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Understand standards in Smart cities

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Slide pack covered the standardization applicable by various agencies i.e. ISO, BIS, BSI ,ITU etc..

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Understand standards in Smart cities

  1. 1. Understand Standards in Smart Cities Madhukar Varshney www.RiseOfMachine.com
  2. 2. Agenda  Smart City Definition  Smart Cities in India  Smart City Standardization  Overview of ISO 37120  ITU Standards  BSI Standards (British)  BIS Standards ( India)  Summary and Conclusion
  3. 3. Smart Cities  “Smart Cities” : means many things for many people, (depending on what aspect of the city we are touching upon).  The one thing that remains constant is that “being smart” to a large extent is associated with  having access to better-informed decisions and  actions that will enable cities and people to do things differently and tackle urban growth challenges.  Means relying on what information and communication technology (ICT) can offer.
  4. 4. Smart Cities Definition..  In year 2007, Prof Rudolf Giffinger of Vienna University of Technology formally coined the term “Smart City”  Smart City uses technology and ICT to better quality & performance to engage more effectively and actively with its citizens.  The Smart City includes government services, transport, traffic management, energy, health care, water and waste.  The UK Department of Business, Innovation and Skills considers smart cities a process rather than as a static outcome, in which increased citizen engagement, hard infrastructure, social capital and digital technologies make cities more livable, resilient and better able to respond to challenges.  The British Standards Institute defines it as “the effective integration of physical, digital and human systems in the built environment to deliver sustainable, prosperous and inclusive future of its citizens”. Source : http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/comment/smart-cities-require-smartplanning/43739.html
  5. 5. Smart City Definition  CISCO defines smart cities as those who adopt scalable solutions that take advantage of information and communications technology (ICT) to increase efficiencies, reduce costs and enhance the quality of life”.  Wikipedia defines a city as Smart when investments in human and social capital and traditional (Transport) and modern (ICT) communications infrastructure fuel sustainable economic development and a high quality of life, with a wise management of natural resources, through participatory action and engagement (Caragliu et al, 2009)  Frost & Sullivan defines as “Smart cities are an evolved state of urbanization where application of technology integrates diverse individual entities such as buildings, utilities, authorities, infrastructure and industries.” In short, a smart city is one that uses information technology to solve urban problems
  6. 6. Smart Cities Definition
  7. 7. Smart City Components
  8. 8. Smart Cities in India
  9. 9. Smart Cities in India
  10. 10. Factors driving rise of Smart Cities in India
  11. 11. Need of Standardization Benchmarking Build a Unified Understanding Citizen Benefit Management Protect Investment Cost Optimization Seamless Interconnection Cooperation & Collaboration
  12. 12. Benefits of using the Standards in Smart Cities  More effective governance and delivery of services  International benchmarks and targets  Local benchmarking and planning  Informed decision making for policy makers and city managers  Learning across cities  Leverage for funding and recognition in international entities  Leverage for funding by cities with senior levels of government  Framework for sustainability planning  Transparency and open data for investment attractiveness  Comparable data for city decision making, insight and global benchmarking
  13. 13. Standardization efforts in Smart Cities  In the wake of the World Smart City Forum, held on 13 July 2016,Singapore,representative of ISO,IEC,ITU,IEEE,CEN-CENELEC & ETSI gathered for meeting initiated by the IEC.  This meeting was a global first and part of an ongoing dialogue among standard organizations  The aim was to accelerate and better align Smart City Standardization work, which is essential for successful Smart City deployment
  14. 14. Traditional Certification ISO 27000 ,Clause 2.77  ISO 27000 (Information Security Management Systems) (ISMS) Standards  Potential cause of an unwanted incident which may result in harm to a system or an organization But what about the city? The harm is much wider!!
  15. 15. ISO 37210
  16. 16. WCCD (World Council on City Data) http://www.dataforcities.org/wccd/; @wccitydata  Discovering solutions for our rapidly urbanizing planet, the World Council on City Data (WCCD) is the global leader in standardized city data - creating smart, sustainable, resilient, and prosperous cities.  As a global leader on standardized metrics, the WCCD is implementing ISO 37120 Sustainable Development of Communities: Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life, the new international standard; created by cities, for cities. The WCCD has developed the first ISO 37120 certification system and the Global Cities Registry™.
  17. 17. ISO 37120  ISO 37120:2014 can be used by any city, municipality or local government wishing to measure its performance in a comparable and verifiable manner, irrespective of size and location or level of development.  ISO 37120:2014 is the first ISO standard for city indicators. It is being developed as part of an integrated suite of standards for sustainable development in communities.  Scope of ISO/TC 268 - Sustainable development in communities include requirements, guidance and supporting techniques and tools to help all kind of communities, their related subdivisions and interested and concerned parties become more resilient and sustainable and demonstrate achievements in that regard.  The proposed series of International Standards will thus encourage the development and implementation of holistic, cross-sector and area- based approaches to sustainable development in communities. It will include Management System Requirements, Guidance and Related standards.
  18. 18. ISO 37210  Titled as “Sustainable development of communities -- Indicators for city services and quality of life”  It presents a set of (around 100) indicators to measure the performance of city services and quality of life.  The standard is applicable to any city, municipality or local government that wants to measure its performance, in a comparable and verifiable manner, irrespective of size and location.  The standard is available at the ISO web site (at a price).  A free summary can be obtained here (ISO preview facility). A good start for measuring smart city initiatives. Need real time assessment of ICT infrastructure.
  19. 19. Smart City Indicators
  20. 20. ISO 37210 Indicators
  21. 21. ISO 37210 Indicators
  22. 22. ISO 37210 Indicators
  23. 23. ISO 37210 Indicators
  24. 24. WCD Certification Levels WCCD certification levels are based on the number of indicators reported by the city. The WCCD offers a wide range of certification levels. ASPIRATIONAL BRONZE SILVER GOLD PLATINUM 30-45 Core Indicators 46-59 Indicators 46 Core + 0-13 Supporting 60-75 Indicators 46 Core + 14-29 Supporting 76-90 Indicators 46 Core + 30-44 Supporting 91-100 Indicators 46 Core + 45-54 Supporting
  25. 25. The ITU Technical Spec on Smart Sustainable Cities  The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Focus Group on Smart Sustainable Cities (FG-SSC) published the technical specification “Key performance indicators related to the sustainability impacts of information and communication technology in smart sustainable cities”, on March 2015  The work on SSC is being continued by the new ITU-T Study Group 20 on “Internet of things (IoT) and smart cities and communities (SC&C)”, which provides a unique platform to influence the development of international IoT standards and their application as part of urban-development master plans.  The technical specification is much like the ISO 37120 ,adopting some of its provisions on suggested metrics. ITU specification is generally “narrower” than ISO, going deeper in some ICT issues.  The specification is available free of charge, here (doc format, at the ITU website).  My view: a valuable resource, open and reusable, able to shed some light in the ICT-related issues of a smart city. Of course, measurement indicators are the target / not a cookbook of practices.
  26. 26. ITU Activities on IoT & Smart Sustainable Cities
  27. 27. ITU – SSC (Smart Cities & Communities)  ITU-T Study Group 20 (SG20) is responsible for the development of international standards to enable the coordinated development of IoT technologies in smart cities, including machine-to-machine communications and ubiquitous sensor networks. This Study Group is also involved in studies relating to big data aspects of IoT and smart cities and communities.
  28. 28. Towards IOT Enabled Smart Cities
  29. 29. Dubai Smart City Dimensions (Smart Dubai, 2016) Dubai the first city in the world to have analysed the smartness and sustainability of its urban services taking the ITU standardized KPI’s.
  30. 30. Dubai Smart City KPI’s http://smartdubai.ae/story_five.php
  31. 31. UFSSC (United for Smart Sustainable Cities) – new UN Initiative ITU and UNECE launched "United for Smart Sustainable Cities" (U4SSC) in response to the Sustainable Development Goal 11: "Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable". U4SSC is now an UN initiative supported by CBD, ECLAC, FAO, ITU, UNDP, UNECA, UNECE, UNESCO, UN Environment, UNEP-FI, UNFCCC, UN-Habitat, UNIDO, UNU-EGOV, UN-Women and WMO. U4SSC advocates for public policy to encourage the use of ICTs to facilitate and ease the transition to smart sustainable cities. U4SSC serves as the global platform for discussions on smart sustainable cities. The Sustainable Development Goals 11, otherwise known as the Global Goals, build on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Adopted on 1 January 2016, these universally applicable 17 goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, seek to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities, tackle climate change and address a range of social needs like education, health, social protection and job opportunities over the next 15 years
  32. 32. Sustainable Development Goals •Flipbook on "Connecting cities and communities with the SDGs" •Flipbook on "Enhancing innovation and participation in smart sustainable cities" •Flipbook on "Implementing SDG11 by connecting sustainability policies and urban planning practices through ICTs"
  33. 33. ITU-T FG-DPM New Focus Group on Data Processing and Management to support IoT and Smart Cities & Communities  Objectives: FG – DPM will promote the establishment of data management frameworks and will also:  study trust in data management frameworks including digital identification and certification;  investigate the role of technologies to support data management and emerging trends including blockchain;  identify challenges in the standardization activities for data processing and management.  Deliverables to ITU-T SG20:  Guide containing the required definitions of terminologies and taxonomy for data processing and management.  Draft Technical Reports/Specifications to address DPM standardization gaps
  34. 34. The ITU Technical Report on Smart Sustainable Cities  The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Focus Group on Smart Sustainable Cities (FG-SCC) published the technical report “An overview of smart sustainable cities and the role of information and communication technologies”, in 2014  The 40-pages long technical report is a well-structured description of the smart city concept, trying to describe the intervention areas and some relevant ICT enablers.  The technical report is available free of charge, here (doc format, at the ITU website).  My view: a rather comprehensive but introductory resource. Valuable as a training material / guide, will not enlighten the expert. Although it contains some example technologies, it fails short from an all-inclusive map of smart cities technologies.
  35. 35. BSI Smart City Standards Work The UK Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) has commissioned BSI (The British Standards Institute) to develop a standards strategy for smart cities in the UK. The strategy identifies the role of standards in accelerating the implementation of smart cities and providing assurance to citizens that the risks are being managed appropriately. Following the various modules :
  36. 36. BSI PAS 181  The British Standards Institute (BSI) has published the PAS 181 “Smart city framework – Guide to establishing strategies for smart cities and communities” as a practical guide for smart city development, in 2014  The document contains a 12-areas map for smart cities (e.g. energy, water, waste, etc) and a comprehensive action framework for planning and managing smart city interventions.  The document is available for free download here, or as paperback at a price.  My view: one of the best all-around documents for smart city design and development. I definitely use the actions framework in my lectures towards municipality staff. Yet, not an all-inclusive list of interventions with a model on how to choose, but still one of the best quality material out there.
  37. 37. BSI PAS 182  The BSI PAS 182 “Smart city concept model. Guide to establishing a model for data interoperability” is aimed to be a practical guide for tackling the data-related challenges of Smart Cities, published in 2014  The document describes a preliminary data model, to describe several aspects of smart cities, including indicators, actors, infrastructure and other information elements.  actors, contains a 12-areas map for smart cities (e.g. energy, water, waste, etc) and a comprehensive action framework for planning and managing smart city interventions.  The document is available for free download here, or as paperback at a price.  My view: although can be of some use, as an indicative catalogue of data elements for (smart) cities, it fails very short from the target of “achieving interoperability”. For that, much more are needed at the ontological and semantic level (e.g. controlled vocabularies, extended metadata schemas, core components, etc) that can however be adopted by standardization documents like the National Interoperability Frameworks.
  38. 38. BSI PAS 183  This PAS gives guidance on establishing a decision-making framework for sharing data and information services in smart cities.  It covers:  types of data in smart cities;  establishing a data sharing culture;  data value chain – roles and responsibilities;  purposes for data use;  assessing data states;  defining access rights for data; and  data formats/format of transportation.  The document is available for free download here, or as paperback at a price.
  39. 39. BSI PAS 181 View of Traditional City
  40. 40. BSI PAS 181 vision of new integrated operating model
  41. 41. BSI PAS 181 SCF (Smart City Framework)
  42. 42. Other standards Other relevant standardization attempts for Smart Cities are the following documents, from BIS and ISO:  BIS Smart city terminology (PAS 180)  BIS Smart city overview document (PD 8100)  BIS Smart city planning guidelines document (PD 8101)  Research on smart infrastructure projects (PD ISO/TR 37150)  A specification for KPIs for smart infrastructure projects (PD ISO/TS 37151)
  43. 43. London Dashboard https://www.opendatasoft.com/2016/10/05/smart-city-dashboards/
  44. 44. Standardization Agencies in other countries India : BIS (Bureau of Indian Standards) SIS- Swedish Standards Institute KATS - Korean Agency for Technology and Standards
  45. 45. Smart Cities standards in India  National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM) partnered with Accenture to prepare a report called ‘ Integrated ICT and Geospatial Technologies Framework for 100 Smart Cities Mission’ to explore the role of ICT in developing smart cities, after the announcement of the Mission by Indian Government.  The report, released in May 2015, lists down 55 global standards, keeping in view several city sub -systems like urban planning, transport, governance, energy, climate and pollution management, etc which could be applicable to the smart cities in India.  Though NASSCOM is working closely with the Ministry of Urban Development to create a sustainable model for smart cities , due to lack of regulatory standards for smart cities, the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) in India has undertaken the task to formulate standardised guidelines for central and state authorities in planning, design and construction of smart cities by setting up a technical committee under the Civil engineering department of the Bureau.
  46. 46. Smart Cities –Indicators (ISC 3.020.20 ) (17 Sectors)  The Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) has constituted the Smart Cities Sectional Committee, CED 59 for development of Indian Standards related to Smart cities with the following scope –  As a part of the above ambitious project of formulation of standards on Smart Cities taken up by BIS, the following draft standard is hereby issued in wide circulation for eliciting public comments  First issued as a Preliminary draft (P Draft) on 01 Feb 2016, modified/updated and issued as a modified P draft on 30 Sept 2016 ;  Last Date for comments: 29 Nov 2016  While preparing this Indian Standard, necessary guidance has been derived from 'ISO 37120:2014 Sustainable Development of Communities: Indicators for city services and quality of life', duly modulated by the standards notified by various statutory and other authorized agencies in India.  The Core Indicators described in this Indian Standard are considered essential for steering and assessing the performance management of city services and quality of life.  The Core and Supporting Indicators are classified into themes according to the different sectors and services provided by a city.  BIS document is available here(FREE Of cost)
  47. 47. BIS Smart Cities Indicators (1/6) Sector Core Indicator Supporting indicator ECONOMY 4.1. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the City (Core Indicator) 4.3. Gini’s coefficient (Supporting Indicator) 4.2. GDP Per capita (Core Indicator) 4.6. Number of Businesses per 100 000 Population (Supporting Indicator) 4.4. City’s Unemployment Rate (Core Indicator) 4.5. Assessed Value of Commercial and Industrial Properties as a Percentage of Total Assessed Value of all Properties (Core Indicator) EDUCATION 5.1. Percentage of Female School-aged Population Enrolled in Schools (Core Indicator) 5.5. Percentage of School-aged Population Enrolled in Schools (Supporting Indicator) 5.2. Percentage of Students Completing Primary Education: Survival Rate (Core Indicator) 5.3. Percentage of Students Completing Secondary Education: Survival Rate (Core Indicator) 5.4. Primary Education Student/Teacher Ratio (Core Indicator) ENERGY 6.1. The Percentage of Total Energy Derived from Renewable Sources, as a Share of the City’s Total Energy Consumption (Core Indicator) 6.3. Total Electrical Energy Use per Capita (kWh/year) (Supporting Indicator) 6.2. Total Residential Electrical Energy use per Capita (kWh/year) (Core Indicator) 6.4. Average Number of Electrical Interruptions per Customer per Year (Supporting Indicator) 6.5. Average Length of Electrical Interruptions (in Hours) (Supporting Indicator)
  48. 48. BIS Smart Cities Indicators (2/6) Sector Core Indicator Supporting indicator ENVIRONMENT 7.1. Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Concentration (Core Indicator) 7.3. NO2 (Nitrogen Dioxide) Concentration (Supporting Indicator) 7.2. Particulate Matter (PM10) Concentration (Core Indicator) 7.4. SO2 (Sulphur Dioxide) Concentration (Supporting Indicator) 7.6. Green House Gas Emissions Measured in Tones per Capita (Core Indicator) 7.5 O3 (Ozone) Concentration (Supporting Indicator) 7.7. Air Quality Index (Core Indicator) 7.8. Noise Pollution (Core Indicator) 7.9. Quality of Public Water Bodies (Core Indicator) FINANCE 8.1. Debt Service Ratio (Debt Service Expenditure as a Percentage of Municipality’s Own-Source Revenue) (Core Indicator) 8.2. Capital Spending as a Percentage of Total Expenditures (Supporting Indicator) 8.3. Own-Source Revenue as a Percentage of Total Revenues (Supporting Indicator) 8.4. Tax Collected as a Percentage of Tax Billed (Supporting Indicator) FIRE AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE 9.1. Number of Professional Fire Fighters per 100 000 Population (Core Indicator) 9.2. Number of Volunteer and Part-time Firefighters per 100 000 Population (Supporting Indicator) 9.3. Number of Fire Related Deaths per 100 000 Population (Core Indicator) 9.5. Response Time for Emergency Response Services from Initial Call (Supporting Indicator) 9.4. Number of Natural Disaster Related Deaths per 100 000 Population (Core Indicator) 9.6. Response time for Fire Department from initial call (Supporting Indicator)
  49. 49. BIS Smart Cities Indicators (3/6) Sector Core Indicator Supporting indicator GOVERNANCE 10.1. Voter Participation in Last Municipal Election (as a Percentage of Eligible Voters) (Core Indicator) 10.3. Percentage of Women Employed in the City Government Workforce (Supporting Indicator) 10.2. Women as a Percentage of Total Elected to City-Level Offices (Core Indicator) 10.4. Number of Convictions for Corruption by City Officials per 100000 Population (Supporting Indicator) 10.1. Voter Participation in Last Municipal Election (as a Percentage of Eligible Voters) (Core Indicator) 10.3. Percentage of Women Employed in the City Government Workforce (Supporting Indicator) 10.2. Women as a Percentage of Total Elected to City-Level Offices (Core Indicator) 10.4. Number of Convictions for Corruption by City Officials per 100000 Population (Supporting Indicator) 10.5. Citizens’ Representation: Number of local official elected to office per 100000 Population (Supporting Indicator) 10.6. Number of Registered Voters as a Percentage of the Voting Age Population (Supporting Indicator) HEALTH 11.1. Average Life Expectancy at Birth (Core Indicator) 11.5. Number of Mental Health Practitioners per 100000 Population (Supporting Indicator) 11.2. Under Age Five Mortality per 1000 Live Births (Core Indicator) 11.6. Number of Nursing and Midwifery Personnel per 100 000 Population (Supporting Indicator) 11.3. Number of In-Patient Hospital Beds per 100000 Population (Core Indicator) 11.7. Suicide Rate per 100 000 Population (Supporting Indicator) 11.4. Number of Physicians per 100000 Population (Core Indicator) RECREATION 12.1. Square Meters of Public Indoor Recreation Space per Capita (Supporting Indicator) 12.2. Square Meters of Public Outdoor Recreation Space per Capita (Supporting Indicator)
  50. 50. BIS Smart Cities Indicators (4/6) Sector Core Indicator Supporting indicator SAFETY 13.1. Number of Police Personnel per 100000 Population (Core Indicator) 13.4. Response time for police department from initial call (Supporting Indicator) 13.2. Number of Homicides per 100000 Population (Core Indicator) 13.5. Violent crime rate per 100000 population (Supporting Indicator) 13.3. Crimes Against Women per 100000 Population (Core Indicator) SHELTER 14.1. Percentage of city population living in slums (Core Indicator) 14.2. Number of homeless per 100000 population (Supporting Indicator) 14.3. Percentage of households that exist without registered legal titles (Supporting Indicator) SOLID WASTE (Clause 15.1 is missing) 15.2. Total collected municipal solid waste per capita (Core Indicator) 15.4. Percentage of the city’s solid waste that is disposed of in a sanitary landfill (Supporting Indicator) 15.3. Percentage of the city’s solid waste that is recycled (Core Indicator) 15.5. Percentage of the city’s solid waste that is disposed of in an incinerator (Supporting Indicator) 15.6. Percentage of the city’s solid waste that is burned openly (Supporting Indicator) 15.7. Percentage of the city’s solid waste that is disposed off in an open dump (Supporting Indicator) 15.8. Percentage of the city’s solid waste that is disposed of by other means (Supporting Indicator)
  51. 51. BIS Smart Cities Indicators (5/6) Sector Core Indicator Supporting indicator TELE COMMUNICATIO N AND INNOVATION 16.1. Number of internet connections per 100000 population (Core Indicator) 16.3. Percentage of households with internet access (Supporting Indicator) 16.2. Percentage of households with computer (Core Indicator) 16.5. Number of new patents per 100 000 population per year (Supporting Indicator) 16.4. Cyber security readiness for ICT infrastructure and online citizen service delivery (Core Indicator) TRANSPORTATIO N 17.1. Kilometres of high capacity public transport system per 100 000 population (Core Indicator) 17.5. Number of two-wheel motorized vehicles per capita (Supporting Indicator) 17.2. Kilometres of light passenger public transport system per 100 000 population (Core Indicator) 17.6. Kilometres of bicycle paths and lanes per 100 000 population (Supporting Indicator) 17.3. Annual number of public transport trips per capita (Core Indicator) 17.7. Transportation fatalities per 100 000 population (Supporting Indicator) 17.4. Number of personal automobiles per capita (Core Indicator) URBAN PLANNING 18.1. Notified Master Plan for Integrated Land use (Core Indicator) 18.2. Implementation plan for Transit Oriented Development (Supporting Indicator) 18.3. Implementation plan for City Sanitation (Supporting Indicator) 18.4. Green area (hectares) per 100000 population (Supporting Indicator)
  52. 52. BIS Smart Cities Indicators (6/6) Sector Core Indicator Supporting indicator SEWERAGE AND SANITATION 19.1. Percentage of city population having access to sanitary toilet facilities (Core Indicator) 19.5. Percentage of the city’s waste water receiving secondary treatment ( Supporting Indicator) 19.2. Percentage of city population served by sewage (waste water) collection (Core Indicator) 19.6. Percentage of the city’s waste water receiving tertiary treatment ( Supporting Indicator) 19.3. Percentage of the city’s waste water that has received no treatment (Core Indicator) 19.4 Percentage of the city’s waste water receiving primary treatment (Core Indicator) WATER SUPPLY 20.1. Percentage of city population with potable water supply service (Core Indicator) 20.3 Total water consumption per capita (liters/day) (Supporting Indicator) 20.2. Total domestic water consumption per capita (liters/day) (Core Indicator) 20.4. Total water supply through metered water connections (Supporting Indicator) 20.3 Total water consumption per capita (liters/day) (Supporting Indicator) 20.5. Average annual hours of water service interruption per household (Supporting Indicator) 20.4. Total water supply through metered water connections (Supporting Indicator) 20.6. Percentage of water loss (unaccounted for water) (Supporting Indicator) 20.5. Average annual hours of water service interruption per household (Supporting Indicator) 20.6. Percentage of water loss (unaccounted for water) (Supporting Indicator)
  53. 53. Smart Cities in India
  54. 54. Smart City Pune https://carepmc.wordpress.com/2017/01/25/pune-gets-wccd-platinum-certificate/
  55. 55. Smart Cities –Jamshedpur,Surat http://www.amgpatrika.com/jamshedpur-ko-mili-iso-3712-certification/ http://www.imgrum.org/media/1432755900792579588_214455637
  56. 56. E.g.: Smart City Dashboard proposed by CISCO for HYD Source : https://www.slideshare.net/prakash338/smart-cities-global-experiences-and-lessons-for-india- at-asci-hyderabad-25-apr-2013
  57. 57. Benchmarks of Smart Cities (1/4) Sl.No. Parameter Benchmark A Transport • Maximum travel time of 30 minutes in small & medium size cities and 45 minutes in metropolitan areas • Continuous unobstructed footpath of minimum 2m wide on either side of all street with RoW 12m or more • Dedicated and physically segregated bicycle tracks with a width of 2mor more, one in each direction, should be provided on all streets with carriageway larger than 10m (not ROW) • High quality and high frequency mass transport within 800m(10-15 minute walking distance) of all residences in areas over 175persons / ha of built area • Access to para-transit within 300m walking distance. B. Spatial Planning • 175 persons per Ha along transit corridors. • 95% of residences should have daily needs retail, parks, primary schools and recreational areas accessible within 400m walking distance. • 95% residences should have access to employment and public and institutional services by public transport or bicycle or walk • At least 20% of all residential units to be occupied by economically weaker sections in each • Transit Oriented Development Zone 800m from Transit Stations • At least 30% residential and 30% commercial/institutional in every TOD Zone within • 800m of Transit Stations C. Water Supply • 24 x 7 supply of water • 100% household with direct water supply connections • 135 litres of per capita supply of water • 100% metering of water connections • 100% efficiency in collection of water related charges
  58. 58. Benchmarks of Smart Cities (2/4) Sl.No . Parameter Benchmark D. Sewerage &Sanitation • 100% households should have access to toilets • 100% schools should have separate toilets for girls E. Solid Waste Management • 100% households are covered by daily door-step collection system. • 100% collection of municipal solid waste • 100% segregation of waste at source, i.e. bio- degradable and non-degradable waste • 100% recycling of solid waste F. Storm Water Drainage • 100% coverage of road network with storm water drainage network • Aggregate number of incidents of water logging reported in a Year = 0 • 100% rainwater harvesting G. Electricity • 100% households have electricity connection • 24 x 7 supply of electricity • 100% metering of electricity supply • 100% recovery of cost • Tariff slabs that work towards minimizing waste H. Telephone connections • 100% households have a telephone connection including mobile I. Wi-Fi Connectivity • 100% of the city has wi-fi connectivity • 100 Mbps internet speed
  59. 59. Benchmarks of Smart Cities (3/4) Sl.No. Parameter Benchmark J. Health Care Facilities • Availability of telemedicine facilities to 100% residents • 30 minutes emergency response time • 1 dispensary for every 15,000 residents • Nursing home, child, welfare and maternity, centre - 25 to 30 beds per lakh population • Intermediate Hospital (Category B) - 80 beds per lakh population • Intermediate Hospital (Category A) - 200 beds per lakh population • Multi-Speciality Hospital - 200 beds per lakh population • Speciality Hospital - 200 beds per lakh population • General Hospital - 500 beds per lakh population • 10020Family Welfare Centre for every 50,000 residents • 1 Diagnostic centre for every 50,000 residents • 1 Veterinary Hospital for every 5 lakh residents • 1 Dispensary for pet for every 1 lakh residents K. Education 1. Pre Primary to Secondary Education • Area equivalent to 15% of residential area for building hospitals • 1 Pre Primary/ Nursery School for every 2,500 residents • 1 Primary School (class I to V) for every 5,000 residents • 1 Senior Secondary School (Cass VI to XII) for every 7,500 residents • 1 integrated school (Class I to XII) per lakh of population • 1 school for physically challenged for every 45,000 residents • 1 school for mentally challenged for 10 lakh population
  60. 60. Benchmarks of Smart Cities (4/4) Sl.No. Parameter Benchmark 2. Higher Education • 1 college per 1.25 lakh population • 1 university • 1 technical education centre per 10 lakh population • 1 engineering college per 10 lakh population • 1 medical college per 10 lakh population • 1 other professional college per 10 lakh population • 1 paramedical institute per 10 lakh population • 1 veterinary institute L. Fire Fighting • 1 fire station per 2 lakh population / 5-7km radium • 1 sub – fire station with 3-4 km radius M. Others • Use of renewable energy in all sectors • Rooftop solar panels on all public, institutional and commercial buildings as well as multistoried residential housings • Adherence to green building norms • Common ducting for all services • Double entry accounting on real time basis • 3D maps on GIS of property and all services – power, water supply, sewerage etc • Cities to formulate building and parking standards
  61. 61. Summary on Standardization  During the last 18 months, smart cities standardization has done some noticeable steps, providing a handful of documents for several smart city aspects  The metrics aspect appears to be the more progressed in documentation, although ICT indicators and municipality-internal elements do not have the proper attention, yet.  An all-inclusive map of possible interventions is still missing, which is more the work of researchers than standardization bodies.  The ISO, ITU and BSI are most widely accepted and recognized standard setting bodies regarding Smart Cities currently. However, national standard setting organisation of several other countries like Spain, China, Germany, Singapore, etc. are in the process of developing smart cities standards for building safe an d secure smart cities in their respective countries, and have been listed here .
  62. 62. Conclusion  Smart Cities in India have  Addressed the need of global environment and urbanization  Accommodate changing lifestyles of citizens including education & healthcare  Long term approach to develop sustainable urban infrastructure  Need to expedite the deployment, rightnow it is in consulting phase only  The involvement of and interaction with citizens and communities is critical but still evolving. Trust is key in such relationships  Joint efforts by various standardization agencies have resulted in building a uniform understanding of Smart Cities  The metrics approach being adopted in ISO 37120 encourages standardization & benchmarking of Smart Cities

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