Management & Technology




KM2.0 – Myth or Legend?
    0    yt o ege d


Matthew H d
M tth Hodgson
ACT Regional-lead, Web...
Podcasts and Slideshare
Podcasts and Slideshare




           www.slideshare.net/magia3e
A little audience participation . . . 
Fact or myth?
Fact or myth?
Logical or mythological?
Logical or mythological?
Objective or subjective?
Objective or subjective?
A short history of myth
A short history of myth
As we evolved …
As we evolved …
Blaming Aristotle
Blaming Aristotle

        Knowledge = Definition
Blaming Aristotle
Blaming Aristotle
 Is:                Is not:
 • Round            • Square
 • Cake             • Beer
 •...
Repositories for expertly defined knowledge
Repositories for expertly defined knowledge
Modern repositories
Modern repositories




         After years of harboring his secret desires
           Ned finally hi...
More recently …
More recently …
… and in our own organisations
  and in our own organisations
People
                           p
                               Rewards
                                               ...
The world of knowledge is changing
The world of knowledge is changing
Web2.0: the new world
Web2.0: the new world
Embraces :
• Subjective opinion – even Homer Simpson’s view of the world
• Per...
Knowledge as a product? 
Knowledge as a product?




              Constantly busy
                                       ...
Web 2.0 knowledge processes
Web 2.0 knowledge processes
                 Refine




‘Burst’ of
 thinking    Tag and share ...
Web 2.0 knowledge roles
Web 2.0 knowledge roles
                                    33%

       19%
                      ...
Web 2.0 behaviour
Web 2.0 behaviour
Creator:
Creator
• Create, work “in the cloud”, comment, messaging
Critic:
• Comment t...
Web 2.0 knowledge tools
Web 2.0 knowledge tools
Creator – making new knowledge:
• Blog, Wikis, comment fields, instant mes...
Why do they do this?
Why do they do this?


                            Creativity, problem solving, spontaneity

        ...
It s also about choice
It’s also about choice




                         Source: M Hodgson, 2007
It’s a model that works!
It s a model that works!
Some stats:
• 6.5 billion people on the planet
• O 1 billion people use ...
How can we leverage this for KM?
How can we leverage this for KM?
It doesn t just happen – you need good strategy
   doesn...
Social computing building blocks
Social computing building blocks




                             Source: G Smith, 2007
Case study: KM & social computing tools
Case study: KM & social computing tools
The problem
The problem
Standard solution
Standard solution
Team s available brain space
Team’s available brain space
Conceptual solution
Conceptual solution
Delicious – sharing
Delicious 

                      HAS
                                   PARENT TERM OF
              ...
Twitter  conversations & community
Twitter – conversations & community
Delicious  sharing bookmarks
Delicious – sharing bookmarks
Blogs – sharing, conversations, and 
community
Benefits of using social computing tools
Benefits of using social computing tools
Managing the team s knowledge:
         ...
Results
The good:
• Supported team’s work behaviour, not prescribed it
• Vi ibilit of new knowledge practices
  Visibility...
Culture affects the way we work
Culture affects the way we work
                  There are national and
                 ...
Cultural Dimensions
Cultural Dimensions
High Power-Distance organisations:
     Power Distance
• Value power according to ...
Power‐Distance
Power Distance

            Small organisations
            Team-based work



                            ...
High Power‐Distance can kill!
High Power Distance can kill!
Reinforces:
• Empowers gatekeeper mentality
• Position power
•...
How to get around Power‐Distance
How to get around Power Distance
When l i
Wh planning and d li i strategy …
             ...
Conclusions
KM might be about:
• Storytelling
• Environments to support knowledge transfer

The reality – it’s Aristotle s...
Conclusions
Web 2.0 enables and values:
• Subjective – individuals, thoughts, expression, ideas
• Personal opinion – wheth...
Fin
Welcome to KM 2.0
KM2.0
  KM2 0
Myth or Legend?
Matthew Hodgson
ACT Regional-lead, Web and Information Management
         SMS Management & Technology



            Blog...
KM 2.0 - Myth or Legend ACTKM08
KM 2.0 - Myth or Legend ACTKM08
KM 2.0 - Myth or Legend ACTKM08
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KM 2.0 - Myth or Legend ACTKM08

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Matthew looks at Web 2.0, with a particular focus on how it supports social interaction in knowledge management activities – networking, collaboration and storytelling. He draws on theories and practices from social and organisational psychology to relate why this social revolution is so important for the future of knowledge management. He will demonstrate some of the tools of the modern knowledge worker, the psycho-social factors behind their success, and present how we can leverage them to support best-practice knowledge management within our organisations, with specific references to case studies in government in Canberra, Australia. He also examines elements of a modern KM strategy in the light of these tools to suggest ways in which we can look at strategically about supporting knowledge management in our organisations, rather than tactically.

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KM 2.0 - Myth or Legend ACTKM08

  1. 1. Management & Technology KM2.0 – Myth or Legend? 0 yt o ege d Matthew H d M tth Hodgson ACT Regional-lead, Web and Information Management SMS Management & Technology October 2008, ACTKM08
  2. 2. Podcasts and Slideshare Podcasts and Slideshare www.slideshare.net/magia3e
  3. 3. A little audience participation . . . 
  4. 4. Fact or myth? Fact or myth?
  5. 5. Logical or mythological? Logical or mythological?
  6. 6. Objective or subjective? Objective or subjective?
  7. 7. A short history of myth A short history of myth
  8. 8. As we evolved … As we evolved …
  9. 9. Blaming Aristotle Blaming Aristotle Knowledge = Definition
  10. 10. Blaming Aristotle Blaming Aristotle Is: Is not: • Round • Square • Cake • Beer • Sweet • Salty
  11. 11. Repositories for expertly defined knowledge Repositories for expertly defined knowledge
  12. 12. Modern repositories Modern repositories After years of harboring his secret desires Ned finally hits on the senior librarian
  13. 13. More recently … More recently …
  14. 14. … and in our own organisations and in our own organisations
  15. 15. People p Rewards Document management g Keyword AAA Explicit Tacit Workflow Hoarding Workflow Expert review Approvals Retrieval R ti l Classification …the knowledge world we live in g Knowledge capture Guard Content management Data aa Storytelling DIRKS Metadata Knowledge-base Database Business B siness classification scheme Processes Information management Performance
  16. 16. The world of knowledge is changing The world of knowledge is changing
  17. 17. Web2.0: the new world Web2.0: the new world Embraces : • Subjective opinion – even Homer Simpson’s view of the world • Personal stories • Thinking ‘out-loud’, not refined, edited, controlled communication • Interaction and trust between people (not documents or repositories) • Identity, membership and community building y p y g • Instant gratification, low-barrier adoption & light-weight processes Empowers: • I di id l – me as an expert without interference f Individuals t ith t i t f from ‘‘so-called’ ll d’ experts or gatekeepers • C Communities – it’s easy to be involved at any level
  18. 18. Knowledge as a product?  Knowledge as a product? Constantly busy Produce Get busy! Work in isolation Expert review something Expert classification and St Store
  19. 19. Web 2.0 knowledge processes Web 2.0 knowledge processes Refine ‘Burst’ of thinking Tag and share Communicate/ Collaborate
  20. 20. Web 2.0 knowledge roles Web 2.0 knowledge roles 33% 19% 13% 19% 15% Source: Forrester Research, 2008 52%
  21. 21. Web 2.0 behaviour Web 2.0 behaviour Creator: Creator • Create, work “in the cloud”, comment, messaging Critic: • Comment trackback, messaging Comment, trackback Collector: • Cl if and tag Classify d t Joiner: • Message, create personal profiles Spectator: • Message, email, passive consumption of material
  22. 22. Web 2.0 knowledge tools Web 2.0 knowledge tools Creator – making new knowledge: • Blog, Wikis, comment fields, instant messaging (eg. Twitter) . Critic – refining existing knowledge: • Blog comment fields Twitter Blog, fields, . Collector – sharing and classification: • Delicious, Magnolia, Tagging . Joiner – contributing to the social cohesion: • Twitter, personal profiles, friends’ profiles, community profiles . Spectator – just watching from the sidelines: • Twitter, email,
  23. 23. Why do they do this? Why do they do this? Creativity, problem solving, spontaneity Self-esteem, confidence, achievement, respect of other b others S lf t fid hi t t f th by th Family, friendship, community, intimacy Shelter, security Food, water, air, sleep Source: Wikipedia (Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, 1943)
  24. 24. It s also about choice It’s also about choice Source: M Hodgson, 2007
  25. 25. It’s a model that works! It s a model that works! Some stats: • 6.5 billion people on the planet • O 1 billion people use th I t Over billi l the Internet [1] t • 0.5 billion use websites that facilitate social interaction, networking, and knowledge sharing [2] • Blogs – 77.7 million unique visitors in the USA alone [3] • Facebook – 41.0 million • M S MySpace – 75 1 million 75.1 illi • Wikipedia – 100 million hours of evolving knowledge, 2.5 illi 2 5 million iin English articles, 167 million revisions, 5.5 million E li h ti l illi i i 5 5 illi registered ‘authors’
  26. 26. How can we leverage this for KM? How can we leverage this for KM? It doesn t just happen – you need good strategy doesn’t People: P l • Understand people – how they think and behave • K Know about organisationall culture – esp. it li it ti b t i ti lt its limitations Objectives: • What behaviour do we want to reinforce and why • What do we want to achieve – the ROI to aim for Technology: • Supporting behaviour with appropriate tools pp g pp p • Know any technology constraints Source: Based on Forrester’s POST model , 2007
  27. 27. Social computing building blocks Social computing building blocks Source: G Smith, 2007
  28. 28. Case study: KM & social computing tools Case study: KM & social computing tools
  29. 29. The problem The problem
  30. 30. Standard solution Standard solution
  31. 31. Team s available brain space Team’s available brain space
  32. 32. Conceptual solution Conceptual solution
  33. 33. Delicious – sharing Delicious  HAS PARENT TERM OF TERM EQUIVALENT TO Wiki HAS HAS TERM TERM PARENT TERM OF
  34. 34. Twitter  conversations & community Twitter – conversations & community
  35. 35. Delicious  sharing bookmarks Delicious – sharing bookmarks
  36. 36. Blogs – sharing, conversations, and  community
  37. 37. Benefits of using social computing tools Benefits of using social computing tools Managing the team s knowledge: team’s • People – enabled Web 2.0 role diversity (creators, collectors, etc) • Objectives – share ‘what we knew , as we knew it as it evolved what knew’ it, • Technology – store context, who (selves!) knew what about which terms, terms enabled networking within and without the project For the project: • Quick to set-up and easy to use p y • Accessible – web front-end so available off-site • Saved time – central location de centralised control location, de-centralised • Repository for single source publishing – terms into multiple physical documents for multiple uses
  38. 38. Results The good: • Supported team’s work behaviour, not prescribed it • Vi ibilit of new knowledge practices Visibility f k l d ti • Affected other people’s behaviour - other project teams j from other divisions took notice, joined in, and used these tools The bad: • We had broken traditional editorial approval process • The wiki was closed down …. why?
  39. 39. Culture affects the way we work Culture affects the way we work There are national and regional cultural groupings that affect the behaviour of societies and organisations, and that are very persistent across time.
  40. 40. Cultural Dimensions Cultural Dimensions High Power-Distance organisations: Power Distance • Value power according to rank • V l hi Value hierarchy over fl t organisationall structures h flat i ti t t • Love chain-of-command • Demand respect and formal deference for higher status people • Lots of formal processes and policies Low Power-Distance organisations: • Flat structures • Informal processes and policies
  41. 41. Power‐Distance Power Distance Small organisations Team-based work Many government organisations Source: Hodgson, M (2008) The Relationship Economy
  42. 42. High Power‐Distance can kill! High Power Distance can kill! Reinforces: • Empowers gatekeeper mentality • Position power • Control • Knowledge as a linear, edited, and defined product Almost impossible to: • Change – it’s the organisation’s personality we’re talking about • Introduce low-hierarchical activities encompassed by ‘social computing’ social computing
  43. 43. How to get around Power‐Distance How to get around Power Distance When l i Wh planning and d li i strategy … d delivering t t Deploy it: • At a team-levell or project llevell t l j t Plan: • Security measures to keep it inside the team • LLeverage profiles and llogins fil d i Communicate: • From the bottom-up • Sell victories & story-tell lessons learned (blog about it?)
  44. 44. Conclusions KM might be about: • Storytelling • Environments to support knowledge transfer The reality – it’s Aristotle s world of knowledge: it s Aristotle’s • 2000 years of expert knowledge as process • Objecti e factual, scientific and ph sical Objective, fact al physical • Expertly defined • Expertly crafted and classified • Reinforces position-power p p • High Power-Distance • Coming to an end
  45. 45. Conclusions Web 2.0 enables and values: • Subjective – individuals, thoughts, expression, ideas • Personal opinion – whether fact or myth • Self and community rather than ‘experts’ • Different knowledge worker roles – collectors creators collectors, creators, critics, joiners, spectators • Simple light-weight tools knowledge workers can use at Simple, home Web 2.0 is legendary stuff: • S i l revolution online Social l ti li • Heralds a paradigm shift in Western thinking
  46. 46. Fin Welcome to KM 2.0
  47. 47. KM2.0 KM2 0 Myth or Legend?
  48. 48. Matthew Hodgson ACT Regional-lead, Web and Information Management SMS Management & Technology Blog: magia3e.wordpress.com Twitter: magia3e Slideshare: www.slideshare.net/magia3e Email: mhodgson@smsmt.com g @ Mobile: 0404 006695

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