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Library Got Game

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In addition to the sources within the presentation, visit:

More information on board and face-to-face games:
http://people.lis.illinois.edu/~ddubin//games.html

A game design program for very young children:
http://www.squeakland.org/

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Library Got Game

  1. 1. Video Games, Literacy, and Strategies<br />LIBRARY GOT GAME<br />Maggie Hommel<br />Park Ridge Public Library<br />mhommel@prpl.org<br />
  2. 2. Why Video Games?<br />
  3. 3. Why Video Games?<br />Sixty-eight percent of American households play computer or video games.<br />Entertainment Software Association (2010)<br />
  4. 4. Why Video Games?<br />97% of teens ages 12-17 play computer, web, portable, or console games. <br />PEW Research (2008)<br />
  5. 5. Why Video Games?<br />Did you Know… <br />Average gamer is 35 years old and has been playing for 12 years.<br />Average game purchaser is 39 years old.<br />40% of game players are women. <br />Source: Entertainment Software Association<br />
  6. 6. Why Video Games?<br />Industry Comparison - 2008<br />
  7. 7. Why Video Games?<br />
  8. 8. Face-to-Face and Board Games<br />http://sls.gvboces.org/gaming<br />
  9. 9. School Standards<br />www.ala.org/aasl/standards<br />http://www.p21.org/<br />Partnership for 21st Century Skills Framework<br />
  10. 10. Concerns: Violence<br />
  11. 11. Concerns<br />
  12. 12. Concerns: Violence<br />Violence<br />“No Strong Link Seen Between Violent Video Games and Aggression.”Science Daily. 12 Aug 2005.<br />“How Violent Video Games Are Exemplary Aggression Teachers.”Science Daily. 14 Nov 2007.<br />
  13. 13. Concerns: Violence<br />Exemplary Aggression Teachers Article:<br />Video games use the same techniques that really great teachers use<br />motivate learners to persevere in learning and mastering skills to navigate through complex problems and changing environments<br />
  14. 14. Concerns: Violence<br />www.commonsensemedia.org<br />www.esrb.com<br />
  15. 15. Concerns: Addiction<br />
  16. 16. Concerns: Addiction<br />“Made for Addiction” (Chapter 4)<br />Driving Forces:<br /> #1: Beating the Game<br /> #2: Competition<br /> #3: Mastery<br /> #4: Exploration<br /> #5: Scoring High<br /> #6: Story-Driven Play<br /> #7: Relationships<br />
  17. 17. Video Games as Bait<br />Loss Leaders?<br />
  18. 18. Video Games & Learning<br />
  19. 19. Taking Play Seriously<br />What Makes a Game?<br />Fun<br />Winning & Losing<br />Rules<br />
  20. 20. Taking Play Seriously<br />Play = central part of brain growth and development<br />Problem solving, practice<br />Adapting to an ever- changing environment<br />Henig, Robin Marantz. “Taking Play Seriously.” New York Times Magazine. 17 Feb 2008<br />
  21. 21. Video Games and Learning<br />Video Games Are Not Novels<br />
  22. 22. Video Games and Learning<br />Everything Bad is Good For You / Johnson<br />
  23. 23. Video Games and Learning<br />Marc Prensky James Paul Gee<br />MIT Media Lab http://www.media.mit.edu/<br />G+L+S http://www.gameslearningsociety.org/<br />MacArthur Fnd. http://digitallearning.macfound.org<br />
  24. 24. Video Games and Learning<br />Simple vs. Complex Games<br />
  25. 25. Video Games and Learning<br />Content vs. Process<br />2187<br />37<br />3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3<br />
  26. 26. Video Games and Learning<br />Situated Meaning<br />
  27. 27. Video Games and Learning<br />New Identities<br />
  28. 28. Video Games and Learning<br />Motivation <br />
  29. 29. Video Games and Learning<br />Practice<br />
  30. 30. Gaming @ the Library<br />
  31. 31. Gaming @ the Library<br />
  32. 32. Gaming @ the Library<br />Social<br />Runescape Party<br />
  33. 33. Gaming @ the Library<br />Physical<br />
  34. 34. Gaming @ the Library<br />Competitive<br />
  35. 35. Gaming @ the Library<br />All Ages<br />
  36. 36. Gaming @ the Library<br />Creative<br />
  37. 37. Gaming @ the Library <br />Game Design www.gamemakeracademy.org<br />
  38. 38. Gaming @ the Library <br />Game Design http://scratch.mit.edu<br />
  39. 39. Gaming @ the Library <br />Game Design www.alice.org<br />
  40. 40. Gaming @ the Library<br />Keys to Success:<br />Talk to your patrons<br />Act quickly<br />Be responsive<br />Be creative<br />
  41. 41. Let’s Play!<br />
  42. 42. Crayon Physics (Puzzle)<br />www.crayonphysics.com<br />
  43. 43. Independent Games Festival<br />http://www.igf.com<br />
  44. 44. Spore <br />Spore Creature Creator http://www.spore.com<br />
  45. 45. HP & the Half-Blood Prince<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3EIz9LIYz4&feature=related<br />
  46. 46. Grand Ages: Rome (Content)<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMKYNfKPcOM&feature=related<br />
  47. 47. Uncharted 2 (Cliffhanger)<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69EBDlnDw2k<br />
  48. 48. Final Fantasy XIII (Story)<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXv9DixV_Fo<br />
  49. 49. Parting Ideas<br />Give access to games on computers, in collection, etc.<br />Use games as starting point for other creative programming<br />Listen to patrons & what they are interested in<br />Play!<br />
  50. 50. For slides & sources:<br />http://www.slideshare.net/magpie984<br />
  51. 51. Thank you!<br />Maggie Hommel<br />Reader Services Manager<br />Park Ridge Public Library<br />mhommel@prpl.org<br />

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