Mutual feedback in e-portfolio    assessment: an approach to        the netfolio system          The atrikel is writhen by...
The Netfolio systemThis paper presents an alternative application of e-portfolio in auniversity student assessment context...
This study does not consider the results of theseco-evaluation processes involving both teacherand student in a summative ...
Avantages with The netfolio concept• the students learn to discuss decisions and  relate contents• the continuous improvem...
Derrick and Davis (2006)• …have argued that sometimes the feedback  process in online education needs to be more  explicit...
Shortcomings of regular e-portfolios• Their format is most frequently based on the  individual creation of work.• The coll...
netfolio• In short, the netfolio overcomes the limitation of working alone and  the restricted range of learning experienc...
technolegy• Perspectives are shared by students through  specific forums. The first is located in a forum site  in each co...
complete rubric of the course is        displayed in which three    types of qualitative assessments      appear in an aut...
The students in the test were divided into two groups:                     Group A “classical e-portfolio»                ...
Findings• Group B graded higher than Group A• Greater number of revisions Group A reaches  an average of 0.6%, while Group...
Conclusions• feedback between peers should not be an accidental  practise, but an essential, integrated component of the  ...
MOOC      massive open online course• Self-assessments• Peer assessment• Rubrics are often used in conjunction with  Self-...
Daphne KollerCo founder Coursera    We ended up using is peer grading. It turns out                           that previou...
http://www.ted.com/talks/daphne_koller_what_we_re_learning_from_online_education.html
Mutual feedback in e portfolio assessment
Mutual feedback in e portfolio assessment
Mutual feedback in e portfolio assessment
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Mutual feedback in e portfolio assessment

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Mutual feedback in e portfolio assessment

  1. 1. Mutual feedback in e-portfolio assessment: an approach to the netfolio system The atrikel is writhen by Elena Barbera. She is is a professor currently (2009) involved with the Department of Psychology and Education Studies at the Open University of Catalonia as a teacher coordinator of the Educational Psychology areaThis summary is written by MagnusNohr April 2013 as a student work inthe program e-assesment @ HiOA
  2. 2. The Netfolio systemThis paper presents an alternative application of e-portfolio in auniversity student assessment context. A concept based on studentcollaboration (called netfolio) is developed, that differs from theclassical e-portfolio concept. The use of a netfolio, a network ofstudent e-portfolios, in a virtual classroom is explained through anexploratory study. A netfolio is more than a group of e-portfoliosbecause it offers students a better understanding of learningobjectives and promotes self-revision through participation inassessment of other students learning, as indicated through theirportfolios. Class student e-portfolios are interconnected in a uniquenetfolio such that each student assesses their peers work and at thesame time is being assessed. This process creates a chain of co-evaluators, facilitating a mutual and progressive improvement process.Results about teachers and students mutual feedback are presentedand the benefits of the process in terms of academic achievements areanalysed.
  3. 3. This study does not consider the results of theseco-evaluation processes involving both teacherand student in a summative evaluation, as isoften the case (Hall, 1995). Instead, they areunderstood as scaffolding methods at the heartof a formative evaluation directed at improvingteaching and learning.
  4. 4. Avantages with The netfolio concept• the students learn to discuss decisions and relate contents• the continuous improvement that it can offer a student. A student does not see the work as definitive but can steadily improve it over the learning period.
  5. 5. Derrick and Davis (2006)• …have argued that sometimes the feedback process in online education needs to be more explicit than in face-to-face education to have similar educational effects. The netfolio seems to be a useful tool in achieving this aim because of the inclusion of peer and co- assessment processes and their consequences
  6. 6. Shortcomings of regular e-portfolios• Their format is most frequently based on the individual creation of work.• The collective value that other students may bring to the work is not taken into account.• It is not a complete work because it is not submitted as a single large text but as pieces of work that are very interesting but unconnected to each other.
  7. 7. netfolio• In short, the netfolio overcomes the limitation of working alone and the restricted range of learning experiences that characterise ‘classic’ e-portfolios.• For its part, a netfolio is basically a large mesh of different learning outcomes driven by two assumptions:• (1) It offers different interpretations of each piece of students’work corresponding to a learning objective or a specific competence in terms of professional skills put forward by diverse students.• (2) it understands each student’s portfolio as a multi-text that interweaves the different demonstrations of learning outcomes into a larger text with a global and interrelated meaning. Thefirst assumption refers to the communication between students that validates or clarifies the demonstration of an agreed core of competence.
  8. 8. technolegy• Perspectives are shared by students through specific forums. The first is located in a forum site in each competence section, to which all students have access; the other emerges in the student’s personal forum, which can be accessed by the other students.• The final result of the contributions to the latter forum is what should be reflected in the introductory page (presentation section) of the netfolio as cognitive changes induced by equals.
  9. 9. complete rubric of the course is displayed in which three types of qualitative assessments appear in an automatic box:.(1) Self-assessments of thestudents themselves;(2) assessments of other students in the e-portfolio (mutual assessments);(3) the teacher’s assessments
  10. 10. The students in the test were divided into two groups: Group A “classical e-portfolio» Group B “the netfolio system» (1) questionnaires (2) analysis of documentation and interactions posted onThe results obtained initially confirmthat the different portfolios—these includeboth e-portfolio and netfolio are valid student dialogues and feedback from thetools for learning assessment of university teacher and classmates.students.
  11. 11. Findings• Group B graded higher than Group A• Greater number of revisions Group A reaches an average of 0.6%, while Group B reaches 1.9%. Using the netfolio leads to more revisions both by the students, of their own work, and amongst students, and this in turn leads to better final results.• The greatest differences between the groups can be detected in this section of interaction.
  12. 12. Conclusions• feedback between peers should not be an accidental practise, but an essential, integrated component of the evaluation system• The teacher does not provide more feedback in the development of the netfolio than in the classical e-portfolio but must bring together a more complex network of interactions between the students and intervene when necessary.• “We expected greater satisfaction amongst the students who used the netfolio in comparison with the oneswho used the more traditional e-portfolio. This greater satisfaction was expected as a result of the cohesion and internal relations within the group itself; however, the greater attention and load of electronic interactions is evidence that it did not occur as expected”
  13. 13. MOOC massive open online course• Self-assessments• Peer assessment• Rubrics are often used in conjunction with Self- and Peer-Assessment
  14. 14. Daphne KollerCo founder Coursera We ended up using is peer grading. It turns out that previous studies show, like this one by Saddler and Good, that peer grading is a surprisingly effective strategy for providing reproducible grades. It was tried only in small classes, but there it showed, for example, that these student-assigned grades on the y-axis are actually very well correlated with the teacher- assigned grade on the x-axis. Whats even more surprising is that self-grades, where the students grade their own work critically -- so long as you incentivize them properly so they cant give themselves a perfect score -- are actually even better correlated with the teacher grades.
  15. 15. http://www.ted.com/talks/daphne_koller_what_we_re_learning_from_online_education.html

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