Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Math Gr4 Ch9

3,314 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Having proven experience from school level to Phd level to all kid of subjects: Calculus,Statistics,Algebra,Trigonometry,Geometry,Natural numbers/Integers Rational/Real/Complex/numbers,Algebraic geometry,Set theory,Differential geometry,Numerical analysis,Theory of computation,Graph theory,Dynamical systems,Probability ,Recursion theory / Number theory,Electrical / Electronics / Civil Engineering,MATLAB / MATLAB Simulation,Calculus / Differential equations,SAS / SPSS / STATA,Economics / Finance / Statistics,C, C++, C# and Programming,Computer Science,PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, AND BIOLOGY HELP WITH LAB My team worked over more than 100 universities and over 2000 projects of different subjects. We worked on coursecompass, mathxl, webassign, mymathlab, Phoenix, wileyplus, mathxl, floridatechonline, online.sdccd, straighterline and many more Approach to the Job: #As you required academic-style paper for a website. don'twary I Hvae in house team over five years expirence in accedmic writeing, I a sure done your acedmic content on time with in your budgets please go to our website..and see our sample work.. Our unique features 100% Moneyback Guarantee Plagiarism Free Guarantee Free revisions according to our Revision Policy Free title page Free bibliography & reference Free formatting (APA, MLA, Chicago, Harvard and others) 24/7 Customer Support Please let me know a suitable time for further discussion. Waiting for your quick response and want to start healthy long term relationship with you. Regards Nisha Verma http://www.cheapassignmenthelp.com/
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Math Gr4 Ch9

  1. 1. Chapter 9 Divide by a One-Digit Number Click the mouse or press the space bar to continue.
  2. 2. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 Lesson 9-1 Division with Remainders Lesson 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Lesson 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Lesson 9-4 Estimate Quotients Lesson 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Lesson 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Lesson 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients Lesson 9-8 Quotients with Zeros Lesson 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers
  3. 3. 9-1 Division with Remainders Five-Minute Check (over Chapter 8) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2 Example 3
  4. 4. 9-1 Division with Remainders • I will carry out division with and without remainders.
  5. 5. 9-1 Division with Remainders Preparation for Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi- digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  6. 6. 9-1 Division with Remainders José wants to change the buttons on his school uniform shirts. Each shirt has 7 buttons. He bought a package of 84 buttons. On how many shirts will he be able to change the buttons. There are 84 buttons. Each shirt has 7 buttons. Find 84 7.
  7. 7. 9-1 Division with Remainders Step 1 Divide the tens. 7 84 Can 8 tens be divided equally into groups of 7? 1 7 84 Yes, there is one ten in each group.
  8. 8. 9-1 Division with Remainders Step 2 Multiply, subtract, and compare. 1 7 84 Multiply. 7 1 = 7 – 7 Subtract. 8 – 7 = 1 1 Compare. 1 < 7 Step 3 Bring down the ones. 1 7 84 Bring down 4 ones. – 7 14 14 ones in all.
  9. 9. 9-1 Division with Remainders Step 4 Divide the ones. 1 2 Divide. 14 7=2 7 84 Put 2 in the quotient. – 7 14 Multiply. 2 7 = 14 – Subtract. 14 – 14 = 0 14 0 Compare. 0 < 7 Answer: So, José will be able to change the buttons on 12 shirts.
  10. 10. 9-1 Division with Remainders Victor is making care packages with his charity group for students in college. He has a package of 54 travel size soaps. 2 soaps go in each care package. How many care packages will he be able be able to fill with soap? A. 17 B. 22 C. 25 D. 27
  11. 11. 9-1 Division with Remainders Find 48 ÷ 6. Step 1 Divide the tens. 6 48 Divide. 6 does not divide into 4. So, there are no tens in each group.
  12. 12. 9-1 Division with Remainders Step 2 Divide the ones. 8 R0 Divide. 48 6 = 8 6 48 So, 8 ones is in each group. – 48 Multiply. 8 6 = 48 0 Subtract. 48 – 48 = 0 Compare. 0 < 6 Remainder = 0 Answer: So, 48 6 = 8.
  13. 13. 9-1 Division with Remainders Find 77 5. A. 5 R2 B. 15 R2 C. 10 R0 D. 15 R0
  14. 14. 9-1 Division with Remainders Markus wants to go to the go-cart park with his friends. The group rate is $63 for 5 guests. How much will each person need to pay for their share of the group price? Step 1 Divide the tens. 1 Divide. 6 5 = 1 5 63 So, one tens is in each group. – 5 Multiply. 5 1 = 5 1 Subtract. 6 – 5 = 1 Compare. 1 < 5
  15. 15. 9-1 Division with Remainders Step 2 Divide the ones. 1 2 Bring down the ones. R3 5 63 Divide. 13 5 = 2 – 5 Put 2 in the quotient. 13 Multiply. 5 2 = 10 – 10 Subtract. 13 – 10 = 3 3 Compare. 3 < 5 Remainder = 3 Answer: So, each person will have to pay a little over $12.
  16. 16. 9-1 Division with Remainders Six friends went to the movies together. The total cost for the movies is $44. How much does each person have to pay? A. a little over $6 B. exactly $6 C. a little over $7 D. exactly $7
  17. 17. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 9-1) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2
  18. 18. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 • I will use basic facts and patterns to divide mentally.
  19. 19. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  20. 20. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 The factory line just completed 600 wheels for their tricycles. How many tricycles can they make with the 600 wheels? Each tricycle has 3 wheels, so you need to divide 600 by 3.
  21. 21. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 One Way: Use a Multiplication Pattern 3×2=6 6÷3=2 3 × 20 = 60 60 ÷ 3 = 20 3 × 200 = 600 600 ÷ 3 = 200
  22. 22. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Another Way: Use a Basic Fact 6÷3=2 basic fact 60 ÷ 3 = 20 600 ÷ 3 = 200 Answer: So, the factory can make 200 tricycles.
  23. 23. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Fred collects coins and puts them in an album. He has 400 coins. If 8 coins fit on a page, how many pages does he have filled in the album? A. 5 B. 40 C. 50 D. 500
  24. 24. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Find the quotient of 3,200 and 80. One Way: Use a Multiplication Pattern 8 × 4 = 32 32 ÷ 8 = 4 80 × 4 = 320 320 ÷ 80 = 4 80 × 40 = 3,200 3,200 ÷ 80 = 40
  25. 25. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Another Way: Use a Basic Fact The basic fact for 3,200 ÷ 80 is 32 ÷ 8. 32 ÷ 8 = 4 basic fact 320 ÷ 80 = 4 3,200 ÷ 80 = 40 Answer: So, the quotient is 40.
  26. 26. 9-2 Divide Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Find the quotient of 6,300 and 70. A. 90 B. 900 C. 9,000 D. 80
  27. 27. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 9-2) Main Idea California Standards Example 1: Problem-Solving Strategy
  28. 28. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check • I will solve problems by using the guess and check strategy.
  29. 29. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Standard 4MR1.1 Analyze problems by identifying relationships, distinguishing relevant from irrelevant information, sequencing and prioritizing information, and observing patterns.
  30. 30. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Standard 4NS3.0 Students solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers and understand the relationships among the operations.
  31. 31. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Ruben bought 3 gifts for his sisters. Two of the gifts cost the same. The other gift costs $3 more than the other two. If the total amount or money spent was $27, how much did each gift cost?
  32. 32. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Understand What facts do you know? • There are 3 gifts, and two gifts cost the same. • One gift is $3 more than the other two. • Ruben spent $27 on all 3 gifts. What do you need to find? • The cost of each gift.
  33. 33. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Plan You can guess and check to solve the problem.
  34. 34. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Solve Use gift + gift + (gift + $3) = $27 and make logical guesses. Start with numbers smaller than $10 because $10 × 3 = $30 and the total is less than $30.
  35. 35. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Solve Try $9. $9 + $9 + ($9 + $3) = $30 No, too large. Try $8. $8 + $8 + ($8 + $3) = $27 yes Answer: So, two gifts cost $8 each and the third gift costs $8 + $3, or $11.
  36. 36. 9-3 Problem-Solving Strategy: Guess and Check Check Subtract the cost of each gift from the total cost. First gift: $27 – $8 = $19 Second gift: $19 – $8 = $11 Third gift: $11 – $11 = $0 So, the answer is correct.
  37. 37. 9-4 Estimate Quotients Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 9-3) Main Idea and Vocabulary California Standards Example 1 Example 2
  38. 38. 9-4 Estimate Quotients • I will estimate quotients. • compatible numbers
  39. 39. 9-4 Estimate Quotients Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  40. 40. 9-4 Estimate Quotients A small wading pool holds 225 gallons of water and it takes 3 hours to fill. About how many gallons are put into the pool in one hour? Estimate the quotient of 225 and 3.
  41. 41. 9-4 Estimate Quotients One Way: Compatible Numbers 225 ÷ 3 210 ÷ 3 = 70 3 × 7 = 21
  42. 42. 9-4 Estimate Quotients Another Way: Basic Facts 225 ÷ 3 3 × 7 = 21 3 × 70 = 210 210 ÷ 3 = 70
  43. 43. 9-4 Estimate Quotients Answer: So, about 70 gallons of water are put into the pool in one hour.
  44. 44. 9-4 Estimate Quotients Estimate 310 5. A. 5 B. 50 C. 6 D. 60
  45. 45. 9-4 Estimate Quotients The hotdog stand at the school carnival earned $1,315 today and sold only $4 combination meals. About how many meals did they sell?
  46. 46. 9-4 Estimate Quotients One Way: Compatible Numbers $1,315 ÷ $4 $1,200 ÷ $4 = 300 4 × 3 = 12
  47. 47. 9-4 Estimate Quotients Another Way: Basic Facts $1,315 ÷ $4 4 × 3 = 12 4 × 30 = 120 4 × 300 = 1,200 $1,200 ÷ $4 = 300
  48. 48. 9-4 Estimate Quotients Answer: So, they sold about 300 meals.
  49. 49. 9-4 Estimate Quotients Estimate 1,700 8. A. 100 B. 200 C. 300 D. 400
  50. 50. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 9-4) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2
  51. 51. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients • I will divide a two-digit dividend by a one-digit number.
  52. 52. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Preparation for Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi- digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  53. 53. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Standard 4MR2.1 Use estimation to verify the reasonableness of calculated results.
  54. 54. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients There are 96 cans of tennis balls in 4 boxes. How many cans are in each box? Estimate 96 ÷ 4 100 ÷ 4 = 25 Step 1 Divide the tens. 2 Divide. 9 4 = 2 Put 2 in the quotient. 4 96 –8 Multiply. 4 2 = 8 1 Subtract. 9 – 8 = 1 Compare. 1 < 4
  55. 55. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Step 2 Divide the ones. 2 4 Bring R0 the ones. down 4 96 Divide. 16 4 = 4 –8 Put 4 in the quotient. 1 6 Multiply. 4 4 = 16 – Subtract. 16 – 16 = 0 16 0 Compare. 0 < 4 Remainder = 0 Answer: So, 96 4 = 24. The answer is reasonable because it is close to the estimate of 25.
  56. 56. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients There are 102 packs of crackers in 5 cases. How many packs are in each case? A. 22 B. 20 R2 C. 12 D. 10 R2
  57. 57. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Shelley and 6 of her friends are using beads to make necklaces. She has 338 beads to share. How many beads will each of them get? There are 338 beads and 7 friends (Shelley and 6 of her friends). Divide 338 ÷ 7. Estimate 338 ÷ 7 350 ÷ 7 = 50
  58. 58. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Step 1 Estimate to place the first digit. x 7 338 7 338
  59. 59. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Step 2 Divide the tens. 4 Divide. 33 7 = 4 7 338 Put 4 in the quotient. – 28 Multiply. 7 4 = 28 5 Subtract. 33 – 28 = 5 Compare. 5 < 7
  60. 60. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Step 3 Divide the ones. 4 8 Bring down the ones. R2 7 338 Divide. 58 7 = 8 – 28 8 in the quotient. Put 58 Multiply. 7 8 = 56 – Subtract. 58 – 56 = 2 56 2 Compare. 2 < 7 Remainder = 2 Answer: So, each person will get 48 beads and 2 will be left over. The answer, 48 R2, is close to the estimate, so the answer is reasonable.
  61. 61. 9-5 Two-Digit Quotients Lupe and 5 of his friends are looking at baseball cards at his house. If Lupe has 491 baseball cards, and he splits them evenly between him and his friends evenly to look at, how many cards does each person get? A. 81 R5 B. 81 R3 C. 72 R0 D. 71 R5
  62. 62. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 9-5) Main Idea California Standards Example 1: Problem-Solving Investigation
  63. 63. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy • I will choose the best strategy to solve a problem.
  64. 64. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Standard 4MR1.1 Analyze problems by identifying relationships, distinguishing relevant from irrelevant information, sequencing and prioritizing information, and observing patterns.
  65. 65. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Standard 4NS3.0 Students solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers and understand the relationships among the operations.
  66. 66. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy CINDY: I had some stamps. I bought 6 more stamps. I traded 4 of my stamps for 8 of my friend’s stamps. I now have 32 stamps. YOUR MISSION: Find how many stamps Cindy started with.
  67. 67. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Understand What facts do you know? • Cindy bought 6 stamps. • She traded 4 stamps for 8 stamps. • She now has 32 stamps. What do you need to find? • Find the number of stamps Cindy started with.
  68. 68. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Plan You need to find how many stamps Cindy started with. So, the work backward strategy is a good choice.
  69. 69. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Solve Start with the end result, then work backwards one step at a time. End result stamps Cindy has now stamps Cindy received from a friend
  70. 70. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Solve stamps Cindy gave to a friend stamps Cindy bought Answer: 22 stamps
  71. 71. 9-6 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Check Look back at the problem. Cindy gained 14 stamps and lost 4. This means she has 10 more stamps then she started with. If she now has 32 stamps, then she started with 22 stamps. The answer is correct.
  72. 72. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 9-6) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2
  73. 73. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients • I will divide a three-digit dividend by a one-digit number.
  74. 74. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  75. 75. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients A teacher orders pencils in large plastic jars. Each jar holds 276 pencils. To how many students can he give 2 pencils? Estimate 276 2 280 ÷ 2 = 140 Step 1 Divide the hundreds. 1 Divide. 2 2 = 1 2 276 Put 1 in the quotient. –2 Multiply. 2 1 = 2 0 Subtract. 2 – 2 = 0 Compare. 0 < 2
  76. 76. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients Step 2 Divide the tens. 13 Bring down the tens. 2 276 Divide. 7 2 = 3 –2 Put 3 in the quotient. 07 Multiply. 3 2 = 6 –6 Subtract. 7 – 6 = 1 1 Compare. 1 < 2
  77. 77. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients Step 3 Divide the ones. 13 8 Bring down the ones. 2 276 Divide. 16 2 = 8 –2 Put 8 in the quotient. 07 –6 16 Multiply. 8 2 = 16 – 16 Subtract. 16 – 16 = 0 0 Compare. 0 < 2 Answer: So, 138 students can receive 2 pencils. Since the answer, 138, is close to the estimate of 140, the answer is reasonable.
  78. 78. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients Find 322 2. A. 61 B. 161 C. 111 D. 121
  79. 79. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients The principal wants to form reading groups of 4 for 567 students. How many groups will be formed? To find how many groups will be formed, divide 567 by 4. Estimate 567 4 560 ÷ 4 = 140
  80. 80. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients 14 1 R3 4 567 –4 16 – 16 07 – 4 3 Answer: So, 141 groups will be formed with 3 people left over. The answer is close to the estimate of 140, so the answer is reasonable.
  81. 81. 9-7 Three-Digit Quotients A group of 892 volunteers want to split up into groups of 8 to do different community service projects. How many groups will be formed? A. 112 R4 B. 121 R4 C. 111 R4 D. 111 R5
  82. 82. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 9-7) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2
  83. 83. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros • I will divide with zeros in the quotients.
  84. 84. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  85. 85. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros Rita is using 315 beads to make beaded necklaces for 3 of her friends. If each necklace has the same number of beads, how many beads will each necklace have? You need to find 315 ÷ 3. Step 1 Divide the hundreds. 1 Divide. 3 3 = 1 3 315 Put 1 in the quotient. –3 Multiply. 3 1 = 3 0 Subtract. 3 – 3 = 0 Compare. 0 < 3
  86. 86. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros Step 2 Divide the tens. 10 Bring down the tens. 3 315 Divide. Since 1 < 3, there is not enough –3 to divide. So, put 0 in the quotient. 01 Multiply. 3 0 = 0 –0 Subtract. 1 – 0 = 1 1 Compare. 1 < 3
  87. 87. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros Step 3 Divide the ones. 10 5 Bring down the ones. 3 315 Divide. 15 3 = 5 –3 Put 5 in the quotient. 01 –0 15 Multiply. 3 5 = 15 – 15 Subtract. 15 – 15 = 0 0 Compare. 0 < 3 Answer: So, each necklace will have 105 beads.
  88. 88. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros Felix bowled 327 in 3 games of bowling. If he scored the same for each game, what was his score for each game? A. 118 B. 108 C. 119 D. 109
  89. 89. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros The camping club spent $217 on 2 large tents. How much did each tent cost? To find the cost of each tent, you need to find 217 ÷ 2. Estimate 217 2 220 ÷ 2 = 110
  90. 90. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros 10 8 R1 2 217 –2 01 – 0 17 Remember to divide, multiply, – 16 subtract, and compare. Then 1 bring down the next number in the dividend. Answer: So, the camping club spent a little over $108 for each tent. The answer is close to the estimate of 110, so the answer is reasonable.
  91. 91. 9-8 Quotients with Zeros A ski club spent $408 on 4 pairs of skis. What is the cost of each pair? A. $102 B. $103 C. $112 D. $113
  92. 92. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 9-8) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2
  93. 93. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers • I will divide four- and five-digit quotients by a one-digit number.
  94. 94. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  95. 95. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers Mrs. Chi wants to bundle 4 muffins in a package for a fundraiser at school. Parents donated 4,576 muffins. How many bundles will be ready to sell? To find the number of bundles, you need to find 4,576 4. Step 1 Divide the thousands. 1 Divide. 4 4 = 1 4 4,576 Put 1 in the quotient. –4 Multiply. 4 1 = 4 0 Subtract. 4 – 4 = 0 Compare. 1 < 4
  96. 96. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers Step 2 Divide the hundreds. 1,1 Bring down the hundreds. 4 4,576 Divide. 5 4 = 1 –4 05 Multiply. 4 1 = 4 – 4 Subtract. 5 – 4 = 1 1 Compare. 1 < 4
  97. 97. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers Step 3 Divide each place. 1,14 4 4 4,576 For each –4 place, multiply, subt 05 ract, and bring – 4 down. 7 1 – 16 1 6 – 16 0 Answer: So, 1,144 bundles will be ready to sell.
  98. 98. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers A cookie bake sale sold 5,705 cookies. If there were 5 cookies in every bundle that they sold, how many bundles of cookies did they sell? A. 1,101 B. 1,141 C. 1,241 D. 1,242
  99. 99. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers The school play earned $62,530 for the week. If admission costs $5 a ticket, how many tickets did they sell? To find the number of tickets sold, find 62,530 5. Estimate $62,530 $5 $60,000 ÷ $5 = 12,000
  100. 100. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers Divide each place. 12,506 5 62,530 For each place, divide, –5 multiply, subtract, and 12 compare. Then bring – 10 down the next digit in 5 2 the dividend. – 25 0 3 – 0 3 0 – 30 0
  101. 101. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers Answer: So, they sold 12,506 tickets. The answer is close to the estimate of 12,000, so the answer is reasonable.
  102. 102. 9-9 Divide Greater Numbers A baseball team made $33,615 after selling tickets for two weeks. If admission is $3, how many tickets did they sell? A. 10,205 B. 10,215 C. 11,215 D. 11,205
  103. 103. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 Five-Minute Checks
  104. 104. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 Lesson 9-1 (over Chapter 8) Lesson 9-2 (over Lesson 9-1) Lesson 9-3 (over Lesson 9-2) Lesson 9-4 (over Lesson 9-3) Lesson 9-5 (over Lesson 9-4) Lesson 9-6 (over Lesson 9-5) Lesson 9-7 (over Lesson 9-6) Lesson 9-8 (over Lesson 9-7) Lesson 9-9 (over Lesson 9-8)
  105. 105. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Chapter 8) Multiply 3,270 25. A. 1,510,350 B. 79,450 C. 81,750 D. 22,890
  106. 106. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Chapter 8) Multiply 5,741 53. A. 45,928 B. 302,173 C. 1,521,123 D. 304,273
  107. 107. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Chapter 8) Multiply 98,304 24. A. 2,169,296 B. 2,359,296 C. 589,824 D. 1,259,296
  108. 108. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Chapter 8) Multiply $34,811 45. A. $1,566,495 B. $87,979 C. $313,295 D. $1,466,495
  109. 109. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-1) Divide 68 2. A. 43 B. 66 C. 34 D. 64
  110. 110. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-1) Divide 78 3. A. 39 B. 62 C. 76 D. 26
  111. 111. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-1) Divide 59 5. A. 11 R4 B. 10 R9 C. 12 D. 12 R1
  112. 112. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-1) Divide 97 8. A. 21 R1 B. 12 R1 C. 11 R9 D. 10 R7
  113. 113. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-2) Divide 3,600 4. A. 9,000 B. 922 R2 C. 1,200 D. 900
  114. 114. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-2) Divide 490 7. A. 70 B. 155 R5 C. 140 D. 170
  115. 115. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-2) Divide 2,800 70. A. 4 B. 41 C. 40 D. 410
  116. 116. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-2) Divide 810 90. A. 90 B. 9 C. 99 D. 81
  117. 117. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-3) Solve. Use the Guess and Check strategy. A unicycle has one wheel and a bicycle has two. Steve walks into Hanson’s Cycling Shop and counts 19 unicycles and bicycles and 27 wheels. How many unicycles are there? A. 8 unicycles B. 9 unicycles C. 10 unicycles D. 11 unicycles
  118. 118. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-4) Estimate 161 5. A. 30 B. 35 C. 32 R1 D. 33
  119. 119. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-4) Estimate 171 3. A. 63 R2 B. 70 C. 56 R2 D. 60
  120. 120. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-4) Estimate 2,732 4. A. 600 B. 700 C. 693 D. 690 R3
  121. 121. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-4) Estimate 5,543 9. A. 615 R8 B. 700 C. 600 D. 611 R1
  122. 122. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-5) Divide 75 6. Use estimation to check. A. 13 R2 B. 12 R3 C. 10 R5 D. 16 R4
  123. 123. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-5) Divide 82 7. Use estimation to check. A. 14 R2 B. 11 R3 C. 10 R2 D. 11 R5
  124. 124. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-5) Divide 168 5. Use estimation to check. A. 40 B. 31 R3 C. 33 R3 D. 34
  125. 125. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-5) Divide 739 9. Use estimation to check. A. 82 R2 B. 82 R1 C. 81 D. 77 R7
  126. 126. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-6) Choose the best strategy, then solve the problem. What is the fifteenth number in the pattern: 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, …? Identify the pattern. A. 110; Add 7 B. 40, 960; Multiply by 2 C. 120; Add 8 D. 130; Add 9
  127. 127. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-7) Divide 678 6. Check your answer. A. 113 R2 B. 116 R4 C. 113 D. 111 R2
  128. 128. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-7) Divide 457 4. Check your answer. A. 125 B. 114 R1 C. 115 D. 111 R3
  129. 129. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-7) Divide 889 5. Check your answer. A. 171 R4 B. 178 C. 180 D. 177 R4
  130. 130. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-7) Divide 956 7. Check your answer. A. 136 R4 B. 142 R6 C. 137 D. 137 R4
  131. 131. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-8) Divide 525 5. A. 150 B. 105 C. 15 D. 104
  132. 132. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-8) Divide 621 3. A. 208 B. 27 C. 207 D. 270
  133. 133. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-8) Divide 967 9. A. 107 R4 B. 17 R4 C. 107 D. 170 R4
  134. 134. Divide by a One-Digit Number 9 (over Lesson 9-8) Divide 635 6. A. 15 R5 B. 150 C. 150 R5 D. 105 R5
  135. 135. This slide is intentionally blank.

×