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A VOCABULARYAND LISTENING B GRAMMAR C CULTURE

UNIT

p5 Talking about people
Comparisons with as  as
9 Describing people y...
OI‘

E GRAMMAR

p10 Past perfect simple
and continuous

p20 Verb patterns

p32 Future continuous, 
future perfect simple
a...
Ill .  I.  I .  or "PEAN FRAMEWORK

Check your progress

Think about your progress as you work through matura Solutions Up...
THIS UNIT INCLUDES O00

Vocabulary - success and achievement - expressing opinions

- personality adjectives - talking abo...
B Past and perfect tenses

 

 

1 Read the sentences and answer the questions in brackets. 
Then complete the rules in th...
1

Great Britonstzux

In 2002 the BBC carried out a nationwide poll to find out who the
British public consider to be‘ ten...
:i= m_-rim; 

_  Survival at sea
 / 

1 Read the text,  ignoring the gaps.  Are the sentences true

or false? 

1 The Bail...
20

25

 

  

  

    

ll. 


i
i

    F   

Early in I973, 33-year-old Marilyn and Maurice Bailey were
sailing in their...
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GRAMMAR , 
E .  . . iz. mr. .. . iiici titnzs . 'i”. c'.  /ll’.  ii
Past perfect Sl m ple an...
i,  .
a‘

miulus-based discussion / 

'4 ‘ ‘T-‘'~. =‘’§.  .
it I" Sti

1 Look at the material from the Matura exam.  What ...
WRITING ANALYSIS

An account of an event

1 What makes a good story?  What should these things be like

in a good story? 
...
Work in pairs.  Look at the pictures.  Brainstorm ideas for
what happens in the story. 

 Tell the story to the class. 

9...
%r? ”s; é.'E'i. i ’

 

1 Read the information in the tables and then answer the
questions below. 

Struktura egzaminu ust...
THIS UNITINCLUDES ‘ V _ 
Vocabulary 0 money and finance 0 renting properties ‘ 1"  g , , X‘ . -
Grammar 0 Determiners (art...
GRAMMAR

Determiners

 

1 Do you agree or disagree with the following English saying? 
Give reasons. 

‘Money can't buy h...
Property boom

 

1 Look at the photos of properties for rent.  Match them with
the headings in the box. 

a furnished stu...
1

       

 

READING

Down and out

imagine that you had to give up doing one of these things. 
Which would you choose? ...
mind paying two sous7 extra? ’ Bread is a franc a pound, 
and you have exactly a franc.  / Vhen you think that you too
mig...
§“£‘l’i. lr7‘l-‘VA

-£:5~ Verb patterns/ ~

4. F: 

1 Read the text.  What is unusual about the restaurant that
it describ...
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can prcrcitt flu prcr a. i1ri'wiir

1
I

       

o a cf .1 . «.'t. '.tcnisi: Z in .1 a'ir(: t.rJi: i1.
DISC uss...
J

Elm Work in pairs.  Say whether you agree or disagree
with each of the points. 

1 Society often judges people accordin...
Essay:  for and against

1 Work in pairs.  You are going to write an essay called:  The
best things in life are free.  Thi...
§. ..t%. E<= .i5;. .;fi§. sE, ¥§t@E   i:  w   .  1-2.

Vocabulary
1 Complete the definitions with the words in the box. 

a...
;*? 'sr£ri. L;s. .- to. -.  .  l  . -. .1-2.

Reading Speaking

3 Work in pairs.  What would be the main advantages and
di...
1 Getreadyto LISTEN Work in pairs. Tell your partner about

an occasion when you lost or found some money. 

5 This must b...
THIS UNIT INCLUDES r

Vocabulary 0 stages of life - colloquial language - phrasal verbs - phrases used
in presentations I ...
.~ I " = .1.<. t=ufurett. .

 I J Talking about the future]



1 Choose the best tense.  Then match each example to a rule...
ctlllrillila , 

 

In the recording studios in Abbey Road,  London,  it’s business as
usuaI. The band members stamp and g...
, 

l I

:1 gynnrgr re; 

_ lwork in pairs.  Ask and answer the questions. 

1 How often do you argue with your parents? 
...
6 solutions upper_intermediate_student_s_book
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6 solutions upper_intermediate_student_s_book

  1. 1. A VOCABULARYAND LISTENING B GRAMMAR C CULTURE UNIT p5 Talking about people Comparisons with as as 9 Describing people you know p6 Past and perfect tenses p7 Heroes Reading: Great Britons 9 People talking about their heroes MATURA pl! Lesson 1 For what “-5 p15 Value and price p16 Determiners p17 Property Boom worth Expressions connected with money Articles and Vocabulary: Describing houses and flats Dflblfl Rozumienie ze sluchu q“a”"fie’5 ,3 III Rozumienie ze sluchu Prdwda / O lemma (Z 52 Talking about precious and valuable The smallest apartment in the UK things ~ LAllGlJAfiE REVIEW Units 1-2 p24 - SKILLS ROUIID-LIP Units 1-1 p25 MATURA p26 Lesson 2 from cradle p27 Stages of life p28 Talking about the p29 Young and old to grave Phrasal verbs with up and down _ mm” Reading: Talking about my generation I III Rozumienie ze sluchu “me “"565 Vocabulary: colloquial phrases W’9[°k’°“"V ‘”Vb°" 9 How we can improve the lives of Talking about people’s lives elderly people MATURA p36 Lesson 3 out of this 1137 Space p38 Passive p39 Science Fiction world Space travel Reading: Ancient III Rozumienie tekstu czytanego 9 Rozumienie ze slum“ astronauts Prowda / Falsz Dobieranle War ofthe Worlds Space tourism 9 III Rozumienie ze sluchu W/ ‘elokrotny wybér Extract from War ofthe Worlds - LAIIeuAG: REvIEw Units 24 p46 - SKILLS Itounp-UP Units 1-4 p47 MATURA plus Lesson A p49 Headlines Newspaper headlines 9 News reports p50 Reported speech: statements and questions p51 Newspapers In Stosowanie struktur leksykalno- gramatycznych Siowotworsrwo 9 How people receive the news MATURA p58 Lesson 5 p59 Opinion and belief p60 Question forms p61 Religion 9 Expressing opinions 5!] Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Prowdu Falsz The Growth ofa ‘Religion’ 9 The Dalai Lama - lAllGl. IAGE REVIEW Units 5-6 p68 - SKILLS RouIII>-Ur Units H p69 MATURA p70 Lesson 6 p71 Global warming p72 Advice. p73 our vanishing planet Compound nouns obllgaK_'9" 3"d III Stosowanle struktur lek5ykalno- Environmental protection pmhibmon §'3'“3tV5Z"'Y‘h Ti‘-’5”“k 9 Helping to prevent global warming Sm/ -,u0SL$’[: m/E to’ need’ See it _ before W5 mt’ late 9 Endangered species Vocabulary: Environmental protection p81 The Internet p82 Modals in the p83 Social networking sites Using the Internet P35‘ Ifl Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Prawda 9 Rozumienie ze sluchu 5h°“’d h‘7V‘~’- might / F5151 Wielokrotny wybcir Zj? (‘1’: ;tii’e“€’gg)°Ve- When information becomes T. M.| . Talking about using the lnternet neednlthave ’ 9 M Rozumienie ze sluchu Wielokromy wybzir - LAIIGHAGE REVIEW Units 7-8 p90 - SKILLS ROUND-UP Units 1-8 p91 MATURA p92 Lesson 6 A step on p93 Allin a day’s work p94 Habitual p95 In search of a better life 9 ladda. Jobs and work beh3‘"°t“" d Reading: Coming to America 9 Talking aboutwork (pzrfgen an 9 Immigration to the Ul<from the EU MATURA p102 Lesson 9 p103 Animals ploll Talking about p105 The British and their pets Animal parts | ')lr’e"s“er'1§l‘a3|_I5§s 9 Rozumienie ze sluchu l/ I// ‘elokrotny Animal idioms f ‘ WYb0f 9 [El Rozumienie ze sluthu u we) Dobieronie - LAIIeuAc: IIEvIEw Units 9-10 p112 - SKILLS ROUND-UP Units 1-10 p113 MATLIRA p114 Lesson 10 VOCABULARY BUILDER p13o WORDLIST p142 GRAMMAR BuILoER Arro RErErrErIcE p115 D READING p8 Survival at sea III Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dobieranie Adrift on the ocean p18 Down and out Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dobieranie Extract from George Orwell’s Down and Out in London and Paris Vocabulary: Non-metric measures Vocabulary: phrases for presenting arguments, giving examples and disagreeing p30 Closing the generation gap III Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Wielokrotny wybdr How to be a good parent: at teenagers guide Vocabulary: formation ofadiectives plio The ride of a lifetime III Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dobieranie Confessions of an astronaut p52 111e price of fame Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Prawda/ Falsz Paparazzi ~ a necessaw evil Speaking: Role play p62 Quiz show Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dobieranie Game show scandals Vocabulary: TV-related words p74 Waste not want not H] Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dobieranie Food for free Vocabulary: Diets p84 Another world Rozumienie tekstu czylanego Wielokrotny wybor The man who is paid to be an alien p96 Making a name for yourself III Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dobferunie 9 Song: Katie Mellua Call offthe search p106 Animal communication Ifl Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dobieranie Mowienie Rozmowa na podstawie materialu stymulujqcego Animal intelligence COM MU II ICAT IVE ACTIVITIES p149
  2. 2. OI‘ E GRAMMAR p10 Past perfect simple and continuous p20 Verb patterns p32 Future continuous, future perfect simple and continuous p42 Passive: advanced structures Reading: De revolutionibus p54 Reporting verbs Other reporting structures péh Question tags Tag questions p76 Speculating: present. past and future p86 Mixed conditionals p98 Future in the past was to and was to have p108 Nominal clauses Nominal clauses with that Nominal clauses with what and all 9 Listening [101 = disk 1, track 1 / 2.01 L disk 2, track 1) F SPEAKING p11 Stimulus-based discussion Mowienie Rozmowo no podstuwie mater/ alu srymulujqcego Vocabulary: types ofgraphs and charts p21 Stimulus-based discussion In Mowienie Rozmowo no podstawle moterlolu stymulu/ qcego Vocabulary: phrases to gain thinking time Vocabulary: presenting pros and cons p33 Presentation Vocabulary: structuring a presentation; giving opinions, examples, additional information; summing up 9 Presentation W Mowienie Prezentocjcr temotu I‘ dyskusjo p43 Presentation 9 In Rozumienie ze sluchu Dobieranie Space exploration Vocabulary: making a point, acknowledging an opposing point, restating your point p55 Talking about statistics El Méwienie Rozmowo no podstowie moteriolu stymulujqcego Media habits Vocabulary: talking about graphs, numbers, proportions, percentages p65 Expressing opinions 0 In Rozumienie ze sluchu Wielokrotny wyb0'r Vocabulary: Phrases for emphasising a point p77 Stim ulus-based discussion Vocabulary: paraphrasing In Mowienie Rozmowo no podstuwie muteriolu stymuluiqcego Nuclear disarmament p87 Discussion Reacting to two stories Vocabulary: Phrases for agreeing and disagreeing p99 A job interview 9 A job interview p109 Presentation Providing an introduction to the presentation Vocabulary: expressing opinions It'll Matura task G wnmrro AuALvsIs plz An account of an event Grammar: stylistic inversion Vocabulary; extreme adiectives p22 Essay: for and against Structuring an opinion essay Vocabulary; Expressing contrast p34 Description ofa person Vocabulary: Describing people's appearance and personality plrd Narrative Vocabulary: sequencing clauses p57 Review Vocabulary: types of literature and stow: adjectives to describe a story p66 Essay: opinion Morality Vocabulary: Phrases for introducing additional and contrasting points p78 Essay: for and against Structuring your arguments p88 Online CV Vocabulary: abbreviations and acronyms p100 A letter of application Vocabulary: formal language p110 Description Expressing purpose: infinitive, in order that, so that G wRmRc TASK p13 An account of an event III Wypowiedi pisemna Opis p23 Essay: for and against Vocabulary: presenting both sides ofthe argument In Wypowiedz pisemna Rozprowku p35 Description of: person Vocabulary: summing up a description Wypowiedi pisemna Opis osoby phs Narrative Vocabulary: improving your style; intensifying adverbs wypowiedi pisemna Opowiodonie p58 Review Vocabulary: describing plots and characters; giving opinions and summing up III Wypowledi pisemna Recenz/ ‘o p67 Essay: opinion Wypowiedi pisemna Rozprowko D79 Essay: for and against Vocabulary: introducing the topic; phrases for introducing arguments W Wypowiedz pisemna Ra/ prowko p89 Online CV Vocabulary: describing jobs In Wypowiedi pisemna Rozprawku pm! A letter of application Structuring a formal letter on! Description Endangered animal Ill] Wypowiedi pisemna Opis
  3. 3. Ill . I. I . or "PEAN FRAMEWORK Check your progress Think about your progress as you work through matura Solutions Upper—lntermediate. After completing Skills Round-up 1-4 read each statement and write the number ofticks (/ ) that is true for you. Do the same again after Skills Round-up 1-10. / = I need more practice. // = I sometimes find this difficult. // /= No problem! Skills Skills ‘ In English I can Round-up Round-up 1-4 1-10 Listening B1 . understand the main points ofspeech about familiartopics and follow the main points of an extended discussion. 1A, 1C, 3B, 5A, 7A, 9A 1 B2 understand extended discussions on familiartopics and identify speakerviewpoints. 2A, 3C, AA, sc, 6A L B2 understand and react to current affairs radio programmes. 1C, 6C, 7B, 7C, 8C B2 follow complex lines of argument on familiar topics. 10C B2 ‘ understand detailed and linguistically complex descriptive and narrative passages. 2C, 3A, 4C, 9C C1 A understand a wide range of broadcast material and identify finer points of detail. liC, 10C L Reading , B1 understand the description of events and feelings. 1D, 1G B2 scan quicklythrough long and complex texts, locating relevant detail. 2D, 6D, 8D, 9C, 9D, 10D B2 understand magazine articles about current issues in which writers adopt particularviewpoints. ‘ 3D, 5D, 7D, 8C B2» understand factual articles and reports. 1C, liD, 5C, 6C, 9C C1 understand long and complex factual and literary texts. 2D, 6D, 8D Speaking TB1 express personal views on familiar topics. 2A, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4F, 6A, 6D, 7A, 8A, 9A, 10C ‘ B1 give detailed accounts of events, real or imagined. 1D, 4C, 5E,10B 1 B2 7 present detailed descriptions on a variety of familiar topics. 2E, 3A, 3B, 5F, 6C. 7F,10A l « B2 take an active part in a discussion on familiar topics. 1C, 2D, 3D, 5D, 9C B2 develop a clear argument, supporting my views at some length with relevant examples. F > A 3F, sc, 1or L _ B2 explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages. 2F, AF, 6F, 7C, 8F C1 formulate ideas and opinions and present them skilfully and coherently to others. 1F, 3C, 4F, 5F, 6F, 7F, 10F Writing B1 write accounts of experiences, describing feelings and reactions in a simple text. 1G X B1 A write detailed descriptions on a range of familiar subjects. 3G, 10G B2 A write a review ofa film, book or play. 5G B2 write detailed descriptions of real or imaginary events in a clear connected text. 1G, 4G B2 i write an essay which develops an argument, giving reasons in support ofor against a particular ‘F i , ‘ point ofview. 6G l B2 write an essay which develops an argument, explaining the advantages and disadvantages of various options. 2G, 7G C1 Y. .. expand and support views with subsidiary points, reasons and examples. 6G C1 ‘1 write formally correct letters. 9G Ii l Check your progress © Oxford University Press Photocopiable
  4. 4. THIS UNIT INCLUDES O00 Vocabulary - success and achievement - expressing opinions - personality adjectives - talking about your heroes 0 describing graphs - extre'ne adjectives 8. qualifying adverbs Grammar 0 Talking about the past 0 Past perfect simple and continuous Speaking I a presentation I stimulus-based discussion A 1 Eifllimfl Look at the photos. Describe what is happening. What do you need to be like to do these activities? l 3:‘. .1. ; ti‘il7; VOCABULARY AND LISTENING ’. 'ill_c'I‘. c . ’.7'l”. 't, 'lf. ’:‘l. :‘'. 2 Match the personality adjectives (1-12) with their opposites (a—l). You can use your dictionary to help you. 1 tolerant a hot-headed 2 generous b insecure 3 considerate c narrow-minded A self—confident d tight—fisted 5 outgoing e thoughtless 6 level-headed f reserved 5 9 1.01 Listen again. What examples of behaviour do the 7 courteous g Cheerful speakers give in support oftheir opinions? 8 bigheaded h unreliable 6 SPEAKING Give real or invented examples of how people 9 grumpy i ill-mannered behave when they are being: 10 dependable j sophisticated 1 ”3”°W'mi”ded 5 3’”mPV _ 2 considerate 6 big-headed 11 “awe k modest 3 ill-mannered 7 (You choose an adjective. ) 12 argumentative I compliant 4 naive 8 (YOU CIIOOSE an Hdiective-) 7 EHEEIIE Think ofthree people thatyou know well. Describe them to your partner, using personality adjectives, and giving examples oftheir behaviour. In Vocabulary Builder 1.1: Talking about people: p.130 My sister is quite . For example, she sometimes ‘I Q 1.01 Listen to five people describing people they know. Which adjective from exercise 2 best describes the person? My friend jacek is a person. He‘5 always 1 Amy thinks that her brotheris 2 Carl thinks that his friend Sam is 3 Marythinks that her cousin is A Neil thinks thathis fatheris 5 Vickythinks that her sisteris - Czlowiek Unit 1 - Against the odds I 5 3 Which adjectives in exercise 2 have (a) positive or neutral connotations (b) negative connotations? on Vocabulary Builder 1.2: Comparisons with as. ..as: p. 130
  5. 5. B Past and perfect tenses 1 Read the sentences and answer the questions in brackets. Then complete the rules in the Learn this! box with the correct tenses. 1 Past continuous and past simple When Chelsea was leaving the house, she saw herfriend. When Bob left school, he got a/ ob as a receptionist. (Did Chelsea see herfriend at the same time as leaving the house? Did Bob get a job as a receptionist at the same time as leaving school? ) 2 Past simple and past perfect When jack arrived, Sandra put on her coat. When jack arrived, Penny had put on her coat. (Who put her coat on before Jack arrived? ) 3 Present perfect and past simple jenny went to Paris last summer. Woody has been to Paris too. (Do we know when Jenny or Woody went to Paris? ) 4 Present perfect continuous and present perfect simple Tom has been learning Polish, but he can only saya few words. Lucy has learned a new word in Polish: ‘dobry’. (Has Tom finished learning Polish? Has Lucy finished learning that word? ) Past and perfect tenses 1 We use the fora longer action that is interrupted by a shorter action. We use the for a shorter action that interrupts a longer one, or for a sequence of short actions. We use the for an action that happened before a specific time in the past. We use the for actions that happened at a specific time in the past. We use the for an action that happened at an unspecified time in the past. We use the for an action that happened at a specific time in the past. We use the _t for recent actions that are completed. We use the for recent actions that are still in progress. . a—““"‘ ""531 J. ‘ U») N 2 Choose the correct tense. Explain your choice with reference to the rules in the Learn this! box. a I’ve done / I’ve been doing the ironing. |’ve only got three more shirts to iron. b When I phoned Karen, she was worried because her brotherdidn't arrive / hadn’t arrived home. c I’ve never tried Vietnamese food, but I had / I've had Thai food. d I found / was finding my wallet when I was walking home from the shops. e I’ve never met a famous person, but I saw / I've seen Hugh Grant in London last year. 6 ’ Unit1-Againsttheodds ll Complete the text with the correct I (an ccrrccrly use vi iviriciy cf part xiiir/ .’ pcrfacr mixer. 3 Read the Learn this! box. Then correct the mistakes in sentences a—d. - We never use a continuous tense with state verbs such as know, like, love, understand, believe, own. 0 We never use a continuous tense when we say how many times an action occurred. 0 We never use the present perfect when we specifythe moment in the past (e. g. yesterday, five days ago, on 31st December 2001, etc. ). With action verbs, we use the present perfect continuous with for or since to say how long an action has been in progress. _Ll-ZARN THIS! ‘ 0 a I've never been believing in Father Christmas. X b I've been asking him three times, but he hasn't told me yet. X c Rita and Ahmed have arrived two minutes ago. X d How long have you studied English? X 00 Grammar Builder 1.1: Past and perfect tenses: p. 115 tense ofthe verbs in brackets. Our cat, Mackie, doesn't have many of his nine lives left. He 1 (have) far too many accidents over the past year. For example, six months ago, while he 2 (climb) a tree, he 3 (fall) off a branch, not onto his feet, like other cats, but onto his back! But his worst accident "’ (happen) while we 5 (spend) the weekend visiting our cousins. Our neighbour, who 6 (go) to feed him that morning, found him lying in the road. A car 7 (hit) him the night before. Mackie 8 (break) his tail and two legs. We 9 (rush) home immediately and 1° (take) him to the vet's. Since then, he ” (recover) at home with us, but he's still not completely better. He 12 (not be) outside again yet, although he wants to go out and chase birds. The vet says he's lucky to be alive, and hopes he will be more careful in future. 5 Eiiflillfi Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions using full sentences. Be careful to use the correct past tense in your replies. 1 What did you do last Saturday evening? 2 Have you ever stayed up all night? 3 What were you doing at seven o’cIock yesterday evening? 4 How long have you been learning English? 5 How long have you lived in your present home? 6 When did you last use a computer?
  6. 6. 1 Great Britonstzux In 2002 the BBC carried out a nationwide poll to find out who the British public consider to be‘ ten greatest Britons. One million people voted for their favourites by phoning in or visitingthe BBC website. There were eight men and two women in the list, and the two women were members 2 the British Royal family: Queen Elizabeth I and Diana, Princess ofWa| es. Former Beatle John Lennon was in seventh place and William Shakespeare was placed fifth. The winner, however, with half a million votes, was Winston Churchill, who was Prime Minister of Britain during the Second World War. Here are the top ten: 1 Churchill [1874-1965] 2 Brunei [1806-59, engineer] 3 Diana [19E1—9?] 4 Darwin [1BD9—B2, scientist who wrote about the theory of evolution] 5 Shakespeare [15644616] 8 Newton (1643—1?2?, scientist who described gravity and the laws of motion] 7 Lennon [194D—BD] 8 Elizabeth I [1533-1603] 9 Nelson [1?58~1BD5, admiral] 10 Cromwell [1599~165B, military and political leader] 1 Can you name any of the famous Britons in the pictures? What were they famous for? 2 Read the Use of English tip. Then read the text and complete each gap with a suitable word. W5/tazziwka nmt/ Ira/ rm Wtego typu zadaniu (uzupelnianie luk) brakujace slowa sa czesto przyimkami, przedimkami, czasownikami posilkowymi itp. 3 Answer the questions. 1 How many women appeared in the top ten? 2 Which famous musician appeared in the list? 3 How many votes did the winner get? 4 What kind of people had some commentators thought would appear in the top ten? How many ofthe top ten are dead? 6 Can you explain the phrase ‘famous for being famous’? U1 4 9 1.02 Listen to three young people deciding who their top three Britons are. Tick their final choices. 1 Lewis Hamilton 2 Emmeline Pankhurst 3 l. K. Rowling 1; Tim Berners-Lee 5 Robbie Williams lll_li‘ll ll - Elementy wied7y o krajach anglojezycznych - Stosowanie struktur leksykalno-gramatycznych Test luk I (fill L’(i‘iK ‘Ti iii)” Cl‘ll‘i'.7l“' rt: l*. c'li kmmi: ,rt: ,nl. . Some social commentators had expected the top ten 3 include the likes of David Beckham and Robbie Williams. Interestingly, however, none of the top ten people is alive, “ perhaps indicates that the British are not as obsessed with celebrity as they sometimes appear. Mary Oakland, 5 lecturer in Media Studies at Sunderland University, commented, ‘The British have a voracious appetite for media and celebrity celebrities gossip. But although they love reading 5 in magazines, it doesn't mean that they consider these people to be great when placed alongside great figures from history. People realise that many celebrities arejust ‘famous for being famous’ — they are entertaining, but most people don't take 7 seriously. ’ 5 Q 1.02 Listen again and complete the sentences. agree disagree hasto need opinion think true 1 Who do you is the greatest Briton then, out ofthis list? 2 I think he be in ourtop three. 3 In my , the two don't compare. 14 I with that. 5 That’s , but the othertwo on the list are also modern success stories, aren’t they? 6 I . Robbie Williams is only famous for singing. 7 OK, we to agree on the top three. 6 BEIEIIE Who do you think are the greatest Poles? Work in pairs or small groups, discuss your choices and agree on the top three. Use the expressions in the box to help you. Expressing opinions In my opinion/ view, / To my mind, / Personally, I think I don’t agree. / I’m not sure aboutthat. / I see your point, but / Surely you don’t thinkthat I agree. /Absolutely. / I’d go along with that. Unit1-Againsttheodds i 7
  7. 7. :i= m_-rim; _ Survival at sea / 1 Read the text, ignoring the gaps. Are the sentences true or false? 1 The Baileys were expecting theirjourney to take about two years. Their yacht was struck by a whaling ship. They managed to take enough food with them from the yacht to survive. Mrs Bailey was psychologically stronger than her husband. They were adrift for over four months. They were finally rescued by some fishermen. The Baileys decided never to sail again. DUN) l0U'| .b " '1 "’'_", 'F i’A,7'. (./ (1/iW. ,(t' iiI()‘I! /1?]/7/4 W tego typu zadaniu najpierw przeczytaj caly tekst, by zrozumieé jego sens. Nastepnie przeczytaj zdania iznajdi powiazanla z tematem, gramatyka i slownictwem przy lukach. Zacznij od wypelniania najlatwieiszych luk. Sprawdi swoje odpowiedzi, prébujac dodatkowego zdania we wszystkich lukach. Read the reading tip. Match the sentences (A—G) with the gaps (1-6). There is one sentence that you do not need. A To make matters worse, there were two terrible storms and the boat overturned, so they lost their compass and some water containers. B But for days, they were unable to eat because their stomachs had shrunk so much. They realised that they didn’t have much time. One reason forthis was the lack of fresh water to drink. However, the weeks passed and no islands came into view. F The crew, who were Korean, had wondered what it was that they could see on the horizon, and had come to take a closer look. G They ate the few tins of food they had brought with them and collected plenty of rainwater. | "'| U(W Underline the following words and phrases in the text and translate them. What is the function of these words in the text? First paragraph early in 1973 six months before then Second paragraph while then Third paragraph forthe first few days Fourth paragraph the weeks turned into months towards the end of all ofa sudden at one point 8 ) Unit 1 - Against the odds Fifth paragraph suddenly Sixth paragraph finally two years later (I Find nouns in the text from the same word families as these adjectives. OU'IJ>wN>- horrified (line 18) miserable (line 38) resigned (line 39) obstinate (line 40) determined (line 40) relieved (line 47) 5 Match the hightlighted verbs in the text with the definitions. n—nn—n --ooooioau1.r. ~w~. _» decay and fall apart become worse sit or fall down heavily flow quickly climb or move with difficulty cry noisily blow air into something become tired and weak pull with difficulty take hold of something suddenly or roughly move slowly with the sea currents orwinds 6 EPEEIIE Work in pairs or small groups. Imagine you were marooned on a small uninhabited island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. What would you do to survive? How would you get off the island? Brainstorm ideas. Think about these things and use the phrases in the box to help you. 1 OU'I-I-‘hllxl food? water? shelter? dangerous animals? a raft? how to signal to passing ships? First we would We wouldn’t As for (food) We’d try to In order to It would be important to 7 Present your ideas to the class. Vocabulary‘ Builder 1.3: Success & achievement: p.131 MATURA Podrozowanie i tun/ styka 0 Rozumienie tekstu czylanego Prawda / Falsz 0 Dobie/ anie
  8. 8. 20 25 ll. i i F Early in I973, 33-year-old Marilyn and Maurice Bailey were sailing in their 3 l »foot yacht down the west coast of South America. They had left Southampton on the south coast of England six months before, and were half—way through their journey to New Zealand. On 4 March they had just passed a whaling ship, when all of a sudden there was a terrible crashing noise. They ran outside to see the water red with blood and a huge whale disappearing under the waves. Then they noticed an enormous hole in the hull of the boat. through which water was pouring into the cabin. Maurice started inflating a small rubber dinghy, while Marilyn started grabbing things. They tied the dinghy to the yacht and started throwing the things in it ~ tins of food, a small oil burner, a map and compass, glue to repair the dinghy, water containers, knives, mugs and passports. Then they clambered into the dinghy, untied it and watched in horror as their beautifu. yacht sank under the water. For the first few days, the Baileys were reasonably comfortable. 7 To keep themselves entertained and to pass the time, they made card games from the pages ofa notebook. they planned a huge party for when they got back to safety, and even designed a replacement yacht! As their food supplies were disappearing fast, they started eating turtles, seabirds and fish (including six baby sharks), which they managed to catch with a safety pin on a string, or with their bare hands. Several ships passed. but despite j‘. ;l%I:3 iilviislufiivaielw waving madly, they didn’t succeed in attracting attention. They hoped they were drifting towards the Galapagos islands, which were a few hundred miles to the west. 3 The weeks turned into months and the struggle to survive became harder and harderTheir clothes started to rot and they became badly sunburnt. The dinghy began to deteriorate, too. 4 They were even surrounded by sharks at one point. Towards the end of the third month, they became so sunburnt and dehydrated they could hardly move. Maurice Bailey was filled with misery and resignation. He said that the reason they survived was because of his wife's obstinacy and determination. ’She kept morale high when l flagged, ’ he recalled. ‘When l was prepared to give up hope, she was there beside me. ' On 30 June, when they could not have survived much longer, they suddenly saw a fishing boat coming towards them. 5 The ship's captain, Suh Chung—il, said, ‘We hauled them aboard. They didn't say anything. They just slumped on the deck, sobbing with relief. ’ The Baileys drank lots of liquid and the crew massaged their arms and legs until finally they could move again. 4 When they were well enough. the couple went ashore In l-lono uiu and flew back to England. Within two years, they had bought another boat and had set sail again — to study whales! 30 35 40 45 SO Unitl-Againstthe odds 9
  9. 9. I mil Zwlk . ik7Cii/ GRAMMAR , E . . . iz. mr. .. . iiici titnzs . 'i”. c'. /ll’. ii Past perfect Sl m ple and conti n uous / in 1 Read the text and underline examples ofthe past perfect 3 Complete the sentences. Use the past perfect continuous and a simple and past perfect continuous. phrase from the box. wear new shoes cook dinner play on the beach not pay attention travel for six hours use her make-up not sleep very well In zooo . l'.1rl< Inglis became the first person to climb Everest with two false legs. .Iz1rk had been climbing for most of his life and so was an experienced mountaineer. but hc’d lost both his legs in I982 in an accident. 1 James looked tired because . 2 When I got home, there was a lovely smell. Kate . When we finally got to London, we Sam couldn’t do the exercise because I had sore feet because I Stella was cross because her sister . The children were covered in sand because they Noxmaw 1! Complete the sentences. Use the past perfect simple or the past perfect continuous. Say which of the rules in the Learn this! box each sentence exemplifies. 1 The ground was wet because it (rain). lilllfv Z On 2| June 2oo1 Erik Veihcnm:1} er reached the summit of Everest. Like all _ ‘ 2 When the bus finally arrived, I , T,, (wait) for over half people who climb I<. 'crest, he an hour_ lTs1dbCC“ twining f01' m0nth5- 3 lane (change) so much that I hardly recognised I lowcxcr. what made lirilis her. Achievement special was thc 4 Matthews hands were covered in oil. He S (mend) fact that he'd been totally blind h'5 b'ke' _ . _ V _ ' 5 T (know) each other for SIX years when they got for 20 C:1l . ' married, but theyeonlyego) out fora 'l‘I : 0 -~ I’ l yea" 11LlOu_n~"cS_tl7cl“_’fm U? C lm 3 6 Their hands were freezing. Theyp (make) snowmen. I3"Cl‘C5t 15 All“I~’§ I'l7‘-‘ 5hCrP‘1- 7 Tom _j__ (play) the piano for three years when he took "hen she reached the summit the exam. 00 Grammar Builder 1.2: Past perfect simple and continuous: p. 115 she'd just turned 15 and had been working on her f.11nil_"s farm since lc; i'ing school :1 5 Complete the sentences with as many different past tense forms will mllmi as you can. Try to explain any differences in meaning. 1 When I left home g (snow). 2 Choose the correct alternatives to complete the rules. ‘i was -snrmiirj / it had been snowlrg 2 Jack was upset because I O him (not talk). .6,‘ past and perfect tenses 3 I was worried because a strange man T (follow) me E 1 We use the past perfect simple / continuous for a h°me- _ ,5 completed action that happened before a specific 1‘ l ‘"35 -°'”lP”5ed that‘/0” T (lake) 50 mail)’ Photos- ; time in the past. 5 When I got home, H (cook) lunch. T 2 We uS, e the past perfect gimme C, " continuous to 6 EHHKHE Work in pairs. When did you last feel like this? explain the cause of something in the past. We use the past perfect simple / continuous ifthe cause exhausted relieved irritated delighted confused went on for some time. embarrassed scared amazed 3 With state verbs (know, be, like, etc. ). we use the . _ past perfect Simple / continuous with for or since Find out why your partner felt these emotions. Use appropriate to say how long an action had been in progress. P351 t9"595- I 4 With. action verbs, we use the past perfect simple/ Because I'd stayed up late continuous with for ors/ nce to say how long an the night before. / Because action had been in progress. I'd been running. 10 ) Unit 1 0 Against the odds
  10. 10. i, . a‘ miulus-based discussion / '4 ‘ ‘T-‘'~. =‘’§. . it I" Sti 1 Look at the material from the Matura exam. What is the overall topic? 2 9 1.03 Listen to Danuta doing the Matura task. In what order does she talk about the material? quote D photo D headline graph D statistics D 3 91.03 Listen again and tickthe phrases (a or b) that she uses. 1 a The material is all related to the topic of b E The material is to do with 2 a : The photo on the left shows b In the photo on the left, I can see 3 a i: The headline suggests that b _ The newspaper headline says that li a _ The graph gives statistics about the percentage of b El The graph shows the numbers of. .. . _ ‘ 5 a 3 There's a quote from a head teacher which W 4' 1, suggests that ’” . ‘ y E b A head teacher is quoted as saying , ) ék 9* — ' i 6 a : i The statistics in the boximplythat 1 b The statistics in the box at the bottom tell us that ~ mm: 7 a To sum up, then, b : , To summarise, then, ' ’ 4 What opinion does Danuta express about (a) the quote, 100 5 (b) the statistics? xo 0 I 5 Label the types of graph and chart with the words in the box. pie chart bar graph table of statistics line graph GiTl5’P355'T3te -" I I Pass-rate % l on O O I I Boys’ pass-rate —— ,2_ W . ._ . _ 45 40; ‘A '—'"‘* ’ 35 , oo o N -r o 00 O o o e o c 3° O o o o o o ,5 Fl N N N N N Percentage of students gaining a pass ‘Some pupils are switching from maths and science to supposedly easier subjects such as psychology and media ‘studies, ’ f 2001 2002 ' 2003 I 2004 ‘zoos Claims head teacher. 45.3 48.6 I 51.3 53.3 32.1 I _ _ ” ''3’23‘§5.’4 36.8 39.4 40.1 50 . . 68.4 0. 6.‘ . , égié Girls passrate 96.4% if 4 Boys’ pass—r*ate 94.3% w clonal) 6 Turn to page 149 and do the task. MATURA Szkola 0 Méwienie Razmawa ria padstawie materialu stymulu/ qcega Unit 1 ' Against the odds 11
  11. 11. WRITING ANALYSIS An account of an event 1 What makes a good story? What should these things be like in a good story? 4 the ending 5 thelanguage 1 the beginning 2 the plot 3 the characters Read ]ames’s story. The opening paragraph (A) is missing. Which of these paragraphs makes the best opening, do you think? Give reasons. 1 I am shy, but last month I took part in the school play. It was an unexpected success. 2 I am quite a shy person and I don’t speak much in class. Last month, however, something happened which surprised everybody, especially me. 3 Last month, I took part in a play. It was an unexpected success because I acted very well, even though I was nervous. Complete the writing plan with the phrases in the box. background information the conclusion the main events Paragraph A introduction that draws reader into the story. Paragraph B (who? when? where? what? ) Paragraph C (what? where? when? how? why? feelings? ) Paragraph D (what? how? consequences? feelings? ) Find these sentences in paragraphs C and D, and complete them. What is unusual about them? 1 Onlythen that no one would recognise me. 2 So nervous the following day, that I couldn't stop shaking. 3 Never so proud. to Grammar Builder 1.3: Stylistic inversion: p.116 James uses a lot of phrases to sequence events in his story (e. g. then, after that, finally). Find and underline them. Wskazéwata mm/ /a/ Ira Poniisze elementy pomoga ci w uioieniu interesujacej historii: 1 uporzadkowanie slow, 2 inwersja stylistyczna, 3 wykrzykniki, 4 mowa bezposrednia, 5 przymiotniki skrajne (np. enormous zamiast very big, freezing zamiast very cold). 12 l Unitl-Againsttheodds 7 J E. ’/ll‘ ixi”ifC xii . ~.((ciir. : 'uT. ’ii1t‘ivciiZ. 6 Read the writing tip and find examples of features 3, ti and 5 in the story. on Vocabulary Builder 1.4: Extreme adjectives: p.131 An Unexpected Success by James A B Our school always puts on an end—of-year play. and this year it was the story of King Arthur. I have never acted in any of these plays — I have always been prompter. It’ s my job To remind the actors when they forget their lines. it usually means that I know everybody’s lines by the end of the rehearsals. C But the day before the play, disaster struck! The boy who was playing the wizard Merlin had fallen ill the night before. The teacher said to me, ‘Can you play Merlin? You are the only person who knows the lines. We think you can do it. ’ I was absolutely horrified, but the teacher persuaded me to try the costume on. Only then did I realise that no one would recognise me, because Merlin wears a long hat and beard! $0 I spent all that day rehearsing with the teacher until I felt a bit more confident. D So nervous was I the following day. that I couldn’t stop shaking. But when it started. I relaxed a bit. and after a while, I even began to enjoy it. it went very well. At the end of the play. I took off my hat and beard to bow to the audience. Everybody gasped and applauded when they realised it was me. Never have I felt so proud. Now I am a lot less shy‘, and next year I'll definitely be in the play again! 23? words — Cziowiek 0 Kullura 0 Wypowiedi pisemna Opis
  12. 12. Work in pairs. Look at the pictures. Brainstorm ideas for what happens in the story. Tell the story to the class. 9 1.05 Listen to Natasha's story. How is it different from yours? You are going to write the story from the point ofview of Sally. (You can make the character a boy, if you wish. ) Copy out this writing plan, leaving plenty of space to add notes. Paragraph A: introduction Paragraph B: background information Paragraph C: main events Paragraph D: conclusion Work in pairs. Brainstorm ideas for a first short paragraph. Here are some phrases to help you. Last week something happened that I would never have dreamed that The most wonderful thing happened It was an experience that has changed my life. Had you told me that , I wouldn’t have believed you. Rarely have I been so pleasantly surprised. Make notes for the second, third and fourth paragraphs. Think about these things. What happened? Why? Who was involved? When and where? How did you / other people feel? Make notes for the final paragraph. What happened in the end? How did you feel? How has it changed you? Write a rough draft of the story. Look for opportunities to use the features listed in the writing tip on page 12. Count the words in your story. If there are fewer than 200, do one or more ofthese things. 0 Describe some ofthe events in more detail. 0 Add adjectives and adverbs. If you have written more than 250 words. do one or more of these things. - Look for unnecessary repetition. - Look for words or sentences that are not essential. - Describe some ofthe events in less detail. Have you 4, followed the paragraph plan? _l used some ofthe features in the writing tip on page 12? ' checked the spelling and grammar? Now write a final copy of your story. MATUVR_A Czlowiek - Kultura - Wypowiedi pisemna Opis Tournament 5‘ EAWGVAS School Longbridgg Sclrtool Friday l3tI Tune 5‘li-0P'M All welcome 25 7.4 $1’ EMAMRD5 I. .ONG»I&| §fi£ Uriit’; eAgein; '.i‘io. odd«: ‘ 1'
  13. 13. %r? ”s; é.'E'i. i ’ 1 Read the information in the tables and then answer the questions below. Struktura egzaminu ustnego na poziomie rozszerzonym Zad. 1 Rozmowa na podstawie . . 6 materiaiu stymuluiacego 7 Zad. 2 Prezentacja tematu i dyskusja 7 Razem 2o Struktura egzaminu pisemnego na poziomie rozszerzonym Stosowanie transformacje struktur leksykalno- test luk gramatycznych 5 slowotworstwo tlumaczenie opis Wypowiedi 18 opowiadanie pisemna recenzja rozprawka prawda / falsz Rozumienie 1 Wiel‘3k’°mV ze sluchu 5 WYb°" dobieranie Rozumienie test luk tekstu czytanego sterowany i rozpoznawanie 12 (wielokrotny struktur leksykalno- Wvbéfi gramatycznych 5o 1 How many parts does the written exam consist of? What will you have to do in each part? 2 What is the maximum score for the oral exam? What can you get points for? 3 Which ofthe following text types cannot appear in the written paper: story, newspaper article, description ofa place, formal letter? 2 Work in pairs. Make a list ofyour five greatest personalities in history. Justify your choices. 3 Do the Matura exam task. Przeczytaj tekst, Na podstawie zawartych w nim informacii zdecyduj, ktore 2 podanych zdafi sa zgodne z jego trescia (TRUE), a ktére nie (FALSE). Zaznacz znakiem X odpowiednia rubryke w tabeli. Za kaida poprawna odpowiedi otrzymasz 1 punkt. The True Lady with the Lamp The Crimean V/ Var remains in our memories almost solely because of one person, Florence Nightingale, whose devotion to the wounded men in her care was legendary. But it is now emerging that the ‘Lady with the Lamp’ was not really the best-loved nurse ofthat war. That honour lies with a woman called Mary Seacole. Seacole’s name does not appear in history books, yet back in the 18505 she was celebrated for adininistering care to British boys on the front line. And it was she, rather than Florence Nightingale, whom soldiers considered the true ‘Mother of the Army’. While Miss Nightingale worked at the official military hospital from the safety of Turkish shores, Mrs Seacole set up her own supply store and medical unit at Spring Hill, just five miles from the front. She went into the war zone, armed with bandages and medicines, to tend casualties. Born in Jamaica in 1805, Mary was the daughter of a Jamaican ‘doctress’ who ran a boarding house for British soldiers, and a Scottish officer named Grant, about whom little is known. From her mother she learned much about herbal remedies, and in 1850, while running a hotel in Panama with her brother, she tended victims ofa cholera epidemic. When war broke out in the Crimea in 1853, confident of her medical experience, she departed for Britain to offer her services. By the time she arrived, however, Florence Nightingale and her 38 nurses had already left for Scutari. V/ hat followed was a series of official rebuffs. Although there is no documentation as to why she was rejected, Mary Seacole, in her autobiography, wondered whether it was due to her colour. Unabashed, she placed an advertisement in the newspapers announcing her arrival and, self-funded, set sail for the Crimea. Choosing a location en route to the front, she hired local builders to construct her ‘British Hotel’, from which she dispensed provisions, herbal remedies, medical equipment and care to the soldiers. After the war, Mary was awarded several medals for bravery. Until her death in 1881, she divided her time between England and Iamaica. In 2004 Mary Seacole was voted the Greatest Black Briton of all time. True False 1 During The Crimean War Mary Seacole was known as the ‘Lady with the Lamp’. 2 Mary Seacole didn’t know her father. 3 Mary Seacole had no formal medical qualifications. _ _ 4 Florence Nightingale refused to go to _ _ the front with Mary Seacole. _ 5 Mary Seacole felt discriminated against. 6Thegovernmentsubsidisedthe‘British _ _ Hotel’. 7 Mary Seacole‘s efforts were appreciated in Britain. MATURA_ Struktura egzaminu 0 Elementy wiedzy o kraiach anglojezycznych - Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Pmwda/ Faisz
  14. 14. THIS UNITINCLUDES ‘ V _ Vocabulary 0 money and finance 0 renting properties ‘ 1" g , , X‘ . - Grammar 0 Determiners (articles and quantifiers) 0 Verb patterns I Causatives 7 7 ‘ 7 7 ' Speaking - buying and selling a flat 0 a discussion of consumerism : ‘1l§lIH: Vl§'i' mix-» xll;1Il1t‘IIt‘lt; ll “ : ; Value and price 2 Look at the photos. Which items do you think are worth a lot of money? Which might be worth a lot to the owner but not worth much money? i m. ;;; :.; m; 171,122:/ m Ti Przeczytai opcje (A—F). zanim wysluchasz nagrania izastanéw sie nad ich znaczeniem. Pamietai, ie w nagraniu nie uslyszysz identycznych slow. (3 1.06 Read the listening tip. Then listen and match the speakers (1-5) with their opinions (A—F). There is one opinion that you do not need. Speaker 1 : ] Speaker 3 Speaker 2 '- Speaker 5 SPEBKEF4 A You value things more ifthey were a present from somebody you love. 8 You value things more if other people really like them. C You always value things more if you’ve owned them for a long time. D You value things that say something about who you are. E The most precious things are the ones that you couldn’t replace. F Things that you have had to wait for are always worth more to you. MATURA Zakupyi uslugi - Rozumienie ze sluchu Dobieranie 3 9 1.06 Complete the sentences with the words in the box. Then listen again and check. Money and finance bargain credit debt financial fortune overpriced precious priceless profit well-off worthless It didn’t cost a It doesn't contain a stone, like a diamond. Some people say that Apple products are I don’t like using cards. I hate the idea of being in It was a real . Ifl sold it now, I’d make a big My parents weren't In terms, they’re 10 Memories are (XJlOU'I-l—‘U)l~JI— O 5| Complete the sentences with a word formed from the key word in capitals. You can use a dictionary to help. 1 Small cars are more than large cars. (ECONOMY) 2 Employees work longer hours in return for higher (EARN) 3 Not buying holiday insurance was a (COST) 4 The fact that they never returned the money I’d lent them taught me a lesson. (VALUE) 5 The family donated halftheir fortune to various causes. (WORTH) 6 The hotel is beautiful, but the rooms are vew (PRICE) 7 The EU has helped to bring (ECONOMY) 8 The restaurant closed after a month because it wasn’t T . (PROFIT) mistake. stability to the region. EFEEKE Say which ofthe opinions in exercise 2 you agree or disagree with. Give your own reasons. Work in pairs. Discuss the questions. 1 Which ofyour possessions is worth the most money? 2 Which ofyour possessions is worth the most to you personally, and why? Vocabulary Builder 2.1: Expressions connected with money: p. 132 Unit2~Forwhatit’sworth 15
  15. 15. GRAMMAR Determiners 1 Do you agree or disagree with the following English saying? Give reasons. ‘Money can't buy happiness. ’ 2 Q 1.07 Choose the correct articles to complete the text. Then listen and check. Are friends and family priceless? They say that you can’t put a price on 1the / — true friendship. However, 2a / the recent study claims that seeing your friends and family every day is worth the same as an £85,000 increase in salary. 3A / The study, which was published in ‘the / — Journal of Socio—Economics, took information from 8,000 households across 5the / — Britain. On average, 6a / the person with an annual salary of £10,000 who had a lot of face—to—face contact with friends and family was as happy as one earning £95,000 7a / the year who hardly ever saw friends or relatives. So 8the / — rich are not necessarily happier than the rest of us, unless they also have good personal relationships in their life. 3 Study the answers to exercise 2, then complete the rules with a/ an, the or — (no article). Check all the rules in the Grammar Builder on page 116. a We often use when we mention something for the first time, but when we mention it again. b We use when there is only one of something. c We use for continents and most countries. d We use when we make a generalisation. e We use when we mean ‘any example of something’. f We sometimes use to mean ‘per-, for each’. g We can use with an adjective to refer to everybody who has that characteristic. no Grammar Builder 2.1: Determiners: Articles: p.116 Determiners Determiners come before a noun. They include articles (a, an and the) and quantiflers such as: all, both, many, each, every, several, some, few, no, etc. Most quantiflers can be followed by ofin expressions such as most 0/‘, a few 0)‘, several of: Most of his friends are boys. A few of them are girls. However, no and every cannot be followed by of; instead, we say none ofand everyone of: $he’s tried on every one of the dresses in this shop, but none of them fits her. 16 ' Unit2-Forwhatit’sworth I can an a’c/ triitlitcm /5 . lL; cribc t, m.*11fitic. r. Tr: up , O! Grammar Builder 2.1: Determiners: Quantifiers: p. 117 14 c 1 U'I-l>o)l) omplete the sentences with ofor leave them blank. Some __ people can be really annoying. None __ his family is rich. Most __ footballers are very well paid. Many_ my relatives live abroad. Read each g question carefully before you write your answer. l could find several _ these words in the dictionary. @ We use few/ little instead ofa few/ a little to emphasise the smallness of the number or quantity. Compare: The art business is going quite well. I’ve sold a few paintings and made a little money. The art business is going badly. I’ve sold few paintings and made little money. 5 Read the information about determiners on pages 116-117. Then choose the correct determiner to complete the sentences. 1 6N 9 3 (D fl_O 0' Although all / both parents work, either/ neither parent earns much / many money. She decided to look for another / otherjob, although there were few / little opportunities in her home town. She saves all / each ofthe money she earns; she doesn’t spend any / some ofit. When my aunt started gambling, she lost all / most of her money within a few / a little years. umber the expressions of quantity from 1-9, 1= the most, = the least. a few of/ a little of f none of : all of g nearly all of — hardly any of : h some of i_ many/ many of _ i very few/ little of _ most of 7 Workin pairs. Find out this information about your partner. Use expressions from exercise Sin your a 1 OU1-bu-llJ nswers. how many classmates he/ she sees at weekends how much money he/ she spends on snacks how many school subjects he/ she enjoys how much time in the evening is spent watchingTV how many of this year’s exams he/ she expects to pass how many friends share the same taste in music How many of your classmates do you see at weekends? I I see a few ofthem.
  16. 16. Property boom 1 Look at the photos of properties for rent. Match them with the headings in the box. a furnished studio apartment a period cottage a barn conversion a basement flat an unfurnished warehouse conversion 2 Complete the estate agent's descriptions of the properties in exercise 1 using the words in the box. block cable character detached garden lease mains open-plan pets top A Spacious, 1 four bedroom property in a beautiful rural location. Oil-fired central heating. (Note: there is no 2 or unfurnished from mid Sep. E l,200 p. c.m. gas. ) Available furnished B 0 ’Fiith-floor apartment In E‘/ Quaint and attractive property, modern 3 close full of 5 . Three bedrooms to all amenities. GCH and two reception rooms. Quiet, and 4 TV / phone village location but good bus / Internet. Available service to nearest town. GCH. immediately, n/ s only. £600 pcm, inc. council tax. week. No children or "’ — Dom - Rozumienie ze sluchu Prawda/ Falsz Available from early Oct. £250 per i (J11 rent’ .1 prcgicizjw in fire ll. ’<. 5. Stunning 7 Two bedrooms and 8 Contemporarg design. Rent includ floor apartment with views ofthe river. living room / dining room / kitchen. es sat TV and Internet. Gas central heating. Available immediatelg, unfurnished. £1,600 pcm. E ‘ Comfortable, two bedroom apartment with shared 9 Separate staircase. Available furnished or unfurnished for min 12-month ‘-° £800 pcm. , starting immediately. GCH. Strictly n/ s. 3 Q 1.08 Listen and check your answers to exercise 2. 1| Work in pairs. What do the following abbreviations mean? Sep. n/ s pcm inc. 5 9 1.09 Look at the photo GCH Oct. sat min of a very small flat. Then listen and find out the answers to these questions. 1 in which British city is the flat? 2 What is the total area ofthe flat in m2? 3 How much is the rent per _ . g week? 6 Q 1.09 Listen again. Are the sentences true or false? 1 The flat was originally a cupboard. 2 There is nowhere to sleep in the flat. 3 The previous tenant moved out after injuring herselfin the flat. 4 The current tenant likes the flat because it means that she doesn’t have to share. 5 The flat is probably worth about £300,000. 6 Few people have been willing to rent such a small flat. 7 Work in pairs. Prepare a role-play between an estate agent and a possible tenant of the smallest flat in Britain. A You are the tenant. Think about possible objections to living in such a tiny flat. Make notes. Where. could 1 put my clothes? B You are the estate agent. Think of positive things you could say about such a tiny flat. Make notes. it wnilldrf‘. tat? n‘: l:, l7 ianw to clean "*- 8 EHEEKE Role play your dialogue using your ideas from exercise 7. Unit2-Forwhatit’sworth l 17
  17. 17. 1 READING Down and out imagine that you had to give up doing one of these things. Which would you choose? which is the last one you would give up? using your mobile phone going outwith friends having clean clothes to wear buying snacks and drinks between meals using public transport U1-I-wNH Read the text, ignoring the gaps. According to the writer, which single aspect of poverty causes the most problems? a Not being able to eat in restaurants. b Not being able to buy new clothes. c Not being able to admit your lack of money. d Not being able to pay your rent. Wskaziwka mat: /m/ rm ‘ Kiedy dobierasz zdania do lukw tekscie, zwracaj uwage na to, co znajduje sie przed luka i po nie]. Szukai wyrazéw lub tematéw maiacych zwiazek z brakuiacymi zdaniami. Read the reading tip. Then look carefully at the words before and after each gap. Which gap might require a sentence that: a mentions milk? explains how something is different from expected? l: b c mentions a large quantity of food? d mentions the consequence of buying something that is more expensive than necessary? talks about mealtimes? l: talks about a girl cutting something? Cl -hm Match the sentences (A—G) with the gaps (1-6). There is one sentence that you do not need. Use your answers to exercise 3 to help you. A She is clumsy, and cuts more than a pound. B And then there are your meals — meals are the worst difficulty ofall. C She asks forthe rent, and you have to explain why you cannot pay it. D You thought it would be quite simple; it is extraordinarily complicated. E A snivelling self-pity comes over you at the sight of so much food. This wastes you a franc a day. G There is nothing for it but to throw the milk away and go foodless. ‘H 18 Unit 2 - Forwhat it’s worth I / an £tl'l£’r/ t‘V‘. l]‘. "FT¢'( tutu. ’ rtnci fa . ’ ll. /t‘t'av'y t’rirJ. ./f . rLm‘. ~.. ’ r‘0tt'r1’’. An excerpt from Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell It is altogether curious, your first Contact with poverty. You have thought so much about poverty — it is the thing you have feared all your life, the thing you knew would happen to you sooner or later; and it is all so utterly and prosaicallyd different. 1 You discover, for instance, the secrecy attaching to poverty. At a sudden stroke you have been reduced to an income of six francsz a day. But of course you dare not admit it — you have got to pretend that you are living quite as usual. From the start it tangles you in a net oflies, and even with the lies you can hardly manage it. You stop sending clothes to the laundry, and the laundress catches you in the street and asks you why; you mumble something, and she, thinking you are sending the clothes elsewhere, is your enemy for life. The tobacconist keeps asking why you have cut down your smoking. There are letters you want to answer, and cannot, because stamps are too expensive. 2 Every day at niealtimes you go out, ostensibly} to a restaurant, and loaf an hour in the Luxembourg Gardens, watching the pigeons. Afterwards you smuggle your food home in your pockets. Your food is bread and margarine, or bread and wine, and even the nature of the food is governed by lies. You have to buy rye“ bread instead of household bread, because the rye loaves, though dearer, are round and can be smuggled in your pockets. 3 Sometimes, to keep up appearances, you have to spend sixty centimes on a drink, and go correspondingly short of food. Your linens gets filthy, and you run o11t of soap and razor blades. Your hair wants cutting, and you my to cut it yourself, with such fearful results that you have to go to the barber after all, and spend the equivalent of a day’s food. All day you are telling lies, and expensive lies. You discover the extreme precariousness of your six francs a day. Mean disasters happen and rob you of food. You have spent your last eighty centimes on halfa litre of milk, and are boiling it over the spirit lamps. While it boils a bug runs down your forearm; you give the bug a flick with your nail. and it falls, plop! straight into the milk. 4 You go to the baker's to buy a pound of bread, and you wait while the girl cuts a pound for another customer. 5 ‘Pardon, monsieur, ’ she says, ‘I suppose you don’t - Kultura - Pafistwo i spoletzefistwo 0 Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dabieranie
  18. 18. mind paying two sous7 extra? ’ Bread is a franc a pound, and you have exactly a franc. / Vhen you think that you too might be asked to pay two sous extra, and would have to confess that you could not, you bolt5 in panic. It is hours before you dare venture into a baker’s shop again. You go to the greengrocer’s to spend a franc on a kilogram of potatoes. But one of the pieces that make up the franc is a Belgian piece, and the shoprnan refuses it. You slink? out of the shop, and can never go there again. You discover what it is like to be hungry. With bread and margarine in your belly, you go out and look into the shop windows. Everywhere there is food insulting you in huge, wasteful piles; whole dead pigs, baskets of hot loaves, great yellow blocks of butter, strings of sausages, mountains of potatoes. 6 You plan to grab a loaf and run, swallowing it before they catch you; and you refrain, from pure funkm. This — one could describe it further, but it is all in the same style — is life on six francs a day. Thousands of people in Paris live it - struggling artists and students, out-of-work people of all kinds. It is the suburbs, as it were, of poverty. Glossary prosalcally = in an ordinary, everyday way francs = old French currency (1 franc = 100 centimes) ostensibly = apparently; on the surface rye = a type of grain, like wheat linen = the sheets on a bed spirit lamp = a small lamp with a flame which can be used for cooking sous = colloquial word for old French currency (1 sou = 5 centimes) bolt = to run away slirik = to move silently and secretively funk = fear (an old, informal word) $(D{1J‘lO’Jl'J'| -S: -0~ll3—A 5 Find words in the text for: a woman who washes clothes a person who sells tobacco a person who cuts men's hair a person who makes and/ or sells bread a person who sells vegetables U‘! -l—‘U0l)I—‘ 6 Choose the best word to sum up how poverty made the author feel. Find evidence in the text. angry ashamed confused frightened unattractive 7 EHHKEG Orwell experienced poverty mostly by choice, as an experiment. Give your own ideas about: 1 why he chose to do it. 2 what he probably learned from it. 3 whetheryou personally would be prepared to do it. 8 SPEAKING Read the statement below. Divide the class into two groups. One group is going to argue in favour ofthe statement and the other group against. ‘The government should give money to everybody who does not have enough for day-to-day expenses. ’ Work in pairs with someone from your group. Think of arguments to support your position. Use the phrases below to help you. Expressing arguments First of all Anotherthing is that One advantage/ disadvantage of. .. is that There are strong arguments in favour of/ against lfwe . .., then I’m convinced that Giving examples For example, To give you an example: Disagreelng I’m afraid I disagree. I take your point, but I don’t think that’s true/ right. I don’t accept that. You're missing the point. 9 SPEAKING Debate the statement in exercise 8. Support your group’s position with as many arguments as possible. no Vocabulary Builder 2.2: Non-metric measures: p.132 Unit 2 - For what it’s worth ( 19
  19. 19. §“£‘l’i. lr7‘l-‘VA -£:5~ Verb patterns/ ~ 4. F: 1 Read the text. What is unusual about the restaurant that it describes? T-Io_w much 15 1t worth? imagine going out for dinner with some friends and not getting a bill at the end of the meal. In one restaurant in North London, Just Around The . . Corner, that is exactly what =1 , happens. Instead, the L ’ ' restaurant allows customers V to decide how much they feel like paying. It sounds » like a recipe for disaster, ~* as ~= -~ but in tact, it‘seen‘ts‘ to be very successful. Most people ‘expect to pay a fair price when they have a good meal cooked for them. Occasionally, when customers suggest paying a very small amount of money, the restaurant’s owner Michael Vasos, refuses to accept it. This usually makes the costumers realise that, if they want to come back, they really should pay more. Just Around The Corner is proving so popular that three other restaurants in North London are considering copying the idea. Mju, which serves contemporary European cuisine, decided to try it for one month, although they only letcustomers pay for food in this way — drinks had fixed prices. 2 EFEKEE Do you think restaurants like the ones in the text are a good idea? Why? / Why not? 3 Look at the verbs highlighted in the text and the words which follow them. Then add the highlighted verbs to the table below. I """""""""""""""""" " IL ‘I-. i:i~gMi‘(-arty 1 verb + -ing form avoid, enjoy, imagine, 2 verb + infinitive agree, promise, T, T, T, T T 3 verb + object + infinitive force, persuade, inspire, 4 verb + object + base form (infinitive without to) help, 5 verb + object + past participle get, 20 ) Unit 2 - Forwhat it's worth 1} Complete the sentences with the infinitive, base form, past participle or -ing form ofthe verbs in brackets. 1 My sister avoids (go) to parties because she can’t stand (talk) to strangers. 2 I had originally decided (work) abroad, but your advice made me (change) my mind. 3 I persuaded my aunt (visit) Florence because she really enjoys (look) at beautiful buildings. 4 lfyou let me (borrow) your laptop, I promise (give) it backthis evening. 5 She had her old phone (repair), even though she expected (get) a new one. 4 " W’. ~ I : _|tI3’r“‘*‘u1_ A few verbs change their meaning depending on whether they are followed by an infinitive or an -ing form. Compare: I stopped talking. (= I became silent. ) Turning the corner, I stopped to talkto my friend. (= / stopped walking and starting talking. ) 5 Read the Look out! box. Then complete one sentence in each pair with the infinitive of the verb in brackets and the other with the -ing form. 1 a You must remember (visit) Jack. You spent a whole week there! b You must remember (visit) Jack. He’d love to see you again. 2 a She tried (open) the window, but it was stuck. b She tried (open) the window, but it didn't make the room any cooler. 3 a Afterfinishing a degree in English, she went on (study) Law at Harvard. b After finishing a degree in Law at Oxford, she went on (study) Law at Harvard. 4 a She stopped (say) hello to her neighbour. They never speak at all now. b She stopped (say) hello to her neighbour. They chatted for a while. 6 Complete the text with a suitable form of have, make, let or allow. I remember having a big argument with my father when I refused 1 my hair cut. For two weeks, he wouldn’t 2 me to go out! He said that I would 3 the whole family look bad. After two weeks, he '’ me leave the house, but only if I was wearing a hat. I thought it was really unfair, because he didn't complain when my sister 5 her hair dyed and he also 6 her to 7 her nose pierced! 7 Work in pairs. Talk about how your life was different ten years ago. Think of things that: 1 you used to have done foryou. 2 you weren't allowed to do. 3 people used to make you do. Grammar Builder 2.2: Verb patterns: p.118
  20. 20. 'flv. t - can prcrcitt flu prcr a. i1ri'wiir 1 I o a cf .1 . «.'t. '.tcnisi: Z in .1 a'ir(: t.rJi: i1. DISC uss I on 1 Look at the photo, graph and newspaper story. Explain 2 9 1.10 Listen to three students answeringthe question what each one tells us about money and consumerism. below. Who gives the best answer in your opinion? Explain your choice. _ ‘what at some of In pros and cons Three die In stampede of living in a consumerist society? ’ at Ikea store Opening Kiedy odpowiadasz na pytanie, staraj sie unikac’ dlugich _ 1k 3 Store chwil milczenia. Naucz sie kilku wyraiefi i zwrotéw, A Stampede Of hundTed5 OT Sh0tl3P: Y5 3‘ an 1 edead ktérych uiyjesz, zastanawiajac sie nad odpowiedzia. in western Saudi Arabia has le t t ree P90!“ 6 - - ' ' d hen and many more injured. The incident occurre I W shoppers crowded into a branch of [kea to claim a , _ - r ffer hmrted number of credit vouchers that were on o 3 9 1.10 Read the speaking tip. Then listen again and complete the phrases the students use while they are thinking what to say. to the public More than 8.000 P€°PlC had gathered near the store in order to get the $150 V011ChCT5- That’s an interesting else? Let me . Well, it’s difficult to , really. What disadvantages? Well, I’ve never really thought about it OL. n-I—uJNr-x 4- Look at the phrases for presenting pros and cons. Add the phrases in the box to the correct groups. One disadvantage of is (that). .. Another drawback is (that). .. is not a good idea because. .. One positive aspect of is (that). .. The main benefit of is is generally a good thing because Cons On the other hand, As for the disadvantages, 5 Think of pros and cons for the question in exercise 2. Make notes, using the phrases below and your own ideas. crimerates debt recreation rich—poordivide living standards range of products waste and pollution advertising exploitation ofworkers enterprising spirit greed 6 EHEEKE Work in pairs. Discuss the question in exercise 2. Use your notes from exercise 5 and phrases from exercises 3 and 4. — Pafistwo I spoleczefistwo 0 Méwienie Rozmowa no podstawie materiaiu stymulujqcego Unit 2 ° For what it’s worth { 21
  21. 21. J Elm Work in pairs. Say whether you agree or disagree with each of the points. 1 Society often judges people according to how much money they have, so money equals status. 2 Rich people are not always happy. 3 You can’t be happy ifyou can’t even afford food and clothing. 4 Rich people often find it harderto make genuine friends. 5 Money is becoming more and more important in today’s capitalist society. 6 Relationships with people produce more happiness than money. 7 Havingtoo much money can lead to boredom because there are no challenges in your life. 8 Worries about money are a cause of unhappiness. Read the essay. In which paragraph (A—D) does the writer: 1 sum up his own opinion? 2 put forward arguments against the statement in the title? 3 put forward arguments in favour of the statement? 4 rephrase the statement to show that he understands the main issue? Money can buy happiness. Discuss. A In most parts of the developed world, people are better off financially today than they were fifty years ago. But are they happier? Has more affluence led to more contentment? This is the question we need to answer. B It is hard to deny that money is necessary in today’s world. It is very difficult to be happy if you do not have enough money for essential things like food and clothing. For the poorest people in our society, more money would certainly improve their lives. To that extent, it's true that money can buy happiness for some individuals. Even people who are not particularly poor, but are not rich either, often have concerns about money. It seems clear that extra money would remove these worries and the distress that they cause. C On the other hand, money is not the main source of happiness for most people. They regard personal relationships as more important. For example, if you are feeling miserable about a friendship that has ended, money is irrelevant. What is more, if money really could buy happiness, the rich would be the happiest people in the world. Judging by the stories about them in magazines and on TV, they do not appear to be. D To sum up, I would say that money can improve the condition of people who do not have enough cash to live comfortably. However, money alone is not enough to bring happiness; you also need good relationships. 242 words 22 ) Unit2 - Forwhat it’s worth Which four points from exercise 1 are mentioned in paragraphs B and C of the essay? Write the numbers in the table. Which point is followed by an example? Look at the four points from exercise 1 which are not in the essay. Which paragraph could they belong to? Add them to the chart above. Include an example for one of the points. Complete the useful phrases from the essay. 1 It is hard to that 2 To that , it'struethat 3 Itseems that 4 Onthe other , ... 5 What is 6 To up, | saythat Vocabulary Builder 2.3: Expressing contrast: p.133 Choose two points from exercise 1 which are not in the essay. Rewrite them, one after the other, using two appropriate phrases from exercise 5. Do you agree with the conclusion of the essay? Why? / Why V it ~ _ . ., . '~~ ’ / ‘K’ . ’ . , . ’- , .-u- . 4 N v " VMATURA Pafistwo i spoleczefistwo 0 Czlowiek 0 Wypowiedi pisemna Rozprawka
  22. 22. Essay: for and against 1 Work in pairs. You are going to write an essay called: The best things in life are free. Think of points that you could include, and write as many as possible under the two headings. Points in favour (supporting the statement) Points against (giving the other side ofthe argument) 2 Choose the best two or three points from each group in exercise 1. Use them to complete paragraphs 2 and 3 in this essay plan. Paragraph1 Introduction Introduce the topic. Show that you understand the title ofthe essay and what it needs to cover. Paragraph 2 Points in favour 1 2 3 Paragraph 3 Points against 1 2 3 Paragraphzt Conclusion Sum up yourown opinion. 3 Think about the introduction to your essay and how to show that you understand the main issue. Decide: 0 what kinds ofthings are free. 0 what kinds ofthings are expensive. 0 what question you need to answer in the essay (but in your own words, without copying the title). 1'0 Write the introduction using your ideas from exercise 3. There is a saying that the best things in life are free. its certainly true that . - Panstwo i spoleczefistwo - Czlowiek - Wypowiedi pisemna Razprawka I am prcrcitz‘ iltc €iVt{ltiiic‘lifJ / or .1m{. rz; ttii1Jr in wt trm‘/ 5 Write the second and third paragraphs of your essay using your plan from exercise 2. include some ofthese useful phrases or phrases from exercise 5 on page 22. Presenting one side of the argument Firstly, it’s important to state that On the one hand, It is sometimes argued that Moreover, / Furthermore, Presenting the other side of the argument However, On the other hand, Some people take the opposite view, and claim/ maintain that Moreover, / Furthermore, Decide what your own opinion is. Do you agree or disagree with the statement in the title? Discuss it with your partner. Write the final paragraph ofyour essay using your ideas from exercise 6. On balance, While its true that l firmly believe that 8 You have now written a first draft. Count the words. Have you written between 200 and 250? if you are short of words, do one or more ofthese things. - Add more arguments to paragraphs 2 and/ or 3. 0 Give more examples to support the arguments in paragraphs 2 and 3. If you have written too many words, do one or more of these things: 0 Look for unnecessary repetition. 0 Look for words or sentences that you can cut without spoiling the ‘flow’ of the arguments. 0 Cut one or more examples that support the arguments. 9 Check your essay using the checklist below. Have you El followed the paragraph plan in exercise 2? [: l used some of the useful phrases in exercise 5 and in exercise 5 on page 22? D checked the spelling and grammar? 10 Now write a final copy of your essay. Unit 2 - Forwhat it’s worth y 23
  23. 23. §. ..t%. E<= .i5;. .;fi§. sE, ¥§t@E i: w . 1-2. Vocabulary 1 Complete the definitions with the words in the box. argumentative cheerful courteous dependable level-headed modest outgoing tight-fisted Somebody who hates spending moi. ey is Somebody who never acts without thinking is Somebody who is usually in a good mood is Somebody who you can rely on is ___. Somebody who enjoys meeting other people is U'I-Dullxlt- Somebody who often has disagreements with people is O 7 Somebody who never boasts is 8 Somebody who is polite to people is 2 Complete the words with the correct endings. 1 This vase is three thousand years old and absolutely price 2 Many people blame the government’s econom policies for the current crisis. 3 He tried to earn a living selling paintings, but it wasn’t profitj“ 4 This work of art is actually a fake — it's completely worth . 5 Sending her children to private schools was very cost_. 6 Everybody has to pay income tax on their earn 7 Having showers is more econom 8 The bank offers free financ customers. advice to all its 3 Complete the words in the description of a property for rent. Available to rent immediately for a four-month i only. This modern property, which has gas c heating, benefits from a convenient I close to the town centre. It is fully f in a contemporary style with new kitchen. The rent is £1,200 per c month, l-‘HUS bl”5- Zli ) Language Review1—2 than having baths. Grammar 4 Find and correct ten mistakes with tenses in this story. Madame Loisel was a beautiful young lady whose husband worked in the ministry of public information. One day, she was receiving an invitation to a party. Determined not to look less we| |~off than the other guests, Madame Loisel has borrowed a diamond necklace from her friend, Jeanne Forestier. The two women have been attending the same school as children, but Madame Forestler had later married a very rich man. Madame Louisel enjoyed the party, but at the end of the evening, she realised that she lost the precious necklace that she wore! So she and her husband borrowed a fortune in order to buy an identical replacement. They have given this replacement to Madame Forestier and said nothing about the loss. In order to save money, Madame Loisel and her husband lived in poverty. After ten years, Madame Loisel eventually was mentioning the loss ofthe necklace to her friend, and admits that she and her husband were working extra hours for years to pay offthe loan. Her friend had been shocked because the original necklace had been a worthless imitation, Circle the word or words which can correctly complete the sentences. 1 I spend of my money on clothes. all many some 2 My grandfather left £1,000 to __ of his grandchildren. all each every 3 The driver broke legs in the accident. either both each 4 I applied fortwo jobs, but I didn’t get ofthem. either neither every 5 We've made money since starting our own business. a little little a few K? Choose the correct verb form. 1 Before you leave home, please remember turning off/ to turn off the lights. 2 Your room looks great since you had the walls painting / painted. 3 Luke earns a lot. but they make him work / to work hard for his money. 4 The government is trying to encourage people save / to save money.
  24. 24. ;*? 'sr£ri. L;s. .- to. -. . l . -. .1-2. Reading Speaking 3 Work in pairs. What would be the main advantages and disadvantages oftaking part in the Erasmus programme? Use the ideas in the box to help you. 1 Quickly read texts 1 and 2, ignoring the gaps. Match the texts with two of the headings (A—D). A A personal experience of the Erasmus programme B How to apply fora place on the Erasmus programme C A general introduction to the Erasmus programme D The advantages and disadvantages ofthe Erasmus / programme 11 separation from family and friends new friends independence loneliness language barrier language skills culturalexperience - The Erasmus programme was launched in June 1987 by the Listening European Commission, and 3,244 students participated in its first academic year. 1 The programme encourages student and teacher mobility, and promotes co-operation among universities across Europe. The scheme currently covers nine out of every ten European higher education - establishments. It was named after Erasmus of Rotterdam (1466-1536), who was a Dutch humanist and theologian. 2 Sarah Bussell Country: Sweden Home: University of Newcastle Host: Siidertiirns Hiigskola Subject: History Approaching the final year of university, I felt I'd missed out on the opportunity to travel during a ’gap year’ and saw the Erasmus programme as a chance to rectify this. Stiderttirns was the natural choice for me, as a result of my limited grasp of European languages, as lectures were given in English. 2 Through working in the weekly student pub ‘Alfreds’ I learned most of the words needed to survive student life. 3 I don't think I fully appreciated how different student experiences throughout Europe were until I got involved in the Erasmus scheme. I feell have gained a real insight into Swedish student culture and life in Sweden in general. I have also made what ll 9 1.11 Alina, an Erasmus student from Poland, has just arrived at the University of Liverpool. Listen and find out her main reason forvisiting the Student Union. I hope will be life-long friends. ‘ Finally I can say with all certainty my semester in Sweden has entirely changed my ideas about Britain's position in Europe. Before I went away I never felt ‘European’, but now I realise that we have much more in common than you might think. So if you have the chance and you are prepared for a challenge, go for it! 5 T 2 Match the sentences (A—F) with the gaps (1-5). There is one sentence that you do not need. A However, the scheme is still popular with students in many different European countries. B However, I soon found that in orderto getthe full benefit of living in Sweden some knowledge of the language was required. I did and I'll neverforget it. Now, more than 150,000 people take part each year. I look forward to reminiscing with them about my Erasmus experience foryears to come. F Weekly language lessons expanded my vocabularytoo. "'| Ut' a To get details of accommodation. b To find out about clubs and leisure activities. c To get a timetable of lectures and classes. d To pay the tuition fees for her course. 91.11 ' Listen again. Are the sentences true or false? 1 The Student Union is on the ground floor. 2 Paddy and Alina are studying the same subject. 3 Paddy’s parents paid his university tuition fees. 4 Paddy knows that there's a women’s basketball team. 5 There are four people living in Alina‘s house. 6 Mary is surprised that Alina and Paddy know each other. Writing 6 Imagine you are Alina. Write an account of the events in the Student Union and your home. Use your answers to exercise 5 as a reminder. Skills Round-up 1-2 25
  25. 25. 1 Getreadyto LISTEN Work in pairs. Tell your partner about an occasion when you lost or found some money. 5 This must be a mistake. I'm sure you didn’t pay £25 for a cup of coffee. 2 _ Do the Matura exam task This must be a mistake. You can’t 6 Love and friendship are more Important than money. zAnAm5 MA1'uRA| _NE _ Rozumlgmg zg $f; u(| -|[_| MOVIE‘! T: 35 IOV9 and fIlel'ld5hlP- Zapoznai sie 2 treécia zadania. Uslvszysz dwukrotnie 5 Get read to SPEAK Work in pairs. Make a list of various CZIEIY kfétkie lnf0TmaCl9- PiZYP°TZ5ldkUl kaidel Z “ich ways of getting money and discuss how effective they are. naglowek podsumowujacy jej tresé (A—F). Dwa naglowki zostaiy podane dodatkowo. Za kaida poprawna odpowiedi 5 Do the Matura exam task, otrzymasz 1 punkt. ZADANIE MATURALNE - Mowramra A Fortune on the doorstep B A film With 3 haDi3V ending Rozmowa na podstawie materiaiu stymulujacego C Hunt forthe heir D A well-deserved win E Sleeping on a bed of riches F Thefortune hunter Przeanalizuj przedstawiony material. Przygotui sie do iego prezentacii i rozmowy 2 egzaminujacym na temat: 0 roinych sposobéw zdobywania pieniedzy, - znaczenia pieniedzy w iyciu. 3 59* '€3dV'°'’U5E0’ENGU5H Look at the sentences below. Which two mean the same? 1 This is the most expensive present I’ve evergot. 2 I’ve nevergot such an expensive present. 3 it’s such an expensive present that I feel embarrassed. 4 Do the Matura exam task. ZADANIE MATLIRALNE - STOSOWANIE smuxrun ' I ' LEKSYKALNO-GRAMATYCZNYCH Drivers wanted. Excellent Nursefy Teacher peg and condition Wins Jackpot _ V Pamietaj, ie sparafrazowane zdanie powinno moiliwie najdokiadniej zachowaé znaczenie zdania wyisciowego. _ What people value most In life When i was young Uzupelnij kaide z niedokoficzonych zdan tak, aby zachowac’ financial _ znaczenie zdania wyisciowego. Wymagana jest pelna “C5955 | Used to thmk that poprawnosé ortograficzna wpisywanych fragmentow zdari. money was the Za kaida poprawna odpowiedi otrzymasz o,5 punktu. most important thing in life. Now 1 Ms Grant had four husbands. They were not millionaires. / that I am old, Ms Grant had four husbands but_n_? job | know it is_ 3 m”“0”3lie- satisfaction Oscar Wilde 2 Until now, Sheila has neverwon the lottery. love - » | t’s . the lottery. 3 Robert said he wouldn’t lend me £500. 1 Describe the material in relation to the main topic. Robert refused me: £500. 2 How would you compare the different ways of getting 4 lfyou go on investing your money so unwisely, you'll soon moneythat are presented? go bankrupt. 3 What conclusions would you draw from the pie chart? Unless you (T? go bankrupt. 4 Do you agree with Oscar Wilde's words? Why? / Why not? 5 In what situations do you think money is the most important thing to have? Why? ’ - Czlowiek - Rozumienie ze sluchu Dobieranie - Stosowanie struktur leksykalno-gramatycznych Transfarmacje 26 Get ready ml’ Matura 2 I Méwienie Razmawa na podstawie materiaiu styrrrulu/ ‘qcega
  26. 26. THIS UNIT INCLUDES r Vocabulary 0 stages of life - colloquial language - phrasal verbs - phrases used in presentations I describing personality and appearance Grammar - Talking aboutthe future I Future continuous, future perfect and future perfect continuous Speaking 0 giving a presentation - describing a relative - talking about plans - talking about the problems old people face 0 talking about the generation gap ‘ -22 Stages of life /3 / i 1 Put the stages of life in the order that we reach them. a childhood D d adulthood = b old age I: e middle age _ c adolescence E f infancy 2 Match the people in the box with the stages of life. adolescent baby child theelderly teenager toddler youngman/ woman OAP kid youth 3 Complete the text with words from the box. Use the correct form ofthe verbs. be-been be brought up be buried change gain get married grow up leave move pass away retire settle down start thirties toddler My graudad, Harry Ellis, 1MLmrL iu Laudou iu (915. His ather died while he was still! a 2 , so he by my great-grafldmather. wheu Harrtgawas «Five the10~ 4 house aud tram that time 5 iu the aauutrfi. He 6 school at the age a«F «Faurteeu, without au guailit-‘ieatiaus, aud got a Job 044 a tarm. lie tell? iu love with Shirley, the tarmer’s daughter, aud atter a short emaragemeut they 5 . when they; had saved up euauah m0’ne‘5— to buy a small! house, theta 9 aud 1° a -Famillta. wheu l-larr1O> was iu his “ tamiltd moved to Mauehester aud l—larr 12 He went to work iu a car tactarv aud stayed there until! he was so, when he 13 . Sadlla, he 1‘ East ear aud 15 iu the graveyard at the church 3 t’ t he Jobs. where he aud Shirllev got married. MATURA Zycie rodzinrle i towarzyskie 0 Rozumienie ze sluchu Wieiokrotny wyblir ll 9 1.13 Listen to Gwen Jones talking to Gareth, her grandson, about her life. Choose the correct answers. 1 Gareth didn’t meet his great uncles because a they all died. b two died and one went to live abroad. c Gwen lost touch with them. d they went to live abroad. 2 Life was tough for Auntie Lynn because a she didn’t have a family ofher own. b hersister died. c she had to bring up her sister’s children without much help. d Gwen’s dad didn’t earn much money. 3 Gwen was teased at school because a herclothes didn’t fit her properly. b she was top of her class. c she mended her own clothes. d she only got new clothes once a year. 4 Gwen regrets that a she wasn’t happy at school. b kids are unkind to one another. c young people don’t understand the importance of education. d she didn’t stay longer at school. 5 Where did Gwen’s husband work when they first met? a In a butcher’s shop. b In Woolworth’s. c In a clothes shop. d He didn’t have a job. Think about the life of a relative of yours. Make notes under some or all ofthese headings. infancy and childhood (home? where? school? ) adolescence adulthood (career? marriage? family? ) middle age (change ofjobs? move home? ) old age (retire? ) U'I-I-‘UJllI—| 6 Work in pairs. Speak for about 90 seconds about the life ofthe person in exercise 5. V Vocabulary Builder 3.1: Phrasal verbs with up and down p.133 Unit 3 - From cradle to grave 27
  27. 27. .~ I " = .1.<. t=ufurett. . I J Talking about the future] 1 Choose the best tense. Then match each example to a rule. 1 ‘I'm offto the shops now. ’ ‘Really? I'll / |’m goingto come with you. ’ 2 I feel awful. I’ll / I'm going to be sick. 3 What time does Ben's flight / is Ben's flight going to arrive on Saturday? 4 I’ve already planned my next holiday. I'll / I'm going to visit Paris. What do you do / are you doing tomorrow morning? 6 Iwon’t tell / I'm not telling anybody that you're here, I promise. 7 I'm sure I'll pass / I'm passing all my exams. U1 There are various ways of talking about the future in English. Which one we choose depends on the context. a We use will for facts and predictions. b We use will for instant decisions. c We use will for offers and promises. d We use going to for things we have already decided to do. e We use going to for predictions based on what we know or can see. f We use the present continuous for arrangements. g We use the present simple for events that are scheduled or timetabled. 2 Q 1.14 Listen to people talking about the future. Complete the sentences with the correct future forms. vvu-uv-~vv-numru-— vs on Friday evening. It o’clock. 2 Marion at university. Her years. 3 Jane this weekend. lfshe gets back in time she Keith. 4 Steve and Andrea . If it's a boy they Max. If it's a girl they Sarah. Grammar Builder 3.1: Talking about the future: p. 119 28 ) Unit 3 - From cradle to grave ’. ( r I I tic ‘ l 3;‘ Time clauses 1 In time clauses we normally use the present simple after if, in case, unless, when, before, after, as soon as, by the time and until to talk about the future. ' 3' We don't use will. Letme know as soon as he arrives. I'll finish my homework when Iget to school. 2 We sometimes use the present perfect to indicate the completion of an action. We'll go as soon as we've had lunch. I'll give you your CD back after I've listened to it. Complete the sentences. Use the present simple or present perfect. (Sometimes both are possible. ) apologise blow drink finish pack rain read see I won’t speak to him unless he to me for being so rude. I'll phone you as soon as the meeting The train will depart after the guard his whistle. I'm not goingto bed until I this cup of tea. 1 2 3 4 5 lfyou Rob, tell him I'm looking for him. 6 7 8 We can go when you your suitcase. Take an umbrella in case it . this letter, I will be in France. By thetime you Complete the second sentences so that the meaning is the same as the first. Use the word in capitals and the present simple or present perfect in the time clause. 1 We won't play tennis if it isn't sunny tomorrow. UNLESS We won’t tomorrow. 2 I'll let you stay out late when you are sixteen. UNTIL I won't — sixteen. 3 I'll take the photo, then I'll give you your camera back. AS SOON AS I'll as the photo. 4 John will get home. then I'll cook dinner. AFTER I'll _: _j_ home. 5 I won't hang out the washing because it might rain. IN CASE I won’t as rains. 6 You can't leave the table until you've eaten everything. BEFORE You must ___j_the table. 7 I won’t buy you a cake if you don’t behave yourself. UNLESS I won’t ? ___yourself. 8 Think hard about it. Then decide what to do. UNTIL Don't decide __: :__ it. EFHEIIE Work in pairs. Giving as much detail as possible, talk about something that: you're doing this weekend. you’re going to do as soon as you have time. you'll probably do in the summer holidays. takes place in your town some time this year. you won't do until next year. you'll do before you go home this evening. OU'| J>UJl)I— Grammar Builder 3.2: Time clauses: p.119
  28. 28. ctlllrillila , In the recording studios in Abbey Road, London, it’s business as usuaI. The band members stamp and growl, and sing at the tops of their voices the famous song My Generation. Except thatThe Zimmers are not your average band. Thls group has 40 members, a lot of attitude, and a combined age of 3,000! The man growling angrily into the mike — reading glasses on and false teeth out — is the lead singer, 90-year-old Alfie Carretta. And crashing about on the keyboards and singing like a mad thing‘ is white-haired Winifred Warbuiton, 99. And the guy in the beard bashingithe drums is Buster Martin — at 101, he's the oldest working man in Britain. When their video was released on the Internet siteYouTube, it attracted more than two million hits in a fortnight. Since then they’ve had countless interview requests from the media in over 50 countries, including jetting _off to California to appear on the Tonight with Jay Leno Show alongside George Clooney. It all started with a project by BBC documentary makerTrm Samuels. ‘I set out to make a programme exploring how we treat old people in this country, ’ he says. ‘So many are dumped‘ in homes, stuck on their own, brushed under the carpet and marginalised. ’ So he visited shabby care homes and isolated tower blocks to find old people willing to join the band. l"rm said, ‘I wanted to give them a voice — and what better way than to get them in the pop charts? This would say: “They're old, but they're not past it. "' ForWinifred, Buster and Alfie, life will never be the same again. ‘The whole experience has brought me back to life, ’ exclaimed Alfie when I met him for tea and biscuits at his north London flat. ‘I was stuck in a rut and now I feel alive again. ’ MATURA Zycie rodzinne i towarzyskie - Méwienie Prezenrac/ ‘a tematu Look at the photo. What is unusual about the band The Zimmers? Read the text and answer the questions. 1 How many people are in the band? 2 How old is the drummer? 3 How many times has theirvideo been viewed on the Internet? 4 Why did Tim Samuels start the proiect? 5 What effect has it had on the lead singer? Match the highlighted colloquial phrases in the text with the definitions. 1 hitting 5 havinga boringlife that 2 flying doesn't change 3 too old 6 put (inacarelessway) 4 wildly 7 man 9 1.1 5 Listen to Molly, Roger and Tina talking about how elderly people’s lives could be improved. Who talks about: 1 what families should do? 2 what the state should do? 3 what communities should do? 9 1.15 Complete the sentences with the correct form ofthe verbs in the box. Then listen again and check. do grow increase move pay save take visit 1 They haven't managed to working lives. 2 The government should the pension. 3 Old people are often lonely because their children have up and away. 4 I think everyone in the community should attention to old people living nearby. 5 They should go and them every now and then. 6 Families should more responsibility for elderly relatives. 7 I don't think it's the government's problem, I think the relatives should more. much money duringtheir lTl0|’€ Work in pairs. How could elderly people’s lives be improved in Poland? Think about what (a) the government, (b) families and (c) the community should do. Use the ideas in the box to help you. health money pensions loneliness carehomes medicines transport ETEEKE Present your ideas to the class. Use the phrases in the box to structure your presentation. One problem old people face is The first thing I think we should do is Secondly, in my opinion the government should Finally, it would help if families (+ past tense) Unit 3 - From cradle to grave 29
  29. 29. , l I :1 gynnrgr re; _ lwork in pairs. Ask and answer the questions. 1 How often do you argue with your parents? 2 What sort ofthings do you argue about? Make a list, then compare it with other students’ lists. Read the text. Which sentence (a-d) best summarises the main idea? a Fathers are much better at dealing with teenagers than mothers because they understand them better. b If parents trusted teenagers more and were less controlling, then they would get on much better with them. c It's best not to tell your parents what you are doing because they will either get angry or worried. d Adults have a poor opinion ofteenagers, but they often behave badly themselves and set a bad example for their children. Choose the correct answers. 1 What happened when Ellie wanted a new pair ofshoes? a She asked her father nicely and he said yes. b Her mum said no, then changed her mind. c Ellie just went out and bought them. d Her mum said she couldn't buy them so she didn't. 2 Why does Ellie always obey her father? a Because he sets a good example of how to behave. b Because he always gives her what she wants. c Because he is very strict. d Because he doesn't get cross and talks in a reasonable way. 3 Ellie's ideas about parenting a are shared by many people of her own age. b are unusual for a teenager. c come from a book called How Teenagers Think. d have surprised many of her friends. 4 Teenagers would respect parents more if a parents didn't argue with them. b parents told them more often that they didn't deserve to be treated like adults. c parents rewarded them more often. d they didn’t treatthem like little children. 5 How does Ellie react to her mum's lack oftrust? a It makes her feel stupid. b It makes her tell her mum exactly what is happening in her life. c It makes her not want to talk about herselfto her mum. d It makes herthink her mum is stupid. 3» L- Closing the generation gap /1 n nsdII'5 O quid: 1: wine W‘‘'‘ ‘' Ieenufl" 09O€QOfi| l0t6l(iI(‘Ct‘(', (CCCCSE Sixteen-year—old Ellie, who lives with her parents, Louise, 38, and Peter, 43, has written a book to tell us what parents of teenagers are doing wrong. All adults think teenagers are a nightmare. According to them, we're moody, argumentative, rude and disruptive. But have any adults ever stopped to think that perhaps they are responsible for the unpredictable and confusing way we behave? Take me, for instance. I may be a teenage nightmare, but this is all to do with my parents, not me. With my mother, I stamp my feet, _st'orm'out’, of shops in the middle of arguments and moan until I get my own way. Just last week, for example, I persuaded mum to buy me a pair of shoes that she had said I couldn’t have. But my father, on the other hand, .turris‘me into a shining example of teenage perfection. I do as he asks, I don’t. ariswer , back‘and I happily accept that no means no. My parents have very different parenting styles. While my dad Zbririgs outthe best in me, by being calm and reasonable and treating me like an adult, my mum, like so many other parents of teenagers, inadvertently makes me want to rebel by being combative and speaking to me as though I’m still a child. Last summer, after yet another row in a shop with my mother, I decided to start writing down the way I felt about things. A few more rows later and I’d written more than 10,000 words of advice for parents. In December, having contacted various publishers, I signed a book deal. My parenting book, How Teenagers Think, is going to be published next year, the first of its type actually written by a teenager. Much of my book is based on my own experiences, but I’ve also interviewed my friends about their parents. Surprisingly, we all share similar views on what our parents are doing wrong. And it usually comes down to the fact that our parents care too much about us and don’t want to let us grow up. For example, mum drove me crazy a few weeks ago when she kept worrying ‘ < MATURA Zycie rodzinne I towarzyskie — Rozumienie tekstu czytanego Dobieranie I Wielokrotny wybdr

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