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ESSENTIALS OF ONLINE
COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT
Maddie Grant, CAE
maddie@socialfish.org
www.socialfish.org
AGENDA
1. PLANNING YOUR COMMUNITY
2. LAUNCH
3. REPORTING
4. CONTENT STRATEGY
5. MANAGING RISK
6. DIGITAL ECOSYSTEM
7. DEFI...
LESSON 1: Planning Your
Private Online Community
PURPOSE
WRONG: WE NEED
• We need to get more
members engaged.
• We need to generate
non-dues revenue.
• We need to draw
me...
Examples of Business Purpose
• Replace an outdated system with a
platform that includes community
functionality.
• Provide...
• Community for member networking
(because members should be posting on
our site instead of LinkedIn.)
• Community to buil...
COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT
STRATEGY
1. Open vs closed
2. Group management
3. Community rules
4. Moderation and staff involvement...
RESOURCE PLANNING
• Administrative
• Monitoring and responding
• Content and engagement
• Managing the platform
• Training...
PROMOTION
Did our new board
member just say
he’s never used the
community?
PROMOTING YOUR COMMUNITY
IS A PROCESS THAT NEVE...
PROMOTION
TWO-PRONGED APPROACH TO ONGOING PROMOTION
MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING
• Membership marketing and
new member onboardi...
Questions?
LESSON 2: Launching Your New
Private Online Community
SOFT LAUNCH - MEMBERS
ARCHETYPES OF USEFUL BETA GROUPS
Archetype Size Activity Privacy Example
Small and
good
10-15 High P...
• Tech-savvy volunteer group leaders.
• Active listserv users who are asking for
updated functionality.
• Social members w...
• Set expectations low.
• Explain the vision for the future.
• Be specific about what to test. For example:
– Set up a pro...
SOFT LAUNCH - STAFF
• Have staff beta testers set up their profiles.
• Create a private group to serve as the sandbox.
• B...
JUMPSTARTING WORK
SET YOUR PRIORITIES FOR LAUNCH. EVERYTHING
IS IMPORTANT. SOME THINGS ARE CRITICAL.
PRIORITY WORK
Adminis...
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER
1. How do we monitor most efficiently and
effectively?
2. Who should respond?
– Can they respond fast ...
• Volunteer leaders
• Speakers
• Writers
• Industry influencers (consultants?)
• Digital extroverts from other
social spac...
• Direct and specific asks work better than
blast emails (which hardly work at all.)
• Try the phone. *gasp*
• Meet them f...
GETTING PEOPLE IN
NO ONE CARES
• Have your own profile.
• Add colleagues.
• Post
blogs/discussions/comme
nts.
• Access the...
MESSAGING SHOULD FOCUS ON
WIIFM (WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME)
EVERYONE CARES
• Showcase your accomplishments. (profile)
• Connect ...
WHEN IT COMES TO INVITATIONS,
KEEP IT SIMPLE
• Focus on easy tasks in the right order.
• Initial tasks: login for the firs...
ONBOARDING IS A MULTI-STEP PROCESS.
FOLLOW UP IS KEY.
• Thank folks who are active.
• Thank folks who have created a profi...
Questions?
LESSON 3: Reporting
Engagement Activity
WHY ENGAGEMENT?
ENGAGEMENT IS A MEANS TO AN END.
WHAT DO YOUR STAKEHOLDERS REALLY WANT?
• Support member retention?
• Supp...
2. TYPES OF ENGAGEMENT
Social
Technographics
Ladder
(Josh Bernoff, Forrester
Research, 2010.)
ENGAGEMENT IS NOT
ONE-SIZE-F...
TYPES OF ENGAGEMENT
MEASURE DIFFERENT ENGAGEMENT TYPES
TYPE WHAT TO MEASURE
Creator Post blogs, discussions, documents
Con...
TAILORING REPORTS
GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR REPORTING
TO DIFFERENT STAKEHOLDERS.
STAKEHOLDER DETAIL PRESENTATION FREQUENCY
Bo...
QUALITATIVE REPORTING
1. LISTENING REPORTS
– Provide links to top discussions, most active
groups, unique use cases
2. FEE...
BENCHMARKING AND
VISUALIZING
Well…we’ve got data. I
have no idea what it
means, but we’ve got
data.
VISUAL DATA HAS MORE IMPACT
THAN SPREADSHEETS.
1. Charts and graphs don’t have to be
fancy to add meaning.
2. Don’t create...
Questions?
LESSON 4: Content
Strategy for Your Community
COMMUNITY CONTENT IS
DIFFERENT
STRIKE THE RIGHT BALANCE BETWEEN TRADITIONAL
CONTENT AND MEMBER-GENERATED CONTENT
TRADITION...
DEVELOPING CONTENT FOR
COMMUNITY
Build a team
• SMEs (staff and members)
• Group leaders
• Marketing/communications
• Educ...
• How might you present the content to generate an active
discussion?
• How might you build community activity around educ...
CURATING CONTENT
Content curation is the process of sorting
through the vast amounts of content on the
web and presenting ...
THREE UNIQUE WAYS COMMUNITY
MANAGERS CURATE
1. CURATE IN CONTEXT
Enrich peer-to-peer discussions.
2. CURATE FOR GROUPS
Tar...
HAVE YOU ASKED YOUR CHAMPIONS FOR HELP TODAY?
1. ASK DIRECTLY
2. BE SPECIFIC
3. SET A DEADLINE
4. FOLLOW UP
WORKING WITH C...
THREE IDEAS FOR GETTING CHAMPIONS
TO CONTRIBUTE
1. Make them the leader of a group.
2. Reply to unanswered questions.
– Se...
PLOT YOUR CONTENT AND CHECK THE BALANCE.
1. Plan editorial as well as ENGAGEMENT.
2. Brainstorm posts and topics a month
a...
Questions?
LESSON 5: MANAGING
RISK IN YOUR
COMMUNITY
REFRAMING RISK
THREE SIMPLE STEPS
1. Identify
2. Analyze
3. Prioritize
REFRAMING RISK
1. Identify
2. Analyze
3. Prioritize
THREE SIMPLE STEPS
• What are the common
risks for a private
online co...
REFRAMING RISK
1. Identify
2. Analyze
3. Prioritize
THREE SIMPLE STEPS
• What are some actual
scenarios in the
community t...
TOP PRIORITY:
COSTLY AND
LIKELY
MIDDLE PRIORITY:
COSTLY BUT
NOT LIKELY
MIDDLE PRIORITY:
NOT COSTLY
BUT LIKELY
LOW PRIORITY...
POLICIES & MORE POLICIES
WEBSITE TERMS OF USE
• Welcome
• Purpose & Use (what you
can/can’t do)
• Properties (trademarks, ...
POLICIES & MORE POLICIES
SPECIAL POLICIES FOR YOUR PRIVATE COMMUNITY
• Social media policy (for staff and
volunteers)
• Co...
WHO OWNS THE CONTENT?
• Spell out a licensing agreement
for user-generated content in the
Website Terms of Use.
– Users fa...
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND PRIVACY RISKS
ARE A COMMUNITY MANAGER’S TOP PRIORITY
TIPS FOR MANAGING RISK IN YOUR COMMUNITY
• Post community rules and policies where they are
easy to access from any page i...
Questions?
LESSON 6: Private Communities in
the Digital Ecosystem
• Public sites (FB, T, LI, G+, P) are
important because that’s where your
people already spend time.
• A private community...
• People engage with your association in
public sites, too.
• If you only measure engagement in your
private community, yo...
WHO OWNS WHAT?
PRIVATE COMMUNITIES AND SOCIAL MEDIA OFTEN
LEAD SEPARATE LIVES IN DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS.
BEING PURPOSEFUL
Components of a good, site-specific plan:
EVERY SITE NEEDS A PLAN.
• Background
• Goals
• What does succe...
PROVIDE CLARITY FOR BOTH STAFF AND MEMBERS
How is the private
platform any different
from what we’re already
doing on Link...
CROSS-PLATFORM
CONTENT STRATEGY
WALLED GARDENS NEED WINDOWS.
1. TEASER CONTENT
– Executive summaries (lead to full report)
– Blog post summarizing a hot-topic discussion (lead to full...
Questions?
LESSON 7: What Does
Success Look Like?
GAUGING SUCCESS
1. At what stage is your community in its
development?
2. How many people are in the community?
3. How man...
EYE OF THE BEHOLDER
DIFFERENT STAKEHOLDERS DEFINE
SUCCESS DIFFERENTLY.
• Board
• Executive Director
• Staff who “own” the
...
TO BE SUCCESSFUL, YOU MUST RECONCILE
DIFFERENT VISIONS OF SUCCESS.
The board wants
business results. Staff is
all about th...
• Well known throughout the membership
• Recognized as an important benefit
• Accessed by a significant number of
members
...
1. How many members know
about the community?
2. How many members access
the community?
3. How many members are active
in ...
DEMYSTIFYING SUCCESS
THE MORE TRUSTED THE COMMUNITY MANAGER,
THE MORE SUCCESSFUL THE COMMUNITY
1. FORMAL STRUCTURE – lucky...
Questions?
Thank you!
Maddie Grant, CAE
maddie@socialfish.org
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Essentials of Online Community Management

A sampler from the SocialFish Private Community Management Program with tons of advice about online community strategy and tactics.

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Essentials of Online Community Management

  1. 1. ESSENTIALS OF ONLINE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT Maddie Grant, CAE maddie@socialfish.org www.socialfish.org
  2. 2. AGENDA 1. PLANNING YOUR COMMUNITY 2. LAUNCH 3. REPORTING 4. CONTENT STRATEGY 5. MANAGING RISK 6. DIGITAL ECOSYSTEM 7. DEFINING SUCCESS
  3. 3. LESSON 1: Planning Your Private Online Community
  4. 4. PURPOSE WRONG: WE NEED • We need to get more members engaged. • We need to generate non-dues revenue. • We need to draw members to the website. • We need to collect content from members. RIGHT: MEMBERS NEED • Members need a trusted environment to collaborate. • Members need a place to find trusted experts who can help them. • Members need a way to comment on technical information. MEMBER PERSPECTIVE IS CRITICAL. But wait…do they REALLY need that?
  5. 5. Examples of Business Purpose • Replace an outdated system with a platform that includes community functionality. • Provide a new way for members to participate in the association online. • Generate new revenue. BUSINESS PURPOSE MUST BE ALIGNED TO MEMBER PURPOSE.
  6. 6. • Community for member networking (because members should be posting on our site instead of LinkedIn.) • Community to build more member- generated content (because we’ve had trouble getting members to contribute content in the past.) EXAMPLES OF BUSINESS PURPOSE NOT ALIGNING TO MEMBER PURPOSE
  7. 7. COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT STRATEGY 1. Open vs closed 2. Group management 3. Community rules 4. Moderation and staff involvement 5. Champion involvement 6. Content and engagement planning SIX IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS
  8. 8. RESOURCE PLANNING • Administrative • Monitoring and responding • Content and engagement • Managing the platform • Training members • Training and strategizing with staff • Reporting community progress to stakeholders DEFINE THE WORK AND DELEGATE APPROPRIATELY
  9. 9. PROMOTION Did our new board member just say he’s never used the community? PROMOTING YOUR COMMUNITY IS A PROCESS THAT NEVER ENDS.
  10. 10. PROMOTION TWO-PRONGED APPROACH TO ONGOING PROMOTION MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING • Membership marketing and new member onboarding • Email newsletters • Features in magazine • Conference marketing and on- site activities • Promotion on website homepage and house ads • Platform email notifications for announcements, digests CHAMPION AND INFLUENCER MARKETING • Training and guidance for volunteer group leaders • Training and guidance for staff • Outreach to champions to keep the site active • Outreach to influencers to brainstorm ways they might like to use the community
  11. 11. Questions?
  12. 12. LESSON 2: Launching Your New Private Online Community
  13. 13. SOFT LAUNCH - MEMBERS ARCHETYPES OF USEFUL BETA GROUPS Archetype Size Activity Privacy Example Small and good 10-15 High Private Board, working group, event volunteers Large and social-media- savvy 50-150 Medium Public Technology special interest group, communications special interest group Up and coming 50-150 Medium Public Young professionals or student leaders Content creators 10-15 High Public Bloggers, authors, speakers, volunteer leaders Location- based 50-150 Medium Public An active chapter PICK THE RIGHT PEOPLE, AND MAKE YOUR FIRST MISTAKES AMONG FRIENDS.
  14. 14. • Tech-savvy volunteer group leaders. • Active listserv users who are asking for updated functionality. • Social members who may not be active in any of the other beta groups you’ve identified. BETA TESTERS WILL FEEL MORE INVESTED. SO WHO DO YOU NEED ON YOUR SIDE?
  15. 15. • Set expectations low. • Explain the vision for the future. • Be specific about what to test. For example: – Set up a profile with a picture. – Add a colleague and send a message. – Join a group/post to a discussion/comment • Tell them how to share feedback. – Set up a feedback group for beta testers. • Prepare them for technical glitches. SENDING A BASIC INVITE TO YOUR BETA TESTERS ISN’T ENOUGH
  16. 16. SOFT LAUNCH - STAFF • Have staff beta testers set up their profiles. • Create a private group to serve as the sandbox. • Be specific about what to test. • Use the group to share community-related information with staff. – Updates on technical progress – Launch plans – Staff policies, roles, responsibilities. • Tell them how to share feedback. • Prepare them for tech glitches. BUILD A SANDBOX AND USE IT.
  17. 17. JUMPSTARTING WORK SET YOUR PRIORITIES FOR LAUNCH. EVERYTHING IS IMPORTANT. SOME THINGS ARE CRITICAL. PRIORITY WORK Administrative X Monitoring and responding X Content and engagement Managing the platform X Training members Training and strategizing with staff Reporting community progress to stakeholders Especially engaging champions!
  18. 18. QUESTIONS TO ANSWER 1. How do we monitor most efficiently and effectively? 2. Who should respond? – Can they respond fast enough? – Are they set up on the platform to respond? 3. Can we streamline response for certain types of information? JUMPSTARTING WORK PRACTICING THE ART OF MONITORING AND RESPONDING
  19. 19. • Volunteer leaders • Speakers • Writers • Industry influencers (consultants?) • Digital extroverts from other social spaces JUMPSTARTING WORK ENGAGING CHAMPIONS STARTS WITH KNOWING WHO THEY ARE
  20. 20. • Direct and specific asks work better than blast emails (which hardly work at all.) • Try the phone. *gasp* • Meet them face-to-face. • Find ways to reward champion involvement. – Game mechanics – Promote content from champions – Create a volunteer role for champions CHAMPIONS NEED EXTRA CARE AND FEEDING
  21. 21. GETTING PEOPLE IN NO ONE CARES • Have your own profile. • Add colleagues. • Post blogs/discussions/comme nts. • Access the resource library. IT’S NOT ABOUT THE TOOLS. IT’S ABOUT WHAT MEMBERS CAN BUILD WITH THEM.
  22. 22. MESSAGING SHOULD FOCUS ON WIIFM (WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME) EVERYONE CARES • Showcase your accomplishments. (profile) • Connect with people who are solving the same challenges you face. (Or connect with your next employer, if they’re in transition.) (Add colleagues) • Get specific advice from industry experts who can answer your questions. (post blogs/discussions/comments.) • Share your perspectives on the latest (standards/regulations/effective practices) that are impacting the way you do business. (access the resource library). Look what you can build!
  23. 23. WHEN IT COMES TO INVITATIONS, KEEP IT SIMPLE • Focus on easy tasks in the right order. • Initial tasks: login for the first time and create a profile. • Follow up tasks: join a group, connect with colleagues. – Even better: suggest which groups or colleagues! • Follow up tasks: Read and comment on a recent discussion. – Even better: suggest active discussions to comment on.
  24. 24. ONBOARDING IS A MULTI-STEP PROCESS. FOLLOW UP IS KEY. • Thank folks who are active. • Thank folks who have created a profile...remind them of next steps they can take to get more out of the community. • Remind folks who have not yet logged in or completed their profile. Ask if they had a technical glitch, if they need a walkthrough, or if they just need more information about WIIFM.
  25. 25. Questions?
  26. 26. LESSON 3: Reporting Engagement Activity
  27. 27. WHY ENGAGEMENT? ENGAGEMENT IS A MEANS TO AN END. WHAT DO YOUR STAKEHOLDERS REALLY WANT? • Support member retention? • Support commerce and revenue goals? • Recruit potential volunteer leaders and content creators? • Capture member knowledge?
  28. 28. 2. TYPES OF ENGAGEMENT Social Technographics Ladder (Josh Bernoff, Forrester Research, 2010.) ENGAGEMENT IS NOT ONE-SIZE-FITS-ALL.
  29. 29. TYPES OF ENGAGEMENT MEASURE DIFFERENT ENGAGEMENT TYPES TYPE WHAT TO MEASURE Creator Post blogs, discussions, documents Conver- sationalist Post discussions, comments; send messages Critic Comment, rate/review Collector Add contacts, bookmark Joiner Join groups Spectator Sign in regularly, spend time on the site Inactive Sign in rarely or never
  30. 30. TAILORING REPORTS GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR REPORTING TO DIFFERENT STAKEHOLDERS. STAKEHOLDER DETAIL PRESENTATION FREQUENCY Board High level Visual Annual Volunteer leaders Group- specific Visual Annual ED/CEO High level Visual Quarterly Staff group managers Group- specific Spreadsheet Quarterly Your boss Comprehen- sive Spreadsheet Monthly Yourself Comprehen- sive Spreadsheet As needed
  31. 31. QUALITATIVE REPORTING 1. LISTENING REPORTS – Provide links to top discussions, most active groups, unique use cases 2. FEEDBACK AND TESTIMONIALS – Share feedback you receive from members by email, face-to-face, or even on the platform. – Share feedback from staff who are finding the community useful. TWO IMPORTANT WAYS TO SHOWCASE ENGAGEMENT BEYOND THE NUMBERS.
  32. 32. BENCHMARKING AND VISUALIZING Well…we’ve got data. I have no idea what it means, but we’ve got data.
  33. 33. VISUAL DATA HAS MORE IMPACT THAN SPREADSHEETS. 1. Charts and graphs don’t have to be fancy to add meaning. 2. Don’t create visualizations for every data point—just the ones you need to impress high-level stakeholders. 3. Visual data can be CRITICAL for communicating with the board.
  34. 34. Questions?
  35. 35. LESSON 4: Content Strategy for Your Community
  36. 36. COMMUNITY CONTENT IS DIFFERENT STRIKE THE RIGHT BALANCE BETWEEN TRADITIONAL CONTENT AND MEMBER-GENERATED CONTENT TRADITIONAL MEMBER-GENERATED
  37. 37. DEVELOPING CONTENT FOR COMMUNITY Build a team • SMEs (staff and members) • Group leaders • Marketing/communications • Education/conferences (staff and speakers) • Government relations • Owners and volunteers for other programs STOP DEVELOPING CONTENT—START DEVELOPING CONTENT CREATORS.
  38. 38. • How might you present the content to generate an active discussion? • How might you build community activity around education content or a conference? • How might you help groups use the community to talk amongst themselves? • What’s coming up (not finished yet) that warrants asking the community a question? ACT AS ADVISOR, EDITOR, AND CURATOR
  39. 39. CURATING CONTENT Content curation is the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme. (Beth Kanter, Content Curation Primer, Beth’s Blog | http://www.bethkanter.org/content-curation-101/)
  40. 40. THREE UNIQUE WAYS COMMUNITY MANAGERS CURATE 1. CURATE IN CONTEXT Enrich peer-to-peer discussions. 2. CURATE FOR GROUPS Target content to groups based on special interests. 3. CURATE FOR ENGAGEMENT Leave no question unanswered.
  41. 41. HAVE YOU ASKED YOUR CHAMPIONS FOR HELP TODAY? 1. ASK DIRECTLY 2. BE SPECIFIC 3. SET A DEADLINE 4. FOLLOW UP WORKING WITH CHAMPIONS
  42. 42. THREE IDEAS FOR GETTING CHAMPIONS TO CONTRIBUTE 1. Make them the leader of a group. 2. Reply to unanswered questions. – Send a link to the specific unanswered thread when you need their help. 3. Write about a hot topic. – Do an email “interview” then ask them to post their reply.
  43. 43. PLOT YOUR CONTENT AND CHECK THE BALANCE. 1. Plan editorial as well as ENGAGEMENT. 2. Brainstorm posts and topics a month ahead. 3. Assign content to your team, track deadlines, track follow-up. 4. Leave resources and flexibility for “pop up” content. USING A CONTENT CALENDAR
  44. 44. Questions?
  45. 45. LESSON 5: MANAGING RISK IN YOUR COMMUNITY
  46. 46. REFRAMING RISK THREE SIMPLE STEPS 1. Identify 2. Analyze 3. Prioritize
  47. 47. REFRAMING RISK 1. Identify 2. Analyze 3. Prioritize THREE SIMPLE STEPS • What are the common risks for a private online community? • What additional risks concern your staff and leadership?
  48. 48. REFRAMING RISK 1. Identify 2. Analyze 3. Prioritize THREE SIMPLE STEPS • What are some actual scenarios in the community that illustrate each risk? • How likely is that risk to happen? • How much could it cost the association?
  49. 49. TOP PRIORITY: COSTLY AND LIKELY MIDDLE PRIORITY: COSTLY BUT NOT LIKELY MIDDLE PRIORITY: NOT COSTLY BUT LIKELY LOW PRIORITY: NEITHER COSTLY NOR LIKELY 3. Prioritize LIKELY NOT LIKELYNOTCOSTLYCOSTLY
  50. 50. POLICIES & MORE POLICIES WEBSITE TERMS OF USE • Welcome • Purpose & Use (what you can/can’t do) • Properties (trademarks, service marks, designs, logos, etc.) • Content, Information & materials • Licensing for user-generated content • Copyright & Trademark Ownership, Notices & Infringement • No professional advice • Privacy • Security • No Warranties • Other sites (linking) • Members only area • Reporting content violations • Termination of access • Disclaimers, exclusion of damages, & limitation of liability • Indemnification • Governing law • Changes to terms • Contact us
  51. 51. POLICIES & MORE POLICIES SPECIAL POLICIES FOR YOUR PRIVATE COMMUNITY • Social media policy (for staff and volunteers) • Community rules and moderation policy • Policy for blog authors
  52. 52. WHO OWNS THE CONTENT? • Spell out a licensing agreement for user-generated content in the Website Terms of Use. – Users favor non-exclusive licenses. • Spell out how you will be able to use the content. – Promotion of the site? – Reuse in free member resources? – Reuse in publications or other products that will be sold? – Right to modify and reuse? – Will you give attribution to the content creator? SPELL IT OUT, BUT DON’T BE EVIL
  53. 53. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND PRIVACY RISKS ARE A COMMUNITY MANAGER’S TOP PRIORITY
  54. 54. TIPS FOR MANAGING RISK IN YOUR COMMUNITY • Post community rules and policies where they are easy to access from any page in the community. – Train staff and content creators on the policies. • Monitor and respond – Have backup when you’re away • Work with senior staff team and legal council on risk assessment – Use that team as a resource when something comes up.
  55. 55. Questions?
  56. 56. LESSON 6: Private Communities in the Digital Ecosystem
  57. 57. • Public sites (FB, T, LI, G+, P) are important because that’s where your people already spend time. • A private community is never a replacement for public social media platforms and a strategy for using them. REMEMBER THIS: A COMMUNITY IS DEFINED BY PEOPLE, NOT PLATFORM. And…people win by a landslide!
  58. 58. • People engage with your association in public sites, too. • If you only measure engagement in your private community, you risk undervaluing engagement in public social media sites. MEASURE ENGAGEMENT ACROSS THE ENTIRE ECOSYSTEM.
  59. 59. WHO OWNS WHAT? PRIVATE COMMUNITIES AND SOCIAL MEDIA OFTEN LEAD SEPARATE LIVES IN DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS.
  60. 60. BEING PURPOSEFUL Components of a good, site-specific plan: EVERY SITE NEEDS A PLAN. • Background • Goals • What does success look like? • Defining the audience • Growing the audience • Content Plan • Promoting association products, services, and membership • Moderation • Member involvement
  61. 61. PROVIDE CLARITY FOR BOTH STAFF AND MEMBERS How is the private platform any different from what we’re already doing on LinkedIn?
  62. 62. CROSS-PLATFORM CONTENT STRATEGY WALLED GARDENS NEED WINDOWS.
  63. 63. 1. TEASER CONTENT – Executive summaries (lead to full report) – Blog post summarizing a hot-topic discussion (lead to full, ongoing discussion) – Infographic of research (lead to full research report). 2. TRIAL MEMBERSHIP – Could also create a free, online-only membership – Helps generate leads for full membership 3. POST PASSWORD-PROTECTED CONTENT AS-IS – Lead with “FOR MEMBERS” and end with “Login Required” THREE CONTENT TACTICS TO ENTICE PEOPLE TO YOUR PRIVATE ONLINE COMMUNITY.
  64. 64. Questions?
  65. 65. LESSON 7: What Does Success Look Like?
  66. 66. GAUGING SUCCESS 1. At what stage is your community in its development? 2. How many people are in the community? 3. How many interactions does your community generate? 4. Are members exhibiting a sense of community in the way they interact? 5. Is the community generating ROI for the organization? FIVE IMPORTANT LENSES TO CONSIDER. HINT: THE FIRST ONE IMPACTS ALL THE REST.
  67. 67. EYE OF THE BEHOLDER DIFFERENT STAKEHOLDERS DEFINE SUCCESS DIFFERENTLY. • Board • Executive Director • Staff who “own” the community • Other staff • Other volunteers/volunte er leaders • Champions of the community • Active members • Outside world
  68. 68. TO BE SUCCESSFUL, YOU MUST RECONCILE DIFFERENT VISIONS OF SUCCESS. The board wants business results. Staff is all about their department and their process. Now what?
  69. 69. • Well known throughout the membership • Recognized as an important benefit • Accessed by a significant number of members • Used regularly by a smaller (but still significant) number of members SUCCESSFUL COMMUNITIES ARE…
  70. 70. 1. How many members know about the community? 2. How many members access the community? 3. How many members are active in the community? 4. What contributions are active members making to the community? 5. How does staff use the community? 6. How does the board use the community? 7. How do other volunteer groups use the community? 8. How do new members use the community? 9. How do members perceive the community? 10. How do prospective members perceive the community? VISIONING EXERCISE: IMAGINE THE COMMUNITY IS A HUGE SUCCESS IN [XX] MONTHS.
  71. 71. DEMYSTIFYING SUCCESS THE MORE TRUSTED THE COMMUNITY MANAGER, THE MORE SUCCESSFUL THE COMMUNITY 1. FORMAL STRUCTURE – lucky community managers are empowered. 2. GOING GUERILLA – most community managers find another way.
  72. 72. Questions?
  73. 73. Thank you! Maddie Grant, CAE maddie@socialfish.org

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