <ul><li>in West ‘ i nferior’ probably not very helpful word </li></ul><ul><li>but can ’t get away from pride and conceit </li></ul><ul><li>in the West also have issues with poor self- view </li></ul><ul><li>it can be a form of arrogance </li></ul>
  12. 12. “ Everything that lives is holy” <ul><li>Quote by William Blake </li></ul><ul><li>for us this verse could be more a case of elevating others </li></ul><ul><li>seeing others as superior is spiritual, religious </li></ul><ul><li>seeing everyone as sacred, as holy </li></ul><ul><li>feel reverence, even humility to others </li></ul><ul><li>false humility is another form of ‘p ride’ </li></ul>
  13. 13. Counter-acting pride and conceit <ul><li>Buddha taught the Tathagatagarbha doctrine </li></ul><ul><li>every living thing has Buddha nature </li></ul><ul><li>so why are we so special, so unique? </li></ul><ul><li>gratitude to others counteracts atma-mana </li></ul><ul><li>we are not as independent as we think </li></ul>
  14. 14. We are so dependent on others <ul><li>might help to make list of all who have helped us </li></ul><ul><li>Tibetan Buddhists believe all beings have been your mother and father </li></ul><ul><li>without our parents, who gave us this life, this birth, we would not benefit now </li></ul><ul><li>serving others and the dharma - w ithout reward </li></ul><ul><li>Shantideva ‘ M ay I be a servant to beings’ </li></ul>
  15. 15. Verse 3 <ul><li>In all my actions may I watch my mind, </li></ul><ul><li>And as soon as disturbing emotions arise, </li></ul><ul><li>May I forcefully stop them at once, </li></ul><ul><li>Since they hurt both me and others. </li></ul>
  16. 16. ‘ d isturbing emotions ’ <ul><li>first two verses give a positive vision of cherishing others </li></ul><ul><li>they undermine the deep atma-klesas atma-sneya and atma-mana </li></ul><ul><li>but other klesas arise as you cherish others </li></ul><ul><li>here secondary klesas called ‘ d isturbing emotions ’ </li></ul><ul><li>these c an be experienced in meditation </li></ul><ul><li>sudden eruption of k lesa </li></ul>
  17. 17. Klesas <ul><li>the root meaning of klesa : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>something that afflicts, disturbs, creates turbulence, pain, suffering in the mind </li></ul></ul><ul><li>recognised by their disturbing influence on the mind </li></ul><ul><li>they stir things up; disintegrate, divide the mind </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ f orces of disintegration ’ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>k lesas are very unhelpful - damaging </li></ul><ul><li>obstruct maturing, and ripening you and others </li></ul>
  18. 18. ‘ an internal rebellion’ <ul><li>as we start to cherish others </li></ul><ul><li>we start to stir things up </li></ul><ul><li>klesas arise </li></ul><ul><li>often experience this in meditation - clear, bright mind, </li></ul><ul><li>then suddenly there are the klesas ! </li></ul><ul><li>it is like an internal rebellion </li></ul>In all my actions may I watch my mind, And as soon as disturbing emotions arise
  19. 19. Just stop them! <ul><li>Langritangpa’s advice </li></ul><ul><li>simply stop them - just like that! </li></ul><ul><li>forceful stopping - use your power </li></ul><ul><li>or loving attention - strong enough to just stop them or dissolves them </li></ul><ul><li>can we just stop the klesas ? </li></ul><ul><li>NO! </li></ul><ul><li>try and understand what lies behind them </li></ul><ul><li>forceful stopping may lead to repression/ suppression </li></ul>
  20. 20. Some klesas worse than others <ul><li>some klesas more serious than others </li></ul><ul><li>in the Mahayana the most serious is hatred </li></ul><ul><li>M.Y. sutra ‘ T he Definitive Vinaya ’ lists and classifies klesas . </li></ul><ul><li>craving is subtle and difficult to remove </li></ul><ul><li>but is not so serious - just leads to rebirth! </li></ul><ul><li>hatred is easy to remove, but very, very serious </li></ul>
  21. 21. Why is hatred so serious? <ul><li>it cuts you off from the bodhicitta </li></ul><ul><li>you disrupt your connection to others </li></ul><ul><li>but you cannot ignore craving of course </li></ul><ul><li>- it too can cause disruptions with others </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. taking someone ’s lover </li></ul><ul><li>ignorance is also serious - thinking we do good we often cause harm </li></ul><ul><li>all klesas have to be dealt with </li></ul>
  22. 22. Refinement and difficulties <ul><li>As we practice we get more refined, more sensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Danger then is we avoid any kind of difficulty </li></ul><ul><li>Practice can become a refined hedonism </li></ul><ul><li>Pseudo-spiritual-aestheticism (Bhante) </li></ul><ul><li>In the sense you become too precious about your mental states - protective. </li></ul>
  23. 23. With difficulties we can really practise <ul><li>Hakuin very critical of some types of meditation </li></ul><ul><li>what he called - ‘d ead sitting ’ </li></ul><ul><li>he said we should become like a lotus that blooms in the fire </li></ul><ul><li>practice your meditation in your life not just on your cushion </li></ul><ul><li>when confronted by difficulties we can really practice </li></ul>
  24. 24. Conclusion <ul><ul><li>Whenever I am in the company of others, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May I regard myself as inferior to all, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And from the depths of my heart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cherish others as supreme. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In all my actions may I watch my mind, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And as soon as disturbing emotions arise, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May I forcefully stop them at once, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Since they hurt both me and others. </li></ul></ul>
  25. 25. Be a Lotus

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