Ceramics in the 20th and 21st Centuries
Modernism
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In the late 19th and early 20th century.
Rejected the traditional idea of realism, and
replace...
Arts and Crafts Movement
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An international design movement that happened
between 1860 – 1910.
It was led by ...
Modern Ceramics in Britain
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Modern style: simple abstract forms, with little
decoration.
Lucie Rie (1902 - 1995): an ...
Modern Ceramics in Britain
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Ruth Duckworth
(1919 – 2009):
German-born,
worked in Britain.
She is known for her
unglazed ...
Modern Ceramics in Britain
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Hans Coper (1920 – 1981): produced nonfunctional, sculptural pots (which were often
unglazed...
Modern Ceramics in Britain
●

Elizabeth Fritsch (1940 - ): studied
ceramics under Hans Coper at the Royal
College of Art i...
Modern Ceramics in Britain
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Bernard Leach (1887 – 1979): although he lived at the
same time as Hans Coper, Ruth Duckwort...
Modern Ceramics
in North America
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Peter Voulkos and John Mason led the
modernist trend in Los Angeles, Californ...
Modern Ceramics
in North America
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Peter Voulkos (1924 – 2002) became known for his large,
aggressive clay sculptures tha...
Modern Ceramics
in North America
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John Mason (1927 - ) makes work that focused on exploring
the physical properties of c...
Post-Modernism
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Post-Modernism started as a reaction against the
rules of Modernism.
In Modernism there was a focu...
Post-Modernism:
The Funk Movement
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Funk Art, like Pop Art, used commercial products
and consumerism as their subje...
Post-Modernism:
the Funk Movement
Post-Modernism & Architecture
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Post-Modern ceramics, influenced by Post-Modern
architects like Michael Graves and Robert...
Defining Post-Modernism
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Because Post-Modernism encourages individuality, it
is difficult to define what Post-Modern ...
1) Bright Colour, Playful Form, Pattern-Friendly

^Howard Kottler

Ron Nagle >
2) Post-Minimalism
(moves past Modernism's focus on simplicity by adding little
embellishments)

Wouter Dam ^

Magdalene O...
3) Pattern & Decoration

< Betty Woodman,

Ralph Bacerra >
4) The “Multiple Vessel”

< Elsa Rady,
Piet Stockmans >
5) Organic Abstraction

Tony Marsh ^
Chris Gustin >
6) The Super-Real

^ Marilyn Levine
Tip Toland >
7) History & Culture
(artists use current events & issues as inspiration for their work)

Richard Notkin
Grayson Perry
8) Image on the Vessel
Kurt Weiser

Anne Kraus

Jason
Walker
9) The Vessel as Flat Image

Elizabeth Fritsch
Paul Mathieu,

Greg Payce
10) The Figure

Viola Frey

Sergei Isupov
10) The Figure

Akio Takamori
Jean-Pierre Larocque
Doug Jeck
11) Abstraction

< Ken Price
Barbara Nanning >
12) Post-Industrialism
(we have moved into a digital age, with most of our industrial
needs being out-sourced to places li...
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Unit 5. 20 and 21st century ceramics

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Gr. 11 Ceramics Unit 5, Ceramics in the 20th and 21st Centuries

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Unit 5. 20 and 21st century ceramics

  1. 1. Ceramics in the 20th and 21st Centuries
  2. 2. Modernism ● ● ● ● ● ● In the late 19th and early 20th century. Rejected the traditional idea of realism, and replaced it with abstract art. The mantra, “Make it new!” led to experiments with abstract form. Modernist work drew attention to the processes and materials used. Simple colour and shape were the basis of modern art. Like in architecture, modern art valued simplicity and rejected decoration.
  3. 3. Arts and Crafts Movement ● ● ● ● ● An international design movement that happened between 1860 – 1910. It was led by artist and writer, William Morris during the 1860s. The A & C Movement developed first in Britain, but later spread to Europe and North America. It was a reaction against big industry and the resulting abandonment of handmade decorative arts. The A & C Movement stood for traditional craft, using simple forms and folk style decoration.
  4. 4. Modern Ceramics in Britain ● ● Modern style: simple abstract forms, with little decoration. Lucie Rie (1902 - 1995): an Austrian refugee. Her work was functional. She is known for her pinstriped bowls and bottles.
  5. 5. Modern Ceramics in Britain ● Ruth Duckworth (1919 – 2009): German-born, worked in Britain. She is known for her unglazed porcelain sculptures and wallsculptures. True to the modernist style, her work is characterized by simplified abstract forms.
  6. 6. Modern Ceramics in Britain ● Hans Coper (1920 – 1981): produced nonfunctional, sculptural pots (which were often unglazed). He would throw parts on the wheel, then alter and assemble them. His works tend to have rough surfaces, and are often coloured with a brown-black oxide.
  7. 7. Modern Ceramics in Britain ● Elizabeth Fritsch (1940 - ): studied ceramics under Hans Coper at the Royal College of Art in London, England. She developed a flattened coil technique that turned her vessels into 2D profiles. She painted geometric decoration with slips.
  8. 8. Modern Ceramics in Britain ● Bernard Leach (1887 – 1979): although he lived at the same time as Hans Coper, Ruth Duckworth, etc., he continued to work in functional pottery. After studying ceramics in Japan, he established a different style of pottery influenced by Far-Eastern and medieval English forms. He fired a lot of his work in wood-burning kilns. His style became very influential.
  9. 9. Modern Ceramics in North America ● ● ● ● Peter Voulkos and John Mason led the modernist trend in Los Angeles, California. They led the abstract expressionist movement in clay. Abstract expressionism is characterized by dramatically large, experimental forms that expressed the subconscious. Abstract expressionist ceramics were known for their “rawness, spontaneity, and expressiveness” (Richard Marshall).
  10. 10. Modern Ceramics in North America ● Peter Voulkos (1924 – 2002) became known for his large, aggressive clay sculptures that tore apart the idea of the traditional vessel. His sculptures are recognizable by their visual weight, free-formed construction and energetic decoration.
  11. 11. Modern Ceramics in North America ● John Mason (1927 - ) makes work that focused on exploring the physical properties of clay and its plasticity. He was inspired by math concepts relating to rotation, symmetry, and modules.
  12. 12. Post-Modernism ● ● ● Post-Modernism started as a reaction against the rules of Modernism. In Modernism there was a focus on abstract forms, truth to materials (clay should look like clay), and simplicity of form and colour. Some historians say that Post-Modernism began with the work of Robert Arneson, the father of the Funk Movement.
  13. 13. Post-Modernism: The Funk Movement ● ● ● Funk Art, like Pop Art, used commercial products and consumerism as their subject matter. Unlike Pop Art, which was cool and clean, Funk was confrontational and messy. Arneson's work includes a lot of self-portraits, done with a sarcastic sense of humour.
  14. 14. Post-Modernism: the Funk Movement
  15. 15. Post-Modernism & Architecture ● Post-Modern ceramics, influenced by Post-Modern architects like Michael Graves and Robert Venturi, became bright, colourful, playful, and decorative. Graves Venturi
  16. 16. Defining Post-Modernism ● ● Because Post-Modernism encourages individuality, it is difficult to define what Post-Modern ceramics is. There are several trends: 1. bright colour, playful form, pattern-friendly 7. history & culture 8. image on the vessel 2. Post-Minimalism 9. the vessel as flat 3. pattern & decoration image 4. the multiple vessel 10. the figure 5. organic abstraction 11. abstraction 6. the super-real 12. Post-Industrialism
  17. 17. 1) Bright Colour, Playful Form, Pattern-Friendly ^Howard Kottler Ron Nagle >
  18. 18. 2) Post-Minimalism (moves past Modernism's focus on simplicity by adding little embellishments) Wouter Dam ^ Magdalene Odundo >
  19. 19. 3) Pattern & Decoration < Betty Woodman, Ralph Bacerra >
  20. 20. 4) The “Multiple Vessel” < Elsa Rady, Piet Stockmans >
  21. 21. 5) Organic Abstraction Tony Marsh ^ Chris Gustin >
  22. 22. 6) The Super-Real ^ Marilyn Levine Tip Toland >
  23. 23. 7) History & Culture (artists use current events & issues as inspiration for their work) Richard Notkin Grayson Perry
  24. 24. 8) Image on the Vessel Kurt Weiser Anne Kraus Jason Walker
  25. 25. 9) The Vessel as Flat Image Elizabeth Fritsch Paul Mathieu, Greg Payce
  26. 26. 10) The Figure Viola Frey Sergei Isupov
  27. 27. 10) The Figure Akio Takamori Jean-Pierre Larocque Doug Jeck
  28. 28. 11) Abstraction < Ken Price Barbara Nanning >
  29. 29. 12) Post-Industrialism (we have moved into a digital age, with most of our industrial needs being out-sourced to places like China; some artists use the abandoned factories and industrial sites as inspiration) Dan Anderson ^ Steven Montgomery >

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