In the Face of Architecture: A look at Andalusia

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Abstract:
Structures are often perceived to be static due to their immobility, or assumed to undergo fewer physical changes when compared to mobile objects. My project counters this assumption by demonstrating that architecture is subject to numerous physical changes: modification, elimination, expansion, adaptation, and evolution. Looking at Andalusia, Spain I focused on the city of Granada where I saw the impact of how these changes presented an intricate visible layering of Spain’s history. After my experience studying abroad in Granada, interviewing professors and researching at UGR’s libraries, my instinct was to categorize these seemingly immobile buildings. But through anthropological and art historical methods I found that a structure could not be subject to one particular style of architecture nor one particular function. To confine the structure to a single function or architectural style would deny the structure’s original function and diverse composition of its crucial role in the 21st century. In fact, both architecture and the purpose of a structure transgress two modes of restriction—categorization and classification—in a fluid and figuratively mobile manner. This type of mobility allows for structures to be considered outside of a stationary and inactive standpoint. My three structures chosen from originally twenty examples demonstrate that structures also act as vehicles for visual communication derived from the architectural elements. Important decisions are made behind the scenes about what, how and why changes happen to a building. In turn, these decisions indirectly influence the end result of a structure’s use and architectural organization. In the case of Granada, the structures narrate a timeline from the past to the present as purpose is appropriated and the layers of architectural styles can be seen.

To read more from this paper, email art historian, Madelyne Oliver, at:
madelyne.oliver@yahoo.com

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In the Face of Architecture: A look at Andalusia

  1. 1. UROP Presentation by: UCI Researcher Madelyne OliverIN THE FACE OF ARCHITECTURE: A LOOK AT ANDALUSIA
  2. 2. THESIS: I have chosen three structures of Granada that are diversely composed of Islamic, Mudéjar, Renaissance, and Baroque architectural elements that narrate a timeline, enabling them to move in and out of the past with ease while the structures are reused as 21st century contemporary spaces. This timeline deconstructs the way in which we think of structures as immobile-allowing for narratives to complicate chronology, melt human made classifications, and figuratively move between fatal categories.
  3. 3. THE EVOLUTION OF ARCHITECTURAL STYLES
  4. 4. KEY TERMS TO RECOGNIZE:*See your guide for more terms and their corresponding definitions Alberca Ladrillo Alhondiga Madera Alfiz Mudéjar Arco de Morisco herradura Tratado Armadura Techumbre Capilla Yeseria Cuerda seca Zaguan Gremios Example of Mudejar art: Zoco Laceria Toledo, Iglesia San Roman
  5. 5. VISUALIZING THE TRANSFORMATIONS FROM THE PAST TO THE CONTEMPORARY
  6. 6. IGLESIA DEL SALVADOR
  7. 7. Sevilla, Great Mosque, reconstruction of plan 1172-1182 Sahn/interior central courtInterior courtyard (sahn) ofIglesia del Salvador from its12th-13th centuryAlmohad mosque
  8. 8. Tower of Iglesia del Engraving bySalvador Heylan of Tower Turpina of the Mezquita Mayor (Main mosque) 1055 Facade, Diego de Siloe, 1543-46Tower of SanJuan de losReyes, Granada
  9. 9. Cathedral of Teruel, representations of the Carpenters Tipologies of the churches of GranadaOrdenanzas deGranada
  10. 10. “Armaduras”/truss roof of “Armaduras”/ceilings ofIglesia del Salvador Palacio Dal-al-horra
  11. 11. “Armadura”/truss roof of “Armadura”/trussed the chapel of Iglesia del roof of dome of Salvador Palacio Dal-al-horra
  12. 12. Alhondiga:CORRAL (CASA) DEL CARBÓN
  13. 13. Corral (casa) del Carbon,patio Floor plan of Corral (casa) del Carbon
  14. 14. CASA DE CASTRIL/MUSEO ARQUEOLOGICO
  15. 15. streetMuseo deBellas Artes1920-1946
  16. 16. CONCLUSION
  17. 17. WORKS CITED Gallego Burín, Antonio. Granada: Guía artística e histórica de la ciudad. Granada: Comares, 1996. Gómez-Moreno Calera, José Manuel. “Glosario terminológico esencial” de Arquitectura Mudéjar en la comarca de Guadix. Centro de Iniciativas Turísticas de la Comarca de Guadix, Barcelona, 2009, págs. 191-193 Hinojosa Montalvo, José. Los Mudéjares: La voz del Islam en la España cristiana, Estudio I. Teruel, Centro de Estudios Mudéjares Instituto de Estudios Turolenses, 2002. López-Guzmán, Rafael. Arquitectura Domestica de Granada Moderna. Fundación Albaicín Granada, 2009.  ________. “El Mudéjar de Granada.” Essay unpublished.  ________. “Arte mudéjar-Arte Morisco: Consideraciones Teóricas” Essay unpublished.  ________. Tradición y Clasicismo en La Granada del Siglo XVI: Arquitectura civil y urbanismo. Granada: Diputación 1987. Págs. 333-425 Ramos Lizana, Manuel. Museo Arqueológico y Etnológico de Granada. Guía Oficial. Sevilla: Consejería de Cultura de la Junta de Andalucía, 2005. Villafranca Jiménez, María del Mar. Los museos de Granada. Génesis y evolución histórica (1835-1975). Granada: Diputación, 1998. Photos courtesy of:  Madelyne Oliver (researcher)  Profesor Rafael Lopez Guzman, Universidad de Granada  Antonio Gallego Burin, “Granada: Guia artistica e historica de al ciudad”

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