Domaine des langues   ANNEXE -   English as a Second Language   351
Domaine des langues                  English as a Second Language1                                     352




           ...
The three competencies are developed in synergy; they
are worked on in an integrated manner to allow students
to acquire t...
Domaine des langues                English as a Second Language                                    354


COMPETENCY 1 • TO...
Key Features of the Competency                                                                                         Eva...
Domaine des langues              English as a Second Language                                    356


COMPETENCY 2 • TO R...
Key Features of the Competency                                                                                    Evaluati...
Domaine des langues              English as a Second Language                                     358


COMPETENCY 3 • TO ...
Key Features of the Competency                                                                           Evaluation Criter...
Domaine des langues                English as a Second Language                          360


Essential Knowledge
The stu...
STRATEGIES                                                                          – Note-taking (writing down relevant i...
Domaine des langues              English as a Second Language                            362

TEXT COMPONENTS             ...
Notes
Notes
Ministère
13-0003-07   de l’Éducation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Primary Program

599 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
599
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Primary Program

  1. 1. Domaine des langues ANNEXE - English as a Second Language 351
  2. 2. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language1 352 Introduction For most young Quebekers, learning English provides an in language acquisition, cognitive psychology and social opportunity to communicate with people of another lan- constructivism. It is essential that students speak and are guage and culture. It is also a necessity, given Québec’s spoken to only in English from day one. geographical location, the presence of an English com- It is essential that students munity and the accessibility of English media and cultur- The program aims at developing the competencies speak and are spoken to al products. In learning a second language, students deemed essential for students in Québec schools in the broaden their horizons and gain a new appreciation for 21st century and requires the mobilization of knowledge only in English from day one. the richness of learning languages. such as functional language, compensatory and learning strategies, and use of resources. These competencies are: The elementary English as a Second Language (ESL) pro- To interact orally in English, To reinvest understanding of gram follows in the footsteps of the previous program in oral and written texts, and To write texts. Therefore, ESL terms of the priority given to communication. In fact, oral learning requires a rich and stimulating linguistic and cul- interaction is the cornerstone of this program, in which tural environment where English is the language of com- the students use English in all classroom situations. In the munication. Since the students are learning to communi- past decade, research on the communicative approach cate in English within a classroom community of speak- has shown that when students are made aware of the ers, readers and writers, this program contributes to the structure of the target language, the speed at which they development of cross-curricular competencies as well as become skilled communicators is greatly accelerated.The to broad themes for learning. ESL program takes this additional refinement of the com- municative approach into account. Moreover, the ESL program integrates listening, speaking, reading and writ- ing, but it does so in the light of the latest developments 1 Ce programme n’étant donné qu’en anglais, il est, conformément à la Politique linguistique du ministère de l’Éducation, présenté ici dans cette langue.
  3. 3. The three competencies are developed in synergy; they are worked on in an integrated manner to allow students to acquire the most meaningful learning possible. To Figure 6 interact orally in English is at the heart of ESL learning English as a Second Language and is present when developing the other two compe- tencies. When students reinvest understanding of oral and written texts, they explore various types of texts and perform tasks by making use of the other two compe- tencies. When students write texts, they express them- selves for an intended audience and deliver a personal- ized product. Learning To reinvest understanding of oral and written texts, and To write texts leads to numerous opportunities for oral interaction. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 353
  4. 4. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 354 COMPETENCY 1 • TO INTERACT ORALLY IN ENGLISH Focus of the Competency MEANING OF THE COMPETENCY CONNECTIONS TO CROSS-CURRICULAR COMPETENCIES DEVELOPMENTAL PROFILE Right from the beginning in Elementary 3, students The very nature of oral interaction puts students to work To develop the competency, students react to messages express themselves in English in any given classroom sit- with others. Therefore in order to build the necessary using strategies, take the initiative to transmit oral mes- uation (classroom life, themes explored, carrying out cooperative and social skills, students draw upon the sages using strategies and maintain oral interaction tasks, students’ own interests). They are immersed in cross-curricular competency To cooperate. Also, for inter- using strategies. When they react to messages, students the dynamics of oral interaction (transmission ↔ action to occur effectively, students need to learn how to listen attentively, accept not being able to understand reception ↔ action ↔ reaction) and have numerous communicate with a certain degree of accuracy thus con- everything, take into account the nonverbal cues of the opportunities to practise as it greatly influences the tributing to the development of the cross-curricular com- person speaking, and use pertinent nonverbal or verbal degree to which they can speak English. As they develop petency To communicate appropriately. reactions. When they take the initiative to transmit oral the competency, students spontaneously use functional messages in relevant situations, students may ask for language, compensatory and learning strategies, and help, request permission, express courtesy, agreement, visual and linguistic resources. Resources help expand CONTEXTS FOR LEARNING needs, feelings and interests, as well as share personal the range of exposure to new language. In a rich and experiences and research results. When they maintain stimulating linguistic environment, students do not have The learning contexts for this competency require: oral interaction, students keep the interaction going over to rely on memory alone; effective use of visual support a period of time. Initially, students mostly imitate models – opportunities to interact with peers and the teacher, in helps learners develop confidence and autonomy, and it of interaction and re-use functional language and strat- English only, from day one accelerates learning of authentic language. In order to egies in appropriate situations; these exchanges are short maintain the use of English during class time, students – numerous occasions to practise and experiment with in duration. As students progress through the cycles, they benefit from frequent and spontaneous input from the functional language broaden their knowledge of the language and their teacher as a model and facilitator, the help of their peers, – opportunities to develop compensatory and learning repertoire of strategies, and they participate more active- the development of positive attitudes and a rich linguis- strategies through use ly and effectively in all kinds of interactive classroom sit- tic environment. uations. They take more risks when expressing them- – help from the teacher and peers selves, manage the resources at their disposal more – access to abundant visual support (posters, word and autonomously and find creative ways to employ func- expression banks, checklists, etc.) tional language to produce personalized messages. – availability of linguistic resources (texts, visual and the- matic dictionaries, Internet sites, etc.) – opportunities to take risks as a learner
  5. 5. Key Features of the Competency Evaluation Criteria – Use of functional language ➋ ➌ The student takes the initiative to tra n s m i t – Use of strategies ➋ ➌ oral messages using stratégies – Participation in exchanges ➋ ➌ The student reacts to messages using stra t e g i e s – Pronunciation ➋ ➌ Legend* : ➋ Cycle Two ➌ Cycle Three TO INTERACT ORALLY * This legend also applies to the Evaluation Criteria of other IN ENGLISH competencies as well as to the Essential Knowledge. The student maintains oral interaction using strategies End-of-Cycle Outcomes CYCLE TWO the cycle autonomously and apply some learning strat- spontaneous or initiated by the teacher. Students make egies with the teacher’s assistance. With help from peers creative use of a wide range of functional language and By the end of Cycle Two, students use the functional lan- and the teacher, they make effective use of the visual communicate personal messages more easily. They cor- guage they have acquired in order to participate in support and linguistic resources provided. rectly use the functional language frequently employed in exchanges with peers and the teacher (reacting to mes- class, with a pronunciation that can be understood by an sages, initiating messages, maintaining interaction). The CYCLE THREE English speaker. They frequently use appropriate compen- exchanges stem from any classroom situation. They are satory and learning strategies. They seek help from peers short in duration and may be spontaneous or initiated by By the end of Cycle Three, students show confidence and and not as often from the teacher. They select and make the teacher. Students are able to correctly use the func- autonomy: they interact more spontaneously and effec- use of available visual support and linguistic resources. tional language frequently employed in class, and their tively (reacting to messages, initiating messages, m a i n- pronunciation can be understood by an English speaker. taining interaction). The exchanges stem from any class- Students apply the compensatory strategies targeted for room situation and are more sustained. They may be Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 355
  6. 6. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 356 COMPETENCY 2 • TO REINVEST UNDERSTANDING OF ORAL AND WRITTEN TEXTS Focus of the Competency the cross-curricular competency To use effective work MEANING OF THE COMPETENCY DEVELOPMENTAL PROFILE methods. Depending on the task to be performed, s t u- dents may use ICTs, thus leading to the cross-curricular This competency enables elementary students to competency To use Information and Communications To develop this competency, students prepare to listen to approach, explore and make use of various types of texts Technologies. and read texts using strategies, demonstrate understand- (popular, literary, information-based) in a dynamic way. ing of oral and written texts using strategies, and carry They develop appropriate strategies for effective listening out meaningful tasks using strategies. This process calls and reading; they learn how to derive meaning from oral CONTEXTS FOR LEARNING on their creativity, initiative and active participation. At and written texts (interaction of learner and text); and first, students are closely guided by the teacher. When they show their understanding in meaningful tasks (mini- they prepare to listen to and read texts, students use their The learning contexts for this competency require: book, bookmark, sketch, poster, etc.). This competency is prior knowledge, contextual cues (title, subtitles, illustra- a valuable means for students to discover English-lan- – various types of texts containing redundant elements: tions, table of contents, synopsis, etc.) and make predic- guage culture as they familiarize themselves with a - simple and extensively illustrated (Cycle Two) tions about the content of texts. To demonstrate under- variety of cultural products. In doing so, students make standing of oral and written texts, students identify key - of appropriate complexity and illustrated (Cycle use of various media (books, brochures, magazines, elements, show their understanding of the overall mean- Three) videos, educational TV shows, audiocassettes, CD-ROMs, ing, compare reality presented in texts with their own software, Internet sites, etc.) as sources of information, – themes that are familiar and interesting reality, and express their appreciation of texts. When stu- entertainment and pleasure. – themes that meet the students’ need for information dents carry out tasks in which they reinvest their under- and entertainment (Cycle Three) standing, they plan how to do it and use texts as sources of ideas and information. As they progress through the CONNECTIONS TO CROSS-CURRICULAR COMPETENCIES – opportunities to develop appropriate compensatory cycles, the level of complexity of the text is adjusted and learning strategies through use according to the cognitive and linguistic development of To reinvest understanding of oral and written texts, s t u- – opportunities to interact with peers and the teacher the learner. Students become more autonomous; they dents need to identify key elements and to distinguish seek help from their peers and not as often from the – availability of resources (visual, linguistic and media) between relevant and irrelevant information, thus draw- teacher. ing upon the cross-curricular competency To use infor - – help from the teacher and peers mation. As students reinvest their understanding in tasks, they need to plan the steps that will lead to the fulfill- ment of tasks, thus contributing to the development of
  7. 7. Key Features of the Competency Evaluation Criteria – Use of strategies ➋ ➌ – Demonstration of understanding of key 2. The student demonstra t e s understanding of oral and elements and overall meaning ➋ ➌ 1. The student pre p a res to listen to and re a d written texts using strategies – Carrying out tasks ➋ ➌ texts using stra t e g i e s TO REINVEST UNDERSTANDING OF ORAL AND WRITTEN TEXTS 3. The student carries out meaningful tasks using strategies End-of-Cycle Outcomes CYCLE TWO CYCLE THREE By the end of Cycle Two, students demonstrate their By the end of Cycle Three, students demonstrate their understanding of various types of texts. Using functional understanding of various types of texts. They frequently language and words drawn from texts, they identify and use contextual cues and appropriate strategies briefly describe certain key elements and demonstrate autonomously. Using functional language and words understanding of the overall meaning. They sometimes drawn from texts, they identify and briefly describe key use contextual cues autonomously. They also apply some elements and demonstrate understanding of the overall learning strategies with the help of peers and the teacher. meaning. Students reinvest their understanding and plan Students reinvest their understanding by carrying out how to carry out tasks. They select, organize and summa- tasks: they use texts and available resources as sources of rize information, develop ideas and expand their range of ideas and information, compare reality presented in texts words and expressions using texts and ava i l a b l e with their own and deliver a personalized product. resources, and express appreciation of the reality pre- sented in texts. They deliver a personalized product. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 357
  8. 8. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 358 COMPETENCY 3 • TO WRITE TEXTS Focus of the Competency MEANING OF THE COMPETENCY CONTEXTS FOR LEARNING DEVELOPMENTAL PROFILE This competency enables elementary students to write The learning contexts for this competency require: To develop this competency, students prepare to write for purposes that are significant to them (greeting cards, texts using strategies, compose texts using strategies and – meaningful situations (purpose and intended audi- comic strips, class yearbook, Web page, e-mail, etc.). revise their texts using strategies. At first, they are close- ence) Using models as guides and sources of inspiration, they ly guided by the teacher. When they prepare to write, s t u- start expressing themselves in written English while pay- – opportunities to develop compensatory and learning dents follow instructions, note ideas and organize them. ing attention to the quality of their writing.The aim is not strategies through use To compose a first draft, they use explicit models, f u n c- to have students systematically learn language conven- – availability of resources (explicit models Cycle Two, tional language, words, expressions and ideas drawn tions, but to apply them to the composition of texts while open-ended models Cycle Three, checklists, word from provided resources. They ask for help when experi- having access to a variety of resources. To do so, students banks, posters, visual and thematic dictionaries, self- encing difficulty, take risks in expressing ideas in English are initiated to writing as a process and benefit from correction grids, etc.) and persevere in producing this first draft. To revise, they teamwork and teacher assistance throughout the check the task instructions and the language conventions – opportunities to interact with peers and the teacher process. targeted, submit the text to peer editing, reformulate – help from the teacher and peers ideas, make corrections, and produce a clean, well-pre- – use of ICT sented text that takes the intended audience into CONNECTIONS TO CROSS-CURRICULAR COMPETENCIES account. As they progress through the cycles, students develop an awareness of strategies for effective writing. To write texts, students draw upon the cross-curricular They make use of open-ended models and make person- competencies To use effective work methods, To use al and appropriate use of functional language, words, information and To communicate appropriately. As stu- expressions and ideas found in available resources. They dents carry out a writing task, they make effective use of become more autonomous, seeking help from their peers software such as visual and thematic dictionaries, word and not as often from the teacher, and deliver a person- processors, and desktop publishing programs, thereby alized text taking the intended audience into account. contributing to the development of the cross-curricular competency To use Information and Communication Technologies (ICT).
  9. 9. Key Features of the Competency Evaluation Criteria – Use of strategies ➋ ➌ – Compliance with instructions ➋ ➌ 1. The student prepares to write – Language conventions targeted for tasks ➋ ➌ texts using strategies – Characteristics of final product ➋ ➌ 2. The student composes texts using strategies TO WRITE TEXTS 3. The student revises his or her texts using strategies End-of-Cycle Outcomes CYCLE TWO CYCLE THREE By the end of Cycle Two, students write short, well-struc- By the end of Cycle Three, students write a variety of well- tured texts to fulfill meaningful goals. They use some structured texts to fulfill meaningful goals. Supported by compensatory and learning strategies supported by peers peers and the teacher, students make greater and more and the teacher. Students follow an explicit model and confident use of compensatory and learning strategies. make use of resources provided. They produce a text that They produce a text that is pertinent to the instructions is pertinent to the instructions given and apply the lan- given and apply the language conventions targeted for guage conventions targeted for the task. Although the the task. From an open-ended model and available writing closely resembles the explicit model, students resources, students deliver a personalized final product deliver a personalized final product to the intended that shows imagination and creativity, and takes the audience. intended audience into account. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 359
  10. 10. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 360 Essential Knowledge The study program is centred on students and their construction of knowledge, and draws upon the following categories. FUNCTIONAL LANGUAGE • USEFUL EXPRESSIONS – Suggestions, invitations (e.g. Do you want to be my partner? Let’s . . ., Come to my party. Do you want to work with me?) ➋ ➌ – Instructions and classroom routines (e.g. Open your binder. Let’s – Expressions to make rejoinders (e.g. It’s your turn. What about you? write the date.) ➋ ➌ What do you think? Repeat what you said.) ➋ ➌ – Delay speaking (e.g. Wait a minute. I’m not ready. I’m not sure. Let’s – Expressions promoting harmonious exchanges and teamwork see now. Let me think about it. Well, . . .) ➋ ➌ (e.g. That’s a good idea! You’re a good partner! Well done! Wow! – Asking for help or clarification (e.g. Can you help me? I need some Smart! You’re a genius! Way to go, team! Let’s go, gang! Great help. I have a problem. I don’t understand. Can you repeat? How teamwork! Not too loud! There are five minutes left. Do we have do you say . . .? What do you mean? What’s . . .?) ➋ ➌ our pencils?) ➋ ➌ – Circumlocution (e.g. Give me the big object. You know, that • VOCABULARY red thing.) ➋ ➌ – Identification (e.g. What’s this? This is . . ., It’s . . ., My name is . . ., – Vocabulary related to action words frequently used in class ➋ ➌ Who is it? I am/ I’m . . ., There is/There’s . . .) ➋ ➌ – Vocabulary related to the immediate environment (e.g. classroom, – Capabilities (e.g. I can . . ., I can’t . . ., I’m good at . . ., I’m not good premises, school staff, identification and description of self and others) ➋ ➌ at . . ., Can you . . .?) ➋ ➌ – Theme-related vocabulary (e.g. sports, recreation, pastimes, food, – Requests for information ( e . g . Where . . .? Who . . .? What . . .? animals, clothing, special events) ➋ ➌ Do you have . . .?) ➋ ➌ – Personal pronouns ➋ ➌ – Agreement, disagreement, opinions (e.g. That’s right. Maybe! – Alphabet ➋ ➌ Do you agree? I think . . .) ➋ ➌ – Cardinal numbers ➋ ➌ – Permission (e.g. May I go . . . ? Can I have . . . ?) ➋ ➌ – Ordinal numbers: first to thirty-first, last ➋ ➌ – Offers of assistance, needs (e.g. Can I help you? May I . . . – Colours and shapes ➋ ➌ Can I . . .? I need . . ., Can you . . .?) ➋ ➌ – Prepositions and location words (e.g. left, right, in, on, under, – Warnings (e.g. Careful! Look out! Watch out! Stop!) ➋ ➌ behind, in front of, beside, between) ➋ ➌ – Feelings, interests, tastes, preferences (e.g. I’m happy. I’m sad. I’m – Expressions of time (e.g. years, months, weeks, days of the week, excited. I like . . ., I love . . ., Do you like . . .? What’s your number of minutes, hours, seasons) ➋ ➌ favourite . . .? I like . . .the best. I prefer . . .) ➋ ➌ – Question words (e.g. who, what, when, where, why, how many) ➋ ➌ – Expressions of courtesy, social conventions and gestures: greetings, – Yes/no questions (e.g. Do you have . . .? Do you want . . .? introducing, leave-taking, thanking, apologizing (e.g. Hi! Good Do you like . . .?) ➋ ➌ morning! So long!) ➋ ➌
  11. 11. STRATEGIES – Note-taking (writing down relevant information) ➋ ➌ – Skimming (reading through a text quickly to get an overview of it) ➋ ➌ • COMPENSATORY – Scanning (looking for specific information in a text) ➋ ➌ – Delay speaking (buying time to think out a response) ➋ ➌ – Cooperation (working together, learning together, helping each other) ➋ ➌ – Asking for help or clarification (requesting assistance, repetition or precision ) ➋ ➌ – Risk-taking (daring to speak English only, experimenting with known language, attempting to integrate new language) ➋ ➌ – Circumlocution (making up for the lack of a precise word or expression) ➌ – Accepting not being able to understand everything listened to or re a d ➋ ➌ • LEARNING – Self-monitoring (questioning the pronunciation of new words LANGUAGE CONVENTIONS read or heard, using and selecting the appropriate strategies, checking and adjusting one’s ongoing performance) ➋ ➌ • (GRAMMAR, PHONOLOGY, PUNCTUATION AND SPELLING) – Self-evaluation (reflection on what has been learned) ➋ ➌ – Word order: ➋ ➌ – Planning (asking oneself: What am I supposed to do? In what order? - simple sentence ➋ ➌ What resources do I need? What could I listen to or read? What should - position of adjective (e.g. red book) ➋ ➌ I say or write? How will I say it or write it?) ➋ ➌ – Regular plurals (e.g. book—books) ➋ ➌ – Attention (paying attention and concentrating on the right things) ➋ ➌ – Articles ➋ ➌ – Use of prior knowledge (drawing on one’s background knowledge – Verb tenses (e.g. imperative, present progressive, present indicative, as a source of information) ➋ ➌ past, future) ➋ ➌ – Predicting (foretelling based on prior knowledge, topic, task at hand, – Intonation and pronunciation for the functional language frequently title, pictures, glancing through a text) ➋ ➌ used in class ➋ ➌ – Infering (making intelligent guesses based on all available cues such – Punctuation: capital letter at the beginning of a sentence, period at the as context, cognates, known words and expressions, visual clues, end of a sentence, question mark, commas between items in an contextual cues, intonation, patterns) ➋ ➌ enumeration ➋ ➌ – Practice (repeating, rehearsing, regrouping, integrating and – Spellings: assimilating key functional language expressions) ➋ ➌ - found in explicit models and resources targeted for carrying – Resourcing (making use of human and material resources: word out tasks ➋ ➌ and expression banks, graphic organizers, posters, checklists, quick - found in open-ended models and resources targeted for carrying references, books, thematic and visual dictionaries, information out tasks ➋ ➌ technology) ➋ ➌ Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 361
  12. 12. Domaine des langues English as a Second Language 362 TEXT COMPONENTS Use of Information and – Connecting words (e.g. once upon a time, first, next, finally, and they Communications Technologies lived happily ever after, two years later, on my way home, and, but, if) ➋ ➌ – Contextual cues: titles, subtitles, synopsis, key sentences, illustrations, The following ICT can be used with: table of contents ➋ ➌ Competency 1, To interact orally in English – Overall meaning ➋ ➌ – Use of computer with one or more partners to carry out various activities – Key elements: – Use of interactive CD-ROMs, software and Internet sites to practise spoken English - person, character, animal, object, place, setting ➋ - facts, plot, storyline, sequence of events ➌ – Use of a digital video camera to film interviews, sketches and other activities – Correspondence by voice e-mail CULTURAL PRODUCTS Competency 2, To reinvest understanding of oral and written texts – Texts, media, games (e.g. nursery rhymes, stories, songs, books, biographical – Use of interactive stories, encyclopedias and visual dictionaries on CD-ROMs and sketches, films, games, magazines, poems, CD-ROMs, educational TV, DVDs Internet sites) ➋ ➌ – Use of entertaining Internet sites: stories, songs, news about famous people, etc. – Famous people (e.g. authors, actors, astronauts, singers, athletes, visual artists, heroes, inventors, scientists, historical characters) ➋ ➌ – Use of Internet sites for consultation, data-gathering and documentary research – Origin of names (e.g. family names, businesses) ➋ ➌ – Following instructions and procedures on the computer to carry out activities – Landmarks (e.g. buildings, bridges, statues, businesses, streets, villages, – Production of videos towns and cities) ➋ ➌ – Use of CD-ROMs, interactive software and Internet sites to consolidate and enrich – Traditions related to celebrations and special events (e.g. birthdays, learning Halloween, Christmas, Earth Day, Thanksgiving, St. Patrick’s Day) ➋ ➌ Competency 3, To write texts – Idiomatic expressions (e.g. He’s on cloud nine. It’s raining cats and dogs. – Use of word-processing, drawing and publishing software Break a leg. The cat’s got her tongue. That rings a bell.) ➋ ➌ – Use of reference tools on CD-ROMs, DVDs and Internet – Publication of information on Web pages – Participation in discussion forums – Correspondence by e-mail
  13. 13. Notes
  14. 14. Notes
  15. 15. Ministère 13-0003-07 de l’Éducation

×