Ceramics Unit 3 Aesthetic Analysis

5,460 views

Published on

aesthetic analysis of ceramic artworks

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,460
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
12
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
42
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ceramics Unit 3 Aesthetic Analysis

  1. 1. Unit 3 Aesthetic Analysis
  2. 2. Lesson 1: Aesthetic Analysis ● ● Aesthetics – the study of beauty Art criticism – describing the sensory and aesthetic qualities of artworks
  3. 3. Steps in Aesthetic Analysis 1) Describe the object's sensory qualities. ● Shape & form ● hue (lightness/darkness of a colour), intensity, opacity (is it see through or not?) geometric (having a regular shape/form; ex. - square, oval, circle) organic (having an irregular shape/form; ex. - blobs, animal/human forms) Colour ● Space Positive space (space that is taken up by the object) ● Line width (thick, thin), length, sharpness/fuzziness, continuous/broken, flowing, movement, direction (horizontal, vertical, diagonal), boundaries/ edges negative space (space within a vessel, or within the boundaries of an object; ex. - underneath a chair) ● Texture rough, smooth, ridged, pebbly, grooved, high relief, low relief, intaglio
  4. 4. Steps in Aesthetic Analysis 2) Describe the object's formal qualities. ● Balance Imagine a line through the object. Are the sides balanced? How do colour, line, and texture contribute to a feeling of balance? Is the object symmetrical (the same on both sides) or asymmetrical (not the same on both sides)? Is it top-heavy (more visual weight at the top)? Or bottomheavy (more visual weight at the bottom)? ● Unity Are all the parts harmonized? Do the texture and decoration make sense with the form? ● Proportion & size How would you describe the size of the object? Think of length, height, width, volume, weight, thickness. Do the proportions of the vessel make sense considering its function? If a sculpture is representational, does it accurately copy the proportions of a model? Are the proportions unusual, and how does this affect the overall object?
  5. 5. Steps in Aesthetic Analysis 2) Describe the object's formal qualities. ● Movement and Rhythm Are any designs or shapes repeated? Are they repeated in the same way each time, or do they vary? How? Do the designs or textures feel fast or slow? ● Emphasis Does one area grab your attention more than others? Why? How did the artist emphasize that part? ● Pattern Are the patterns random or planned? Are they because of repeated lines, colours, shapes, or textures? Think of words like radial (radiating from a centre point), grid, alternating, border or band.
  6. 6. Steps in Aesthetic Analysis 3) Describe the object's expressive qualities. ● Mood happy, witty, whimsical, playful, clumsy, mysterious, reflective, calm, quiet, sad... ● Tension What kind of energy does the object have: tranquil, dynamic, powerful, relaxed, conflicted, heavy... ● Ideals/concepts Does the work represent an ideal or concept? Heroism, nobility, villainy, ...
  7. 7. Steps in Aesthetic Analysis 4) Describe the object's technical qualities. ● Clay What type of clay was used: earthenware, stoneware, porcelain? ● Process How was it made? Pinching, coil-building, slab-building, thrown on the wheel? ● Decoration What methods were used on the surface? Incising, impressing, carving...? What colourants were used: oxides, underglazes, glazes? ● Firing How was it fired: oxidation, reduction? In what kind of kiln: electric, gas, wood...?
  8. 8. 1. Sensory properties Shape, form, line, colour, space, texture 2. Formal properties Balance, unity, proportion/ size, movement/rhythm, emphasis, pattern 3. Expressive properties Mood, tension, idea/concept By Richard Notkin
  9. 9. 1. Sensory properties Shape, form, line, colour, space, texture 2. Formal properties Balance, unity, proportion/ size, movement/rhythm, emphasis, pattern 3. Expressive properties Mood, tension, idea/concept By Claire Palastanga
  10. 10. By Magda Gluszek 1. Sensory properties Shape, form, line, colour, space, texture 2. Formal properties Balance, unity, proportion/ size, movement/rhythm, emphasis, pattern 3. Expressive properties Mood, tension, idea/concept
  11. 11. 1. Sensory properties Shape, form, line, colour, space, texture 2. Formal properties Balance, unity, proportion/ size, movement/rhythm, emphasis, pattern 3. Expressive properties Mood, tension, idea/concept Fernand Leger
  12. 12. 1. Sensory properties Shape, form, line, colour, space, texture 2. Formal properties Balance, unity, proportion/ size, movement/rhythm, emphasis, pattern 3. Expressive properties Mood, tension, idea/concept Eva Hild
  13. 13. Debra Fritts

×