PĪ`ĀPĀ: The Hawaiian Alphabet  HAW 101
<ul><li>There are 5 vowels and 8 consonants in the pī`āpā </li></ul><ul><li>Nā Woela (vowels) </li></ul><ul><li>A E I O U ...
<ul><li>Nā Konoseta/Leokanipū Lāhui  ʻ Ē </li></ul><ul><li>B C D F G J Q </li></ul><ul><li>  Be  Ce De Fa Ga Iota Kopa </l...
ʻ OKINA <ul><li>The  ʻ okina is a glottal stop. In other words, the  ʻ okina cuts or separates vowel sounds. </li></ul><ul...
ʻ OKINA <ul><li>Value the  ʻ okina like you would value any other letter of the pī ʻ āpā </li></ul><ul><li>Note that some ...
KAHAKŌ <ul><li>The kahakō (-) elongates the vowel over which it is placed </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to the difference in th...
IMPORTANCE OF  ʻ OKINA AND KAHAKŌ <ul><li>Omission or unnecessary inclusion of  ʻ okina and/or kahakō can drastically chan...
SPELLING OUT WORDS ORALLY IN HAWAIIAN <ul><li>He  Ke  La  Mu  Nu  Pi  We  ʻ Okina </li></ul><ul><li>A E I O U </li></ul><u...
SPELLING OUT WORDS ORALLY IN HAWAIIAN <ul><li>He  Ke  La  Mu  Nu  Pi  We  ʻ Okina </li></ul><ul><li>A E I O U </li></ul><u...
SPELLING OUT NON-HAWAIIAN WORDS ORALLY IN HAWAIIAN <ul><li>B C D F G J Q </li></ul><ul><li>  Be  Ce De Fa Ga Iota Kopa </l...
FOUR SPELLING RULES <ul><li>Every word must have at least 1 vowel. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>kml p ʻw hnl </li></ul></ul><ul><...
Any questions? Please go to the thread on the Discussion Board that was created for this particular assignment and ask the...
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Piapa

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  • On slide 3, you have names for what are variously known as the foriegn/Bible/introduced letters, but different lists I have seen have different names for some of the letters. B, C, D, and T all seem consistent (except theat the others show kahakō on the vowels in the names) but the others vary:
    http://www.hawaiian.saivus.org/hawaiianlesson01.html has fē, gē, sō, and yī instead of your fa, ga, sa, and ieta, respectively; in addition, that website has no mention of C, J, Q, X, or Z.
    http://www.ahapunanaleo.org/index.php?/resources/ has fē and wī instead of your fa and vi, respectively.
    Which is really considered most correct currently, or is it like English where Z has two different names, zee in the USA and zed in the UK?
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  • On slide 2 each consonant is listed as a letter with what appears to be a name or pronunciation below it. For the vowels, only the letter is given.
    I am just starting to learn Hawaiian and see many resources, some of which state different things, and I am unsure which to believe. In this situation, I have seen several websites that spell out the name of each vowel as being preceded by an ‘okina and the vowel itself has a kahakō, so that the names of the vowels are in fact ‘Ā, ‘Ē, ‘Ī, ‘Ō, ‘Ū. Similarly, the vowels in each of the consonant names except ‘okina should have a kahakō: Hē, Kē, Lā, Mū, Nū, Pī, Wē. When I have heard words spelled in Internet audio files or videos, it does indeed sound as if each vowel letter is being preceded by the ‘okina and all the vowel sounds are lengthened except in ‘okina.
    My question is which is indeed correct for the spelling of the letters--as in youre slide 2 or as I mentioned in the previous paragraph?
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Piapa

  1. 1. PĪ`ĀPĀ: The Hawaiian Alphabet HAW 101
  2. 2. <ul><li>There are 5 vowels and 8 consonants in the pī`āpā </li></ul><ul><li>Nā Woela (vowels) </li></ul><ul><li>A E I O U </li></ul><ul><li>Nā Konoseta/Leokanipū (consonants) </li></ul><ul><li>H K L M N P W ʻ </li></ul><ul><li>He Ke La Mu Nu Pi We ʻ Okina </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Nā Konoseta/Leokanipū Lāhui ʻ Ē </li></ul><ul><li>B C D F G J Q </li></ul><ul><li> Be Ce De Fa Ga Iota Kopa </li></ul><ul><li>R S T V X Y Z </li></ul><ul><li>Ro Sa Ti Vi Kesa Ieta Zeta </li></ul>
  4. 4. ʻ OKINA <ul><li>The ʻ okina is a glottal stop. In other words, the ʻ okina cuts or separates vowel sounds. </li></ul><ul><li>ʻ is the appropriate mark for the ʻ okina (looks like an open-ended quote). ’ (an apostrophe) is not acceptable as it serves a different function. </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to the difference in the following pairs of words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>hao ha ʻ o </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>koe ko ʻ e </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>kou ko ʻ u </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>mai ma ʻ i </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. ʻ OKINA <ul><li>Value the ʻ okina like you would value any other letter of the pī ʻ āpā </li></ul><ul><li>Note that some speakers may place ʻ okina where they aren’t </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ie: kēia (this) ke ʻ ia kē ʻ ia </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. KAHAKŌ <ul><li>The kahakō (-) elongates the vowel over which it is placed </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to the difference in the following pairs of words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>uliuli ʻ ulī ʻ ulī </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>maka māka </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>kala kālā </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Function and intent are different: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Haaloa vs. Hāloa </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ʻ oopuu vs. ʻ ōpū </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. IMPORTANCE OF ʻ OKINA AND KAHAKŌ <ul><li>Omission or unnecessary inclusion of ʻ okina and/or kahakō can drastically change the meaning of a word as in the following examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>pau completed; done; finished </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>pa ʻ u soot </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>pa ʻ ū moist, damp </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>pā ʻ ū skirt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>kala a type of fish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>kālā money </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ka lā the sun </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. SPELLING OUT WORDS ORALLY IN HAWAIIAN <ul><li>He Ke La Mu Nu Pi We ʻ Okina </li></ul><ul><li>A E I O U </li></ul><ul><li>LANI la-a-nu-i </li></ul><ul><li>KEKOA ke-e-ke-o-a </li></ul><ul><li>HILO he-i-la-o </li></ul><ul><li>NUKU nu-u-ke-u </li></ul>
  9. 9. SPELLING OUT WORDS ORALLY IN HAWAIIAN <ul><li>He Ke La Mu Nu Pi We ʻ Okina </li></ul><ul><li>A E I O U </li></ul><ul><li>ʻ AO ʻ AO ʻ okina-a-o- ʻ okina-a-o </li></ul><ul><li>LI ʻ ILI ʻ I la-i- ʻ okina-i-la-i- ʻ okina-i </li></ul><ul><li>ʻ ĀPANA ʻ okina-a-kō-pi-a-nu-a </li></ul><ul><li>KĪWĪ ke-i-kō-we-i-kō </li></ul>
  10. 10. SPELLING OUT NON-HAWAIIAN WORDS ORALLY IN HAWAIIAN <ul><li>B C D F G J Q </li></ul><ul><li> Be Ce De Fa Ga Iota Kopa </li></ul><ul><li>R S T V X Y Z </li></ul><ul><li>Ro Sa Ti Vi Kesa Ieta Zeta </li></ul><ul><li>HESE he-e-sa-e </li></ul><ul><li>KWXX ke-we-kesa-kesa </li></ul><ul><li>DUDE de-u-de-e </li></ul>
  11. 11. FOUR SPELLING RULES <ul><li>Every word must have at least 1 vowel. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>kml p ʻw hnl </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No consonant clusters. Keep in mind that this applies to the ʻ okina also as it is considered a consonant. </li></ul><ul><li> kapla ʻleo nawkoi </li></ul><ul><li>3. Words cannot end in a consonant (including the ʻ okina). Every word must end in a vowel. </li></ul><ul><li> poin namil lo ʻ </li></ul><ul><li>4. A kahakō can only occur over a vowel. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Any questions? Please go to the thread on the Discussion Board that was created for this particular assignment and ask them there. Mahalo!

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