Math Gr4 Ch7

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Math Gr4 Ch7

  1. 1. Chapter 7 Multiply by One-Digit Numbers Click the mouse or press the space bar to continue.
  2. 2. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 Lesson 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Lesson 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Lesson 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products Lesson 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers Lesson 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Lesson 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Lesson 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros
  3. 3. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Five-Minute Check (over Chapter 6) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2 Example 3
  4. 4. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 • I will multiply multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 using basic facts and patterns.
  5. 5. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Preparation for Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi- digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  6. 6. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 A leopard shark gives birth to 8 pups in 1 litter. How many pups would be in 300 litters of that size? You need to find 8 300. Use basic facts and patterns. 8 × 3 = 24 8 × 3 ones = 24 ones = 24 8 × 30 = 240 8 × 3 tens = 24 tens = 240 8 × 300 = 2,400 8 × 3 hundreds = 24 hundreds = 2,400 Answer: So, 300 litters of 8 would be 2,400 puppies. Notice that this answer is 8 3 with two zeros at the end.
  7. 7. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Teresa’s car payments are $200 a month. How much will she have paid after 8 months? A. $16 B. $160 C. $1,600 D. $16,000
  8. 8. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Find 8 × 7,000. 8 × 7 = 56 8 × 7 ones = 56 ones = 56 8 × 70 = 560 8 × 7 tens = 56 tens = 560 8 × 700 = 5,600 8 × 7 hundreds = 56 hundreds = 5,600 8 × 7,000 = 56,000 8 × 7 thousands = 56 thousands = 56,000 Answer: So, 8 7,000 is 56,000. Notice that this answer is 8 7 with three zeros at the end.
  9. 9. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Find 4 × 9,000. A. 36 B. 360 C. 3,600 D. 36,000
  10. 10. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 Orca whales live in pods and can weigh up to 8,000 pounds. What is the total weight of a pod of 6 orca whales? To find the total weight of the pod, you need to find 6 8,000.
  11. 11. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 6 8,000 48,000 Answer: So, the weight of the orca whale is 48,000 pounds.
  12. 12. 7-1 Multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000 A female adult elephant weighs about 4,000 kg. About how much would 5 adult female elephants weigh all together? A. 200,000 kg B. 20,000 kg C. 2,000 kg D. 200 kg
  13. 13. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 7-1) Main Idea California Standards Example 1: Problem-Solving Skill
  14. 14. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers • I will decide whether an answer to a problem is reasonable.
  15. 15. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Standard 4MR3.1 Evaluate the reasonableness of the solution in the context of the original situation.
  16. 16. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Preparation for Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi- digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  17. 17. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Odell donated 3 cases of dog treats to a dog shelter. Each case has 900 treats. The dogs eat 2,500 treats each month. Odell says he has donated enough treats for more than one month. Is his claim reasonable?
  18. 18. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Understand What facts do you know? • 3 cases of dog treats were donated. • Each case has 900 treats. • The animals eat 2,500 treats each month. What do you need to find? • Is it reasonable to say that the 3 cases of treats will last longer than one month?
  19. 19. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Plan Find 3 × 900. Then compare to find if the amount is reasonable.
  20. 20. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Solve 3 × 900 2,700 Answer: Since 2,700 > 2,500, it is reasonable to say that the three cases will last longer than one month.
  21. 21. 7-2 Problem-Solving Skill: Reasonable Answers Check You can add to see if the answer is correct. 900 + 900 + 900 = 2,700 3 × 900 = 2,700 So, the answer is correct.
  22. 22. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 7-2) Main Idea and Vocabulary California Standards Example 1 Example 2 Example 3
  23. 23. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products • I will estimate products by rounding. • estimate
  24. 24. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products Standard 4NS3.1 Round whole numbers through the millions to the nearest ten, hundred, thousand, ten thousand, or hundred thousand.
  25. 25. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products The distance from Sydney, Australia, southwest to Wagga Wagga, Australia is 470 km. About how many kilometers will be traveled in a round trip? Estimate 2 × 470. Round the larger factor to its greatest place. Then use basic facts and patterns to multiply.
  26. 26. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products 2 × 470 2 × 500 Answer: So, about 1,000 km will be traveled in a round trip to Wagga Wagga, Australia. Since 470 was rounded up, the estimated product is greater than the actual product.
  27. 27. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products The distance from Terrine’s house to her aunt’s house is 384 miles. She plans on driving back and forth to her house to visit once in the spring and then again in the summer. About how many miles total will she drive in those two round trips? A. 1,600 B. 160 C. 16 D. 16,000
  28. 28. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products Estimate 8 × 3,252. 8 × 3,252 8 × 3,000 Answer: So, 8 3,252 is about 24,000. Since 3,252 was rounded down, the estimated product is less than the actual product.
  29. 29. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products Estimate 7 × 4,356. A. 32,000 B. 3,200 C. 28,000 D. 2,800
  30. 30. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products A trip to the Grand Canyon will cost $2,804 per person. About how much will it cost for a group of 5 friends to travel there? You need to estimate 5 × $2,804. First round, then multiply. 5 × $2,804 5 × $3,000 = $15,000 Answer: So, the trip for all 5 friends will cost about $15,000.
  31. 31. 7-3 Use Rounding to Estimate Products If the Blackwell family saved $2,147 a year for 6 years, about how much money would they have saved up after those 6 years? A. $1,200 B. $12,000 C. $1,800 D. $18,000
  32. 32. 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 7-3) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers
  33. 33. 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers • I will multiply a two-digit number by a one-digit number.
  34. 34. 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers Preparation for Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  35. 35. 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers Standard 4MR2.1 Use estimation to verify the reasonableness of the solution in the context of the original situation.
  36. 36. 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers Find 3 × 56. Estimate 3 × 56 3 × 60 = 180 One Way: Distributive Property 3 × 56 = (3 × 50) + (3 × 6) = 150 + 18 = 168
  37. 37. 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers Another Way: Partial Products 56 50 6 × 3 150 3 150 18 + 18 168 150 + 18 = 168
  38. 38. 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers Another Way: Paper and Pencil Step 1 Multiply the ones. Step 2 Multiply the tens. 1 1 56 6 × 3 = 18 56 × 3 Regroup 18 ones as × 3 8 1 ten and 8 ones. 168 Check for Reasonableness The product, 168, is close to the estimate, 180.
  39. 39. 7-4 Multiply Two-Digit Numbers Find 7 × 32. A. 204 B. 214 C. 732 D. 224
  40. 40. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 7-4) Main Idea California Standards Example 1: Problem-Solving Investigation
  41. 41. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy • I will choose the best strategy to solve a problem.
  42. 42. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Standard 4MR1.1 Analyze problems by identifying relationships, distinguishing relevant from irrelevant information, sequencing and prioritizing information, and observing patterns.
  43. 43. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Preparation for Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  44. 44. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy ISABEL: I am making punch for a party. One bowl of punch serves 35 guests. I am going to make four bowls of punch. YOUR MISSION: Find how many guests will be served by four bowls.
  45. 45. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Understand What facts do you know? • One bowl of punch serves 35 guests. • Isabel is making four bowls of punch. What do you need to find? • Find how many guests will be served by four bowls of punch.
  46. 46. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Plan Use the four-step plan and write a number sentence. Multiply the number of guests served by one bowl of punch by the number of bowls being made. Use the four-step plan.
  47. 47. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Solve You need to find 35 × 4. Multiply 4 × 30. Multiply 4 × 5. Add. 120 + 20 = 140 Answer: So, four bowls of punch will serve 140 guests.
  48. 48. 7-5 Problem-Solving Investigation: Choose a Strategy Check Look back at the problem. You can use repeated addition to check your answer. 35 + 35 + 35 + 35 = 140 So, the answer is correct.
  49. 49. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 7-5) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2
  50. 50. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers • I will multiply a three-digit number by a one-digit number.
  51. 51. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Preparation for Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  52. 52. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Standard 4MR2.1 Use estimation to verify the reasonableness of calculated results.
  53. 53. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Aisha’s teacher bought 5 bags of rubber bands. If each bag has 185 bands in it, how many bands did she buy? Estimate 5 × 185 5 × 200 = 1,000 185 × 5 500 Multiply 5 × 100. 400 Multiply 5 × 80. + 25 Multiply 5 × 5. 925 Add the partial products.
  54. 54. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers 100 + 80 + 5 500 400 5 500 400 25 + 25 925 Answer: So, Aisha’s teacher bought 925 rubber bands. Check for Reasonableness The product, 925, is close to the estimate 1,000.
  55. 55. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Meredith bought 3 containers of paper clips containing 225 in each container. How many paper clips did she buy altogether? A. 675 B. 700 C. 450 D. 625
  56. 56. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Find 2 × $4,387. Step 1 Multiply the ones. 1 $4,387 2 × 7 = 14 × 2 Regroup 14 as 1 ten and 4 ones. 4
  57. 57. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Step 2 Multiply the tens. 11 2 × 8 = 16 tens $4,387 Add the regrouped tens. × 2 16 tens + 1 ten = 17 tens 74 Regroup 17 as 1 hundred and 7 tens. Step 3 Multiply the hundreds. 11 2 × 3 = 6 hundreds $4,387 Add the regrouped hundreds. × 2 6 hundreds + 1 hundred = 7 hundreds 774
  58. 58. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Step 4 Multiply the thousands. 11 $4,387 × 2 $8,774 2 × 4 thousands = 8 thousands
  59. 59. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers The area model shows that 2 × $4,387 = $8,774. $4,000 + $300 + $80 + $7 2 $8,000 $600 $160 $14 $8,000 $ 600 $ 160 + $ 14 $8,774
  60. 60. 7-6 Multiply Multi-Digit Numbers Find 3 × $2,145. A. $6,325 B. $6,435 C. $7,000 D. $7,435
  61. 61. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Five-Minute Check (over Lesson 7-6) Main Idea California Standards Example 1 Example 2
  62. 62. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros • I will multiply multi-digit numbers with zeros by a one-digit number.
  63. 63. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Preparation for Standard 4NS3.2 Demonstrate an understanding of, and the ability to use, standard algorithms for multiplying a multi-digit number by a two-digit number and for dividing a multi-digit number by a one-digit number; use relationships between them to simplify computations and to check results.
  64. 64. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Standard 4MR2.1 Use estimation to verify the reasonableness of calculated results.
  65. 65. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros The lease payment for the school’s video equipment is $704 a month. How much can the school expect to pay for the first 5 months of school? Multiply the cost of each month by 5. That is, find 5 × $704. Estimate 5 × $704 5 × $700 = $3,500
  66. 66. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros The area model shows 5 × $704.
  67. 67. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros One Way: Distributive Property 5 × $704 = (5 × $700) + (5 × $0) + (5 × $4) = $3,500 + $0 + $20 = $3,520
  68. 68. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Another Way: Partial Products $704 × 5 $3,500 Multiply 5 × $700. $ 0 Multiply 5 × $0. + $ 20 Multiply 5 × $4. $3,520 Add the partial products. Answer: So, the lease payment after 5 months is $3,520.
  69. 69. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Check for Reasonableness The answer, $3,520, is close to the estimate $3,500.
  70. 70. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Julie’s rent is $403 a month. If she wants to pay 4 months all at once, how much does she have to pay? A. $1,600 B. $1,700 C. $1,602 D. $1,612
  71. 71. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros A record-breaking pumpkin weighed 1,061 pounds. What would the total weight of 4 of these pumpkins be? Estimate 4 × $1,061 4 × $1,000 = $4,000 Step 1 Multiply the ones. 1,061 × 4 4× 1 = 4 4
  72. 72. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Step 2 Multiply the tens. 2 1,061 4 × 6 = 24 × 4 Regroup 24 as 2 hundreds and 4 tens. 44 Step 3 Multiply the hundreds. 2 1,061 4 × 0 hundreds = 0 hundreds × 4 Add the regrouped hundreds. 2 44 0 hundreds + 2 hundreds = 2 hundreds
  73. 73. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Step 4 Multiply the thousands. 2 1,061 × 4 4 × 1 thousand = 4 thousands 4,2 44 Answer: So, the total weight of the pumpkins would be 4,244 pounds. Check for Reasonableness The answer, 4,244 is close to the estimate, 4,000. So the answer is reasonable.
  74. 74. 7-7 Multiply Across Zeros Find 6 3,189. A. 18,134 B. 18,684 C. 19,684 D. 19,134
  75. 75. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 Five-Minute Checks Multiply Two-Digit Numbers
  76. 76. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 Lesson 7-1 (over Chapter 6) Lesson 7-2 (over Lesson 7-1) Lesson 7-3 (over Lesson 7-2) Lesson 7-4 (over Lesson 7-3) Lesson 7-5 (over Lesson 7-4) Lesson 7-6 (over Lesson 7-5) Lesson 7-7 (over Lesson 7-6)
  77. 77. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Chapter 6) Tell whether the equation is balanced. 1 dime 3 = (1 dime + 1 nickel) 3 A. Yes; 30¢ = 30¢ B. No; 30¢ ≠ 45¢ C. Yes; 30¢ = 45¢ A. A B. B D. No; 30¢ = 45¢ C. C D. D
  78. 78. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Chapter 6) Tell whether the equation is balanced. 2 6 3 = 16 4 A. Yes; 3 = 4 B. No; 4 ≠ 4 C. Yes; 4 = 4 D. No; 4 = 4
  79. 79. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Chapter 6) Tell whether the equation is balanced. (8 5) 4=2 ( ___ – 3) A. 8 B. 5 C. 10 D. 7
  80. 80. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-1) Multiply. 5 7; 5 70; 5 700 A. 30; 350; 3,500 B. 35; 305; 3,000 C. 35; 355; 3,555 A. A B. B D. 35; 350; 3,500 C. C D. D
  81. 81. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-1) Multiply. 9 2; 9 20; 9 200 A. 18; 189; 1,899 B. 18; 180; 1,800 C. 11; 110; 1,100 D. 18; 108; 1,800
  82. 82. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-1) Multiply. Use mental math. 3 9,000 A. 12,333 B. 9,003 C. 27,000 D. 27,333
  83. 83. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-1) Multiply. Use mental math. 2 500 A. 1,000 B. 722 C. 1,022 D. 700
  84. 84. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-2) Decide whether the answer is reasonable. Explain your reasoning. Kyle delivers 50 papers a day in his neighborhood. Is it reasonable to expect that he will deliver 320 by the end of 1 week? A. No, 7 days in one week 50 papers in one day is 350 papers. He will not deliver 320. B. Yes, 7 days in one week 50 papers in one A A. day is 320 papers. He will deliver 320. B. B C. C D. D
  85. 85. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-2) Decide whether the answer is reasonable. Explain your reasoning. Kyle delivers 50 papers a day in his neighborhood. Is it reasonable to expect that he will deliver 320 by the end of 1 week? C. No, 5 days in one week 50 papers in one day is 250 papers. He will not deliver 320. D. Yes, 7 days in one week 50 papers in A. A one day is 350 papers. He will deliver at least 320. B B. C. C D. D
  86. 86. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-2) Decide whether the answer is reasonable. Explain your reasoning. Kyle delivers 50 papers a day in his neighborhood. Is it reasonable to expect that he will deliver 320 by the end of 1 week? D. Yes, 7 days in one week 50 papers in one day is 350 papers. He will deliver at least 320. A. A B. B C. C D. D
  87. 87. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-3) Estimate the product. 3 439 A. 1,000 B. 1,200 C. 1,317 A. A B. B D. 1,500 C. C D. D
  88. 88. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-3) Estimate the product. 6 912 A. 4,500 B. 5,472 C. 6,000 D. 5,400
  89. 89. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-3) Estimate the product. 7 291 A. 2,100 B. 2,037 C. 1,400 D. 2,000
  90. 90. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-3) Estimate the product. 4 68 A. 272 B. 240 C. 270 D. 280
  91. 91. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-4) Multiply. 2 44 A. 82 B. 46 C. 88 A. A B. B D. 98 C. C D. D
  92. 92. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-4) Multiply. 4 39 A. 126 B. 156 C. 43 D. 160
  93. 93. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-4) Multiply. 3 $21 A. $54 B. $24 C. $61 D. $63
  94. 94. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-4) Multiply. 5 89 A. 445 B. 405 C. 144 D. 440
  95. 95. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-5) Use any strategy to solve. Adriana went to an amusement park on a camp trip during summer vacation. She spent $24 on an admission ticket, $3 on a drink, and bought 4 souvenir postcards for $1 each. If she had $12 left, how much money did she start with? A. $40 C. $43 A. A B. $19 D. $33 B. B C. C D. D
  96. 96. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-6) Multiply. Check for reasonableness. 2 596 A. 818 B. 1,082 C. 718 A. A B. B D. 1,192 C. C D. D
  97. 97. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-6) Multiply. Check for reasonableness. 4 623 A. 1,067 B. 2,492 C. 627 D. 2,482
  98. 98. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-6) Multiply. Check for reasonableness. 3 5,188 A. 15,564 B. 8,311 C. 15,344 D. 8,421
  99. 99. Multiply by One-Digit Numbers 7 (over Lesson 7-6) Multiply. Check for reasonableness. 5 1,923 A. 9,505 B. 7,478 C. 9,615 D. 5,505
  100. 100. This slide is intentionally blank.

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