Ecology RICA & Graphic Organizers

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Ecology RICA & Graphic Organizers

  1. 1. Teaching Ecology The use of writing and graphic organizers in the high school classroom
  2. 2. Georgia Standards <ul><ul><ul><li>SB2. Students will assess the dependence of all organisms on one another and the flow of energy and matter within their ecosystems. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This is a “large” standard with six sub-categories, covering subjects from food webs to human impacts. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It is a vocabulary-rich topic with many subtle concepts. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Reading in Content Area <ul><li>Three major categories of reading: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In-depth “book reading” aka Biodiversity , Dorothy Hinshaw Patent, 1996 Clarion Books </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Magazine article reading aka Discover Magazine (various current articles) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web synopsis reading,aka industrialecology.blogspot.com </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. In-depth Book Reading <ul><li>Entire units can be designed around reading a book chapter-by-chapter with activities </li></ul><ul><li>Chapters give a framework for activities while introducing vocabulary in context. </li></ul><ul><li>See “Books, Biodiversity and Beyond” in Science Scope , vol 30 #5, Jan 2007 </li></ul>
  5. 5. Magazine Articles <ul><li>National Geographic, Discover, and others have relevant ecology articles </li></ul><ul><li>Good focus for a single lesson - read, summarize, critique </li></ul><ul><li>Consider a prepared three-level guide (described later) for the article </li></ul>
  6. 6. Web Synopses <ul><li>These are “short-short” articles summarizing a research area usually in 300 words or less -- suitable for Web attention spans. </li></ul><ul><li>Have several printed or online -- have students choose “most promising” or “most interesting” innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Consider an individual or group WebQuest to explore their choice in-depth </li></ul>
  7. 7. Organized Reading <ul><li>Standard textbook ‘guided reading’ is often just vocabulary search </li></ul><ul><li>Instead have students build a concept map from the bold vocabulary terms they encounter - must scaffold this </li></ul><ul><li>Alternatives: Venn diagrams or compare/contrast matrices to compare major categories </li></ul><ul><li>Consider having students come up with one open question (unanswered in the text) during the reading activity - then select and discuss </li></ul>
  8. 8. Graphic Organizers <ul><li>Example of “color-your-own” graphic organizer for ecology levels </li></ul><ul><li>Nests biosphere, biome, ecosystem, community, population, individual </li></ul><ul><li>Personal creative effort invests students in the model. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Graphic Organizers <ul><li>Example of “color-your-own” graphic organizer for ecology levels </li></ul><ul><li>Nests biosphere, biome, ecosystem, community, population, individual </li></ul><ul><li>Personal creative effort invests students in the model. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Graphic Organizers <ul><li>Example of “color-your-own” graphic organizer for ecology levels </li></ul><ul><li>Nests biosphere, biome, ecosystem, community, population, individual </li></ul><ul><li>Personal creative effort invests students in the model. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Graphic Organizers <ul><li>Example of “color-your-own” graphic organizer for ecology levels </li></ul><ul><li>Nests biosphere, biome, ecosystem, community, population, individual </li></ul><ul><li>Personal creative effort invests students in the model. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Graphic Organizers <ul><li>Example of “color-your-own” graphic organizer for ecology levels </li></ul><ul><li>Nests biosphere, biome, ecosystem, community, population, individual </li></ul><ul><li>Personal creative effort invests students in the model. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Graphic Organizers <ul><li>Example of “color-your-own” graphic organizer for ecology levels </li></ul><ul><li>Nests biosphere, biome, ecosystem, community, population, individual </li></ul><ul><li>Personal creative effort invests students in the model. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Graphic Organizers <ul><li>Example of “color-your-own” graphic organizer for ecology levels </li></ul><ul><li>Nests biosphere, biome, ecosystem, community, population, individual </li></ul><ul><li>Personal creative effort invests students in the model. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Writing Activities <ul><li>Real-world linkages: essential for ecology. Have students identify a local ecological issue and write about it, incorporating key vocabulary terms. </li></ul><ul><li>RAFT (Role, Audience, Form, Topic) writing: put yourself in a particular role (land developer? homeowner?) to write a persuasive letter to a select audience on an ecological topic. Have different students play conflicting roles in the same scenario. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Reading Guides <ul><li>“ Three-Level Guide” asks one set of questions at the literal level, one set at interpretive level, and one set at applied/synthesis level -- all related to the same reading. </li></ul><ul><li>Compare/Contrast matrix - much like the “product comparison” matrixes, they let major concepts be compared side-by-side by a set of attributes or characteristics. </li></ul>
  17. 17. References <ul><li>Vacca & Vacca, Content Area Reading: Literacy & Learning Across the Curriculum , 9th ed. Pearson Edu. </li></ul><ul><li>Dorothy Hinshaw Patent, Biodiversity, Clarion Books 2003 </li></ul>

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