MEN & BOYS, WOMEN & CHILDREN, PAKISTAN 1979               CLARE BRETT SMITH
Photographer/Writer,Clare Brett Smith, onthe trail to Baltit Fort witha guide. Hunza 1979
Men & Boys Women & Children,Pakistan,1979             Portfolio and Travel Memoir               Clare Brett Smith         ...
Men & Boys, Women & Children, Pakistan 1979            Photographs and Text by Clare Brett Smith               Copyright ©...
Men & Boys, Women & Children, Pakistan 1979       Portfolio and Travel Memoir,1979              Clare Brett Smith         ...
MEN & BOYS, WOMEN & CHILDREN in PAKISTAN    I have always liked the idea of being as invisible as Cartier-Bresson, of bein...
As a middle-aged foreign lady, I could go almost anywhere. I could sit inthe front room with my husband and our hosts and ...
MEN & BOYS     Peshawar bus6
Rawalpindi Bazaar                    7
Metal Shop in the Hunza Bazaar8
Charpoy Vendors in Rawalpindi                                9
Gilgit10
Hunza        11
Guard at the Afghanistan-Pakistan border12
Checkpoint on the Karakoram Highway                                      13
Tailors stall in the Gilgit Bazaar   Shoe salesman in Rawalpindi14
Serving tea in the bazaar   Serving goats heads by the roadside                                                           ...
FASHION     In Gilgit, Hunza and throughout the Yasin Valley, men wear a     traditional coat of handwoven wool tweed call...
Fine Feathers in Gilgit                          17
A handsome lad, one of many18
Yasins own Omar Sharif                          19
"Patti "weaver at     his pit loom in     Hunza20
Tailor & hat maker in Gilgit                               21
In the Gilit Bazaar22
Playing a smalltin pipe in Gilgit                     23
Boys in Gilgit24
School for Boys, YasinThere were no schoolshere for girls in the late 70s.Now there are, through thework of the Aga Khansd...
WOMEN & CHILDREN      Pakistan Day Parade, Islamabad26
Bus Station, Peshawar   27
28   Shopping at the Rawalpindi Bazaar
In the fields, Taxila   29
The protective     miller,he and his     family produce flour     with a small set of     grindstones set into     a stream...
Daughters are cherished too.                               31
Gypsies are a race apart and not troubled by clothing regulations32
The wife of Yasins rajah, in thetypical head wrap of theregion.In the Northern Areas womenare not completely hidden butwea...
en route to Yasin34
Muna Khan, properly covered, arriving in Barkulti. Ahead, her father is welcomed.                                         ...
In the Womens        Quarters,Yasin     Its cold in the Yasin Valley,     even in summer, and     houses were often built ...
Home, partly underground, in Yasin   37
Young wives and newborn baby. The babys face has been treated with a paste of ground ibex horn to keep his skin from dryin...
Mother and son, Yasin                        39
Old woman with goiter40
Young woman spinning in Barkulti                                   41
Burge, my husband, with a bee-keeper     A bee-keepers netted head made obvious sense but only     intensified my aversion ...
AFZAL & SUNNY KHANWhen we met the Khans in Connecticut, they were refugees. Warned of anassassination attempt by the Bhutt...
The children were popular wherever they went public schools, after-school     jobs at places like Bonanza Steak House. Sun...
"Aunty", Surina and Puchi Khan in the living room, Islamabad                                                              ...
Sunny Khan at home in Islamabad   Afzal & Clare, roadside tea shop46          Muna Khan                  Puchi Khan & Abbo...
In Islamabad, Lady Vicky Noon & Afzal   In Swat, Prince Aurangzeb & his wife,                                        Nassi...
Chickens from Arbor Acres were known worldwide, and the breeding stock from Glastonbury, Connecticut was the basis of Afza...
House Servant                49
Grandson of the Wali of Swat, with pet goose50
We were guests in the home of Prince Aurangzeb in Swat.                                                          51
Orphan girls in Swat: Their future depends on belonging to a male-headed     family and the orphanage, a favorite charity ...
Aurangzebs lively daughter, shown here at home inSwat, would soon leave for an English University                         ...
Habib Ur Rahman, bearer for the Khans, an all-purpose job, a sort of major-domo54
Nazish Ata-Ullah in Lahore, family friend of the Khans. A member ofthe famous mountaineering family, she guided us on a di...
FOR ALL THE SERENITY IN THE COUNTRYSIDE, THERE WERE DISTURBING         SIGNS OF UNREST IN THE CITIES AND TOWNS ALONG THE R...
City Street, Movie Posters, in Mardan                                        57
Signs of unrest - Afghans fleeing to Pakistan and a Russian guard at the Khyber Pass Tanks in the Pakistan Day Parade and t...
Guns and Guards, a common sight in Peshawar                                              59
Said Ahmed Gailani, descended from an     Political Activist Zia Khan Nassry &Afghani saint, revered and supported by   Ga...
IT SEEMED LIKE A GOODTIME TO BE OUT OF TOWN.We were among the firsttourists to travel the newKarakoram Highway in April1979...
Robert Ross and Muna Khan   Heavy trucks are hard on the     in the substitute van       unstable roadbed of the new KKH62
The Indus River snakesthrough the forbidding rockslopes of the Karakoramsand the highway runsalongside it, stretching 800m...
Refugees from Afghanistan beside the highway? Or were     they tribal people for whom the Karakoram Highway was their     ...
TRAVELING BACK IN TIMEWe saw a lot of the country, a beautiful land, ancient and pastoral,with camels, water wheels, soldi...
66     Late Afternoon in Taxila
Tongas in Taxila   67
Taxila maize fields68
69 / PAKRooftopsAbbotabadPSD                               69
70     In Taxila
Irrigation system,Taxila   71
Riding out from the Tribal Lands72
FURTHER INTO THE MOUNTAINSWe had always wanted to see the great mountains, K2, Nanga Parbat andRakaposhi, but not to climb...
74   The Hunza Valley at spring planting time
Below the Baltit Fort in Hunza   75
76     Guarding the Yasin Valley
The Yasin Valley   77
In earlier times the chief of every     village was a Rajah, but not often     nowadays. This is the leader of     the vil...
79
Barkulti: Afzal Khan standing at the center with the men of his grandmothers tribe80
Waiting to be chosen, four young would-be brides. It had been rumored thatAfzal and Sunnys visit to Barkulti would include...
A SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY     Afzal, who, years earlier, had financed a boy from the village all the     way through medica...
Shukur at the Barkulti village meeting                                         83
Friendly greetings in the Gilgit Bazaar84
The chieftain stood under acolorful shamiana,apatchwork cloth usedthroughout Pakistan for anyceremony, from a weddingto th...
Libraries were comfortingly familiar and this one was full of English books     from the days of the Raj, as well as a set...
In the Yasin Valley. beside the Gilgit River, where the water waslow enough to see petroglyphs on the smooth boulders.    ...
I bought a basket from the maker in Hunza. Ive always liked and collected     useful baskets, although this one, of red os...
Here in the northern mountain valleys WE were the curiosities.                                                            ...
A woman tending sheep in the clouds above Hunza, a real "Lost Horizon"90
The Karakorams                 91
Burge, my companionin travel and life, walkingalong an irrigation ditchin Hunza, 1979
Men and Boys, Women and Children - Pakistan 1979
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Men and Boys, Women and Children - Pakistan 1979

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This book is a portfolio and a travel memoir. We visited and traveled with Pakistani family friends for a month in the Northwest Frontier Province and the Northern Territories, along the Indus River and in the Karakoram Mountain range. The photographs look as though they were taken two hundred years ago, not thirty years. Today it is one of the world’s most dangerous spots, bordering Afghanistan, it’s a tribal land and never, I think, very peaceful.

Hardcover, with jacket, 11” x 8.5”, 90 pages, 101 images, published 2010, $135 ppd. (ISBN: 978-1-4507-2293-3)

Published in: Art & Photos, Travel, Business
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  • Hello, I am Zafar from Barkulti, Gilgit, Pakistan, currently based in US. Something about my family has been published in this book. Please let me know how can I get a paper print of the book. Looking forward for your response. Zafar (zafar.hilbi@gmail.com)
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Men and Boys, Women and Children - Pakistan 1979

  1. 1. MEN & BOYS, WOMEN & CHILDREN, PAKISTAN 1979 CLARE BRETT SMITH
  2. 2. Photographer/Writer,Clare Brett Smith, onthe trail to Baltit Fort witha guide. Hunza 1979
  3. 3. Men & Boys Women & Children,Pakistan,1979 Portfolio and Travel Memoir Clare Brett Smith 1
  4. 4. Men & Boys, Women & Children, Pakistan 1979 Photographs and Text by Clare Brett Smith Copyright © Clare Brett Smith 2010 all rights reserved Library of Congress Catalogue # isbn 978-1-4507-2293-3 Many of these photographs were exhibited as The Northwest Frontier Province at The University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut in 1980; People of the Indus at Save the Children Gallery, Westport, Connecticut in 1980 and The Silver Bullet Gallery, Providence.Rhode Island in 1981 Clare Brett Smith 80 Mountain Spring Road Farmington,Connecticut United States of America2
  5. 5. Men & Boys, Women & Children, Pakistan 1979 Portfolio and Travel Memoir,1979 Clare Brett Smith 3
  6. 6. MEN & BOYS, WOMEN & CHILDREN in PAKISTAN I have always liked the idea of being as invisible as Cartier-Bresson, of being able to photograph as he did without intruding or changing anything. In northern Pakistan I was certainly visible but not really noticed. Muslim women stay at home, protected by their men, and if I were native-born, a begum sahib, I would have been at home too. But because I was a foreign woman, a mem-sahib, and permitted by the men in my family to roam the world, I was considered unimportant or unchaste — or both. To be so inconsequential is not good for ones pride, but its a real asset for taking pictures. Men posed easily for my camera, and boys were so eager I had to chase them out of my line of sight. The markets were full of men, buyers and sellers. Men were the secretaries and even the house servants were men. I saw almost no women out in public in the NorthWest Frontier Province or the Northern Areas, and the few I saw were shrouded in bourkhas. Most of the women I photographed were in their homes and were women to whom I had been properly introduced.4
  7. 7. As a middle-aged foreign lady, I could go almost anywhere. I could sit inthe front room with my husband and our hosts and visit the womensquarters too, something my husband could not do. I could have teabeside the road, talk with the border guards, even walk through the fieldsalone. Classified somewhere between gypsies and 19th CenturyEnglish ladies, I was exempt from the dress code. I could never havemanaged my cameras under a bourkha.Walking by myself along the river in Swat, I quickly realized that myfreedom was not really a privilege. A woman alone is unprotected andoutside society. No one smiled at me, not even the children, andwomen, bent over tending their lentils, chillies and opium poppies,scarcely looked up. Old men glared and young men jostled me. I wasglad I could not understand what they said. I understood the tone all toowell. It was a different world when, the next afternoon, my husband and Istrolled together along the same riverside path. People came out fromtheir doorways and stood up from their gardens to wave. They offeredchai and we heard their softly murmured, Salaam Aleikums, theirtraditional peaceful and respectful Muslim greetings. Clare Brett Smith, February 2010 5
  8. 8. MEN & BOYS Peshawar bus6
  9. 9. Rawalpindi Bazaar 7
  10. 10. Metal Shop in the Hunza Bazaar8
  11. 11. Charpoy Vendors in Rawalpindi 9
  12. 12. Gilgit10
  13. 13. Hunza 11
  14. 14. Guard at the Afghanistan-Pakistan border12
  15. 15. Checkpoint on the Karakoram Highway 13
  16. 16. Tailors stall in the Gilgit Bazaar Shoe salesman in Rawalpindi14
  17. 17. Serving tea in the bazaar Serving goats heads by the roadside 15
  18. 18. FASHION In Gilgit, Hunza and throughout the Yasin Valley, men wear a traditional coat of handwoven wool tweed called "Patti", often embroidered with flowers, as if to decorate the exceptionally handsome men of the region. Sleeves are far longer than needed, so they are thrown over the shoulder Sinatra-style. The characteristic rolled brim hats became famous on American TV when CBS anchor, Dan Rather, wore one after his visit to the Mujahadeen in Afghanistan during the Russian invasion. Other hat styles, in the Gilgit and Hunza markets, identify traders from nearby Afghanistan, China and Tajikstan. The similarity between the round hats and the round stone of the walls and buildings is striking. Henna Dye16
  19. 19. Fine Feathers in Gilgit 17
  20. 20. A handsome lad, one of many18
  21. 21. Yasins own Omar Sharif 19
  22. 22. "Patti "weaver at his pit loom in Hunza20
  23. 23. Tailor & hat maker in Gilgit 21
  24. 24. In the Gilit Bazaar22
  25. 25. Playing a smalltin pipe in Gilgit 23
  26. 26. Boys in Gilgit24
  27. 27. School for Boys, YasinThere were no schoolshere for girls in the late 70s.Now there are, through thework of the Aga Khansdevelopment foundationand Greg Mortensonsconstruction of schools,described in his book,THREE CUPS OF TEA. 25
  28. 28. WOMEN & CHILDREN Pakistan Day Parade, Islamabad26
  29. 29. Bus Station, Peshawar 27
  30. 30. 28 Shopping at the Rawalpindi Bazaar
  31. 31. In the fields, Taxila 29
  32. 32. The protective miller,he and his family produce flour with a small set of grindstones set into a stream that runs into the Gilgit River.30
  33. 33. Daughters are cherished too. 31
  34. 34. Gypsies are a race apart and not troubled by clothing regulations32
  35. 35. The wife of Yasins rajah, in thetypical head wrap of theregion.In the Northern Areas womenare not completely hidden butwear shawls, or chadors,often draped over high stiffbrocade hats. 33
  36. 36. en route to Yasin34
  37. 37. Muna Khan, properly covered, arriving in Barkulti. Ahead, her father is welcomed. 35
  38. 38. In the Womens Quarters,Yasin Its cold in the Yasin Valley, even in summer, and houses were often built into the hillside.Light streams down through a square in the timbered roof onto the central cooking area, and low beds circle the hearth.36
  39. 39. Home, partly underground, in Yasin 37
  40. 40. Young wives and newborn baby. The babys face has been treated with a paste of ground ibex horn to keep his skin from drying out in the high thin air.38
  41. 41. Mother and son, Yasin 39
  42. 42. Old woman with goiter40
  43. 43. Young woman spinning in Barkulti 41
  44. 44. Burge, my husband, with a bee-keeper A bee-keepers netted head made obvious sense but only intensified my aversion to the encumbering and stifling head covering required of women in many Muslim countries.42
  45. 45. AFZAL & SUNNY KHANWhen we met the Khans in Connecticut, they were refugees. Warned of anassassination attempt by the Bhutto government, and black-listed inPakistan, in1972 they fled their many houses, flourishing enterprises, friendsand relatives. Staying briefy in Kabul, Teheran, Spain and finally, through theirassociation with Arbor Acres, they and their six children settled here. Wehad no idea of their former life, a life of servants and rose gardens. They hadbeen socially prominent and renowned for military service and highgovernment positions. We only knew them as recent arrivals from Pakistanand we admired how adaptable and optimistic they were. Sunny & Afzal at the Rakaposhi Hotel in Hunza 43
  46. 46. The children were popular wherever they went public schools, after-school jobs at places like Bonanza Steak House. Sunny & Afzals sociability, hospitality and entrepreneurial natures made them popular too. We liked them immediately. Running their poultry businesses in Pakistan from here, but unable to get money out of Pakistan, they shipped pottery and textiles to our small craft import business, cleverly turning crafts into a few dollars. Eventually their fortunes turned and, when they returned to Pakistan,they encouraged us to visit. This is the story, part of it at any rate, of that visit. Sunny & Afzal are both dead now, but they had read the journal I was keeping at the time and would not be surprised. I hope they would be pleased. Thirty years ago the vast difference in the roles of men and women in Pakistan was what I noticed most, and the photographs in the first part of this book make that obvious. I was amazed that educated and sophisticated women, like Sunny Khan and her daughters, were able to live so easily in such contrasting worlds. Free as only an American woman can be, I wonder if I could have made that kind of transition with such grace.44
  47. 47. "Aunty", Surina and Puchi Khan in the living room, Islamabad 45
  48. 48. Sunny Khan at home in Islamabad Afzal & Clare, roadside tea shop46 Muna Khan Puchi Khan & Abbottabad caretaker
  49. 49. In Islamabad, Lady Vicky Noon & Afzal In Swat, Prince Aurangzeb & his wife, Nassim, and their two daughters, Fakri A well-known philanthropist, she was and Ashatthe widow of the statesman, Sir FirazKhan. Like the heroines of M.M.Kayes Aurangzeb is the son and heir of theFAR PAVILIONS, she had her share of then-reigning Wali of Swat, a title datingadventure, during Partition when she back to the days of the Raj. Only anescaped from her burning home and advisory role. its still a prestigous one.hid with Hindu friends. 47
  50. 50. Chickens from Arbor Acres were known worldwide, and the breeding stock from Glastonbury, Connecticut was the basis of Afzal Khans ever- expanding chicken business in Pakistan. His farm had a distinctly military air about it, no "little red hen" atmosphere at all.48
  51. 51. House Servant 49
  52. 52. Grandson of the Wali of Swat, with pet goose50
  53. 53. We were guests in the home of Prince Aurangzeb in Swat. 51
  54. 54. Orphan girls in Swat: Their future depends on belonging to a male-headed family and the orphanage, a favorite charity of Nassim, daughter-in-law of the52 Wali, would help to arrange suitable marriages.
  55. 55. Aurangzebs lively daughter, shown here at home inSwat, would soon leave for an English University 53
  56. 56. Habib Ur Rahman, bearer for the Khans, an all-purpose job, a sort of major-domo54
  57. 57. Nazish Ata-Ullah in Lahore, family friend of the Khans. A member ofthe famous mountaineering family, she guided us on a different sort ofexpedition, buying a carpet for our Connecticut living room. 55
  58. 58. FOR ALL THE SERENITY IN THE COUNTRYSIDE, THERE WERE DISTURBING SIGNS OF UNREST IN THE CITIES AND TOWNS ALONG THE ROAD 1979 was a tense time in Pakistan, as now. General Zia was President and, former Prime Minister Bhutto, father of the late Benazir Bhutto, was imprisoned, some thought unjustly, and was hanged during our stay. We noticed a surveillance car that followed Afzal everywhere. We noticed black ribbons flying on the trucks, said to be in mourning for Bhutto. At the Afghanistan border we saw Russian soldiers, eight months before the actual Russian invasion, and we were offered guns, drugs, dollars and counterfeit dollars (only slightly cheaper) in the Lodi Kotal bazaar. We saw the stone bunkrooms and kitchen gardens built by Chinese workers, when they built the Karakoram Highway that opened the road to China. We heard mortar fire in the valley west of us, but were told it was only dynamite in the ruby mines. We met a political activist (Afghan but New York based) who, disappointed that we were not with the New York Times, invited us anyway to an uprising in support of the mujahadeen against the communist-led Afghan government (the same mujahadeen who later became the Taliban). Rumors sped via servants and drivers, but reliable news only came from the twice-daily BBC broadcasts. It was, and still is, hard to know the truth of anything.56
  59. 59. City Street, Movie Posters, in Mardan 57
  60. 60. Signs of unrest - Afghans fleeing to Pakistan and a Russian guard at the Khyber Pass Tanks in the Pakistan Day Parade and trucks from the north flying black pennants58
  61. 61. Guns and Guards, a common sight in Peshawar 59
  62. 62. Said Ahmed Gailani, descended from an Political Activist Zia Khan Nassry &Afghani saint, revered and supported by Gailani: Nassry had suggested we visitworshippers at his ancestors shrine, the scheduled March 28th uprising..waited in Peshawar for trustworthy news He had also been arranging shipmentsfrom the BBC of grain into Afghanistan.Then, as now, the need was great. Only the soldiers are different.60
  63. 63. IT SEEMED LIKE A GOODTIME TO BE OUT OF TOWN.We were among the firsttourists to travel the newKarakoram Highway in April1979 and, at one point, ourcar could not get over therockslide. We climbed overand rented a van on the otherside.We were always able to findplaces to stay as the Britishsystem of guest-houses stillexisted, usually about 12miles apart, a days ride byhorseback. 61
  64. 64. Robert Ross and Muna Khan Heavy trucks are hard on the in the substitute van unstable roadbed of the new KKH62
  65. 65. The Indus River snakesthrough the forbidding rockslopes of the Karakoramsand the highway runsalongside it, stretching 800miles from Islamabad,Pakistans capital, to theChinese border, throughgreat mountain ranges, theKarakorams and the HinduKush.Hundreds of workers,Pakistani and Chinese, diedduring the construction of theKKH, most of them killed bycrashing boulders. The rockis unstable, and engineersexpected landslides for thirtymore years. 63
  66. 66. Refugees from Afghanistan beside the highway? Or were they tribal people for whom the Karakoram Highway was their first outside contact, and a chance for medical help out in the world? With no common language, we could not tell.64
  67. 67. TRAVELING BACK IN TIMEWe saw a lot of the country, a beautiful land, ancient and pastoral,with camels, water wheels, soldiers and shepherds. Historysurrounded us as I was reading THE MEMOIRS OF THEEMPEROR BABUR, the Mughal conqueror (1425-1530), and UPTHE COUNTRY, the letters of Lady Emily Eden (1797-1869),sister of Lord Auckland, the Governor General of India — anunusual pair of guidebooks!We saw the gentle farmlands near Taxila, where archaeologistshave found hundreds of sites and relics from the great Buddhistkingdom of Gandhara. We stayed in Swat with the family of theWali of Swat, then a serene and lovely place. It has been sad tohear it described now as a Taliban battlefield. But most of our timewas concentrated among the northern mountains and valleys ofthe upper Indus River. 65
  68. 68. 66 Late Afternoon in Taxila
  69. 69. Tongas in Taxila 67
  70. 70. Taxila maize fields68
  71. 71. 69 / PAKRooftopsAbbotabadPSD 69
  72. 72. 70 In Taxila
  73. 73. Irrigation system,Taxila 71
  74. 74. Riding out from the Tribal Lands72
  75. 75. FURTHER INTO THE MOUNTAINSWe had always wanted to see the great mountains, K2, Nanga Parbat andRakaposhi, but not to climb them! They are far too difficult for us, or for anyoneexcept experienced mountaineers, but to see their peaks and snowfields, somany thousands of feet above us and the orchards so far below, made thestrenuous journey up the KKH exhilarating.We stayed in Gilgit, the main town of Gilgit-Baldistan (formerly called theNorthern Areas) and in Hunza, the model, so they say, for Shangri-La, aparadise imagined byJames Hilton in his popular 1933 novel, LOSTHORIZON, and famous, too, for the longevity of its people.Our destination was beyond Hunza, higher and westward, toward the pass ofBaroghil, into the Yasin Valley. That was literally the high point for me, about12,000 feet, where I was dazed by altitude and dazzled by the extraordinary-good looks of the people. The remote village of Barkulti was the ancestralvillage of Afzals grandmother, Aysha, from which she had been abducted byhis grandfather, Sirdar Samad Khan, many years before. 73
  76. 76. 74 The Hunza Valley at spring planting time
  77. 77. Below the Baltit Fort in Hunza 75
  78. 78. 76 Guarding the Yasin Valley
  79. 79. The Yasin Valley 77
  80. 80. In earlier times the chief of every village was a Rajah, but not often nowadays. This is the leader of the village of Yasin. Opposite page he greets Afzal Khan: Someone had been dispatched from our hotel in Hunza to alert the villages of Yasin and Barkulti that Afzal,his wife and a daughter would make another formal vist. Afzal had last visited seventeen years earlier. I was fortunate that there was just enough room in the jeep for me.78
  81. 81. 79
  82. 82. Barkulti: Afzal Khan standing at the center with the men of his grandmothers tribe80
  83. 83. Waiting to be chosen, four young would-be brides. It had been rumored thatAfzal and Sunnys visit to Barkulti would include selecting a bride for their eldestson. There was also hope that they would finance a new dam for the river. 81
  84. 84. A SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY Afzal, who, years earlier, had financed a boy from the village all the way through medical school, offered Shukur (center) a chance to come with us to Abbottabad and further his education and prospects. The teacher (center without hat) said he was the best student. We swept him up but, on the road home, Shukur became uncontrollably carsick. Afzal dropped him off beside the road immediately, but assured me that people would help the boy, and that he would make his way, in a week or so, to Abbottabad for the promised education. And so he did. I wondered how this sudden upheaval would affect him, and, I heard later, that he had not adjusted well. He did not understand his place, either with the family, or with the servants, and had been sent home.82
  85. 85. Shukur at the Barkulti village meeting 83
  86. 86. Friendly greetings in the Gilgit Bazaar84
  87. 87. The chieftain stood under acolorful shamiana,apatchwork cloth usedthroughout Pakistan for anyceremony, from a weddingto the opening of a newtelephone relay center. Theone to the right celebrateda polo match in Gilgit andthe one below identifies acarpet center in Lahore. 85
  88. 88. Libraries were comfortingly familiar and this one was full of English books from the days of the Raj, as well as a set of Tarzan books. Ibex horns, on a housetop, mythical beasts to us, were ordinary trophies here.86
  89. 89. In the Yasin Valley. beside the Gilgit River, where the water waslow enough to see petroglyphs on the smooth boulders. 87
  90. 90. I bought a basket from the maker in Hunza. Ive always liked and collected useful baskets, although this one, of red osier, was too heavy and eventually I had to leave it behind.88
  91. 91. Here in the northern mountain valleys WE were the curiosities. 89
  92. 92. A woman tending sheep in the clouds above Hunza, a real "Lost Horizon"90
  93. 93. The Karakorams 91
  94. 94. Burge, my companionin travel and life, walkingalong an irrigation ditchin Hunza, 1979

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