Part a report july

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Part a report july

  1. 1. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE ,BUILDING & DESIGN Research Unit for Modern Architecture Studies in Southeast Asia Foundation of Natural Build Environment ( FNBE ) Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 1
  2. 2. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation Content: 1. Introduction 2. A City 3. Investigation & Data Collection: The Ancient 4. Investigation & Data Collection: The present city 5. Investigation & Data Collection: The future city 6. The “X” City 7. The New “X” City / Or the new name 8. The Process and Progress 9. The Conclusion 10. References list Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 2
  3. 3. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 1.Introduction Elements of Natural and Built Environment ( ENBE ) final project – the Future City Representation .This project is divided by two part , part A (individual ) and part B (group ) .For part A , students have to prepare a video presentation to explain their proposal of the new city and an A4 report .For part B ,a group of 4 to 5,each group is required to make a model and prepare a A1 presentation board for the chosen city .Students can choose either an underground city,underwater city ,a floating on water city,city in the air or enhancing the existing city . Before proposing a future city,students have to understand , investigate and collect data about the past present and future cities to help them understand the development ,component and elements of the city better.The future city should focus on the needs of the people,the facilities, infrastructure,and how it will sustain in the future.The new propose city should be between 25-40 km with population of people between 150000 to 500000.The people living in the new city are Malaysian. Every city will need to sustain itself just like any living creature,city is unique by itself and alive.It grows,it populates,it requires food ,energy ,shelter and protection similar to nature .The character of a city relate back to the first project one. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 3
  4. 4. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 2.The City 2.1 The City Definition A city is a relatively large and permanent settlement. Many cities have a particular administrative, legal, or historical status based on local law.  Cities generally have complex systems : sanitation Utilities land usage Housing Transportation The concentration of development greatly facilitates interaction between people and businesses, benefiting both parties in the process. A big city or metropolis usually has associated suburbs and exurbs. Such cities are usually associated with metropolitan areas and urban areas , creating numerous business commuters traveling to urban centers for employment. Once a city Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 4
  5. 5. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation expands far enough to reach another city, this region can be deemed megalopolis. 2.2 History of cities The building of cities has a long and complex history. Although city planning as an organized profession has existed for less than a century, all cities display various degrees of forethought and conscious design in their layout and functioning. Early humans led a nomadic existence, relying on hunting and gathering for sustenance. Between 8,000 and 10,000 years ago, systematic cultivation of plants and the domestication of animals allowed for more permanent settlements. During the fourth millennium B.C., the requirements for the "urban revolution" were finally met: the production of a surplus of storable food, a system of writing, a more complex social organization, and technological advances such as the plough, potter's wheel, loom, and metallurgy. Cities exist for many reasons, and the diversity of urban forms can be traced to the complex functions that cities perform. Cities serve as centers of storage, trade, and manufacture. The agricultural surplus from the surrounding countryside is processed and distributed in cities. Cities also grew up around marketplaces, where goods from distant places could be exchanged for local products. Throughout history, cities have been founded at the intersections of transportation routes, or at points where goods must shift from one mode of transportation to another, as at river and ocean ports. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 5
  6. 6. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 2.3 What makes a great city #1 Vive la Différence!! - A truly great city should be a melting pot in every sense of the word – ethnically, sexually, religiously, politically, economically, etc. You name it, the city’s got it. Moreover, the differences are embraced and celebrated, never shoved aside or viewed as an afterthought; they make the city what it truly is. #2 Subways, Trains & Taxis - Every truly great city should have a top notch, all-hours transportation system to get you where you need to go, when you need to get there. From an extensive train/subway system and readily available taxis to people movers of every kind. Drinking and driving is a non-issue, and the trek home after a late might is an easy one. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 6
  7. 7. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation #3 It’s Alive! - Every truly great city feels like it’s got a life of its own – dynamic and vibrant; constantly changing and ever in motion. There’s always something new to see and do and when you’re away, you often feel like you’re missing out. That, in a way, the city is off doing things without you. #4 After Hours - A truly great city should ideally be open 24/7. Traditional business hours don’t dictate the ebb and flow of the city; multiple late night and after hours joints (shops, clubs, restaurants, bars) are on offer beyond the usual convenience store. You can have a full course dinner at 2am or have that one “last” drink at your favorite bar before calling it a night. Oh……and your night of boozing ends not because it’s last call but because you’re too pissed and broke for one more. #5 Music Inspired By - Every truly great city should have a truly great song written about it. It puts a city on the map and embeds it in our social consciousness in a way that only a great song can. Any city that doesn’t have its own song, is just, well, uninspired. Consider Sinatra’s New York, New York or Jay-Z’s Empire State of Mind; or, for that matter, Tom Petty’s Free Fallin or Missing Persons’ Walking in LA – would our perceptions of NY or LA be the same if we had never heard these songs? Probably not. #6 Oh! You Scotch Lassie - Every truly great city should have a proper whisky bar. For me this could take the following form: a top notch selection of single malts (with an emphasis on Islays and Highlands), a bartender well versed in whiskey lore, a long wooden bar for seating (no tables), dim lighting with an interesting and diverse clientele, music of all genres/eras being piped in, and (importantly) open late. Tokyo and, to a lesser extent, NYC are the only cities I’ve found that have whiskey bars that come anywhere close to matching this description. LA seems to be more about the martini, while others (sadly) believe that a range of Macallans constitutes a whiskey bar (SF, yes, I’m talking to you). London, on the other hand, is about pubs with emphasis on beer and dodgy white wine. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 7
  8. 8. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation #7 Sporty Spice - Every truly great city should be home to at least one major sports franchise be it football (English or American), basketball, baseball or hockey. The more, the better. Ideally, the team doesn’t suck or have a despised owner (e.g., NBA’s Sacramento Kings) but, rather, provides the city with a sense of pride (a rallying point for the masses?). At the very least, it’s a great tool for chatting up strangers. #8 The X-Factor - Every truly great city should have that special “something”, which is compellingly unique. It doesn’t matter if it’s a good or bad (which is more about perspective, anyway) but rather, that it can’t be found anywhere else. It defines the city and sets it apart. For instance, LA has its car culture, while Tokyo has its very distinctive Japanese culture. Likewise, NYC is known for its immigrant melting pot and city-that-never-sleeps energy, and San Francisco for its unattractive, yet undying provincialism. #9 Everything Is Illuminated - A truly great city should feel like anything is possible, that this is the place where you can truly be yourself and pursue your dreams and passions. It’s open to new ideas and ways of thinking. And has a history of greatness from its people because of it. New York City probably best exemplifies this. Like Jay-Z said, ‘New York, concrete jungle where dreams are made of. There’s nothin’ you can’t do.’ #10 Bang The Drum Slowly - A truly great city already knows how great it is. Its residents don’t boast, rationalize or need to be reminded – they know who they are and are completely comfortable with it. Petty rivalries and constant comparisons with other cities make little sense to them as they’re too busy being truly great. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 8
  9. 9. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 2.4 Constraints on City Form Cities are physical artifacts inserted into a preexisting natural world, and natural constraints must be respected if a settlement is to survive and prosper. Cities must conform to the landscape in which they are located, although technologies have gradually been developed to reorganize the land to suit human purposes. Moderately sloping land provides the best urban site, but spectacular effects have been achieved on hilly sites such as San Francisco, Rio de Janeiro, and Athens. Climate influences city form. For example, streets have been aligned to take advantage of cooling breezes, and arcades designed to shield pedestrians from sun and rain. The architecture of individual buildings often reflects adaptations to temperature, rainfall, snow, wind and other climatic characteristics. Cities must have a healthy water supply, and locations along rivers and streams, or near underground watercourses, have always been favored. Many large modern cities have outgrown their local water supplies and rely upon distant water sources diverted by elaborate systems of pipes and canals. City location and internal structure have been profoundly influenced by natural transportation routes. Cities have often been sited near natural harbors, on navigable rivers, or along land routes determined by regional topography. Finally, cities have had to survive periodic natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, and floods. The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 demonstrated how natural forces can undo decades of human labor in a very short time. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 9
  10. 10. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 3. Investigation & Data Collection: Ancient Cities 3.1 History of Mohenjo-daro Mohenjo-daro the modern name for the site, simply means Mound of the Dead in Sindhi. Mohenjo-daro is an archeological site in the province of Sindh, Pakistan. Built around 2600 BCE, it was one of the largest settlements of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization, and one of the world's earliest major urban settlements, contemporaneous with the civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Crete. Mohenjo-daro was abandoned in the 19th century BCE, and was not rediscovered until 1922. Significant excavation has since been conducted at the site of the city, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980 Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 10
  11. 11. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 3.2 What ancient city are you concentrating on ? I am concentrating on the street grid,drainage system and the architecture and urban infrastructure of the ancient Indus civilization city of Mohenjo Daro. The Indus Valley civilization was entirely unknown until 1921, when excavations in what would become Pakistan revealed the cities of Harappa and Mohenjo Daro . This mysterious culture emerged nearly 4,500 years ago and thrived for a thousand years, profiting from the highly fertile lands of the Indus River floodplain and trade with the civilizations of nearby Mesopotamia. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 11
  12. 12. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 3.3 What makes Mohenjo-daro a significant city and what are the details? The well-planned street grid an elaborate drainage system hint that the occupants of the ancient Indus civilization city of Mohenjo Daro were skilled urban planners with a reverence for the control of water. View of the site, showing an ordered urban layout Mohenjo-daro has a planned layout based on a street grid of rectilinear buildings. Most were built of fired and mortared brick; some incorporated sun-dried mud- brick and wooden superstructures. The sheer size of the city, and its provision of public buildings and facilities, suggests a high level of social organization. At its peak of development, Mohenjo-daro could have housed around 35,000 residents. The city is divided into two parts, the so-called Citadel and the Lower City. The Citadel – a mud-brick mound around 12 metres (39 ft) high – is known to have supported public baths, a large residential structure designed to house 5,000 citizens, and two large assembly halls. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 12
  13. 13. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation To the east of the citadel was the lower city, laid out in a grid pattern. Lower Town The streets were straight and were drained to keep the area sanitary. Mohenjo-Daro had a building with an underground furnace and dressing rooms, suggesting bathing was done in heated pools - as in modern day Hindu temples. The people of the city used very little stone in their construction. They preferred bricks, two types of bricks mainly - fired bricks, and wood bricks - which were created by using burnt wood ash. The city had a central marketplace, with a large central well. Individual households or groups of households obtained their water from smaller wells. Waste water was channeled to covered drains that lined the major streets. Some houses, presumably those of wealthier inhabitants, include rooms that appear to have been set aside for bathing, and one building had an underground furnace (known as a hypocaust), possibly for heated bathing. Most houses had inner courtyards, with doors that opened onto side-lanes. Some buildings had two stories. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 13
  14. 14. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 3.4 Conclusion about the city-Mohenjo-daro In my opinion ,I think Mohenjo-daro is a great city to refer to for my future city.Mohenjo-daro was one of the largest settlements of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization, and one of the world's earliest major urban settlements. The city based on a well-planned street grid of rectilinear buildings and drainage system . Location of Mohenjo-daro in the Indus Valley 3.5 What information or element that you can use to your new future city Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 14
  15. 15. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation • The drainage system • The well-planned grid street • The material used to build their buildings • The architecture and infrastructure 4. Investigation & Data Collection: Present Cities 4.1 History of New York City Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 15 History of New York City began with the first European visit to the area by Giovanni da Verrazzano, in command of the French ship La Dauphine, when he visited the region in 1524.
  16. 16. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 4.2 What city are you concentrating on ? I am concentrating on New York City. New York City, with a Census-estimated population of over 8.3 million in 2012, is the most populous city in the United States. It makes up over 40 percent of the population of New York state. It is known for its status as a center for finance and culture and for its status as the largest gateway for immigration to the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, New York City is also a destination of choice for many foreign visitors. Both the state and city were named for the 17th century Duke of York, future King James II of England Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 16
  17. 17. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 4.2 What makes New York City a significant city and what are the details? Geograph New York City is located in the Northeastern United States, approximately halfway between Washington, D.C. andBoston.The location at the mouth of the Hudson River, which feeds into a naturally sheltered harbor and then into the Atlantic Ocean, has helped the city grow in significance as a trading port. Tourism Tourism is one of New York City's most vital industries, with more than 40 million combined domestic and international tourists visiting each year in the past five years. Major destinations include the Empire State Building; Statue of Liberty; Ellis Island; Broadway theater productions; museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art; greenspaces such as Central Park and Washington Square Park; Rockefeller Center; Times Square; the Manhattan Chinatown; luxury shopping along Fifth and Madison Avenues; and events such as the Halloween Parade in Greenwich Village; the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade; the lighting of the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree; the St. Patrick's Day parade; seasonal activities such as ice skating in Central Park in the wintertime; the Tribeca Film Festival; and free performances in Central Park at Summerstage. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 17
  18. 18. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation The Metropolitan Museum of Art Media New York City is a center for the television, film, advertising, music, newspaper, and book publishing industries and is also the largest media market in North America (followed by Los Angeles, Chicago, and Toronto). Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios Sports The New York Marathon is one of the world's largest, and the 2004–2006 events hold the top three places in the marathons with the largest number of finishers, including 37,866 finishers in 2006. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 18
  19. 19. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation Entertainment and performing arts New York is a prominent location in the American entertainment industry, with films, television series, books, and other media being set there. As of 2008, New York City is the second largest center for the film industry in the United States. The Association of Independent Commercial producers is also based in New York City. The city has more than 2,000 arts and cultural organizations and more than 500 art galleries of all sizes. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 19
  20. 20. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is home of the New York Philharmonic and other performing arts. Architecture New York has architecturally noteworthy buildings in a wide range of styles and from the oldest section of which dates to 1656, to the modern One World Trade Center, the skyscraper currently under construction at Ground Zero in Lower Manhattan and currently the most expensive new office tower in the world. 19th-century rowhouses on tree-lined Kent Street in Brooklyn 4.3 Conclusion about the cities In my opinion,I think New York city is a great city to refer to for my future city as New York city has a lot of important element such as the geograph of the city that I can put in my future city.Besides that, what makes New York city so different from other present city is that there are severe state parks within the confines of New York City, including Clay Pit Ponds State Park Preserve, a natural area which Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 20
  21. 21. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation includes extensive riding trails, and Riverbank State Park, a 28-acre (110,000 m2 ) facility that rises 69 feet (21 m) over the Hudson River. Central Park is the most visited city park in the United States. 4.4 What information or element that you can use to your new future city • The open spaces in the city • The strategy geography of the city • The attraction (tourism) in the city • The architecture of the houses • The city center 5.Investigation & Data Collection: Future Cities Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 21
  22. 22. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 5.1 History of Dubai Dubai was constantly at odds with Abu Dhabi. In 1947, a border dispute between Dubai and Abu Dhabi on the northern sector of their mutual border, escalated into war. On 2 December 1971 Dubai, together with Abu Dhabi and five other emirates, formed the United Arab Emirates after the former protector, Britain, left the Persian Gulf in 1971. In 1973, Dubai joined the other emirates to adopt a uniform currency: the UAE dirham. Qatar and Bahrain chose to remain independent nations. In 1973, the monetary union with Qatar was dissolved and the UAE Dirham was introduced throughout the Emirates. During the 1970s, Dubai continued to grow from revenues generated from oil and trade, even as the city saw an influx of immigrants fleeing theLebanese civil war. Border disputes between the emirates continued even after the formation of the UAE; it was only in 1979 that a formal compromise was reached that ended hostilities. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 22
  23. 23. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 5.2 What city are you concentrating on? I am concentrating on one of the city in the United Arab Emirates located within the emirate ( Dubai ). The emirate of Dubai is located on the southeast coast of the Persian Gulf and is one of the seven emirates that make up the country. Today, Dubai has emerged as a cosmopolitan metropolis that has grown steadily to become a global city and a business and cultural hub of the Middle East and the Persian Gulf region. It is also a major transport hub for passengers and cargo. Although Dubai's economy was historically built on the oil industry, the emirate's Western-style model of business drives its economy with the main revenues now coming from tourism, aviation, real estate, and financial services. Dubai has recently attracted world attention through many innovative large construction projects and sports events. The city has become symbolic for its skyscrapers and high-rise buildings, such as the world's tallest Burj Khalifa, in addition to ambitious development projects including man-made islands, hotels, and some of the largest shopping malls in the region and the world. 5.3 What makes Dubai a significant city and what are the details? Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 23
  24. 24. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation Economy Dubai's gross domestic product as of 2011 was US $83.4 billion. Although Dubai's economy was built on the back of the oil industry, revenues from oil and natural gas currently account for less than 7% of the emirate's revenues. It is estimated that Dubai produces 50,000 to 70,000 barrels (11,000 m3 ) of oil a day and substantial quantities of gas from offshore fields. Tourism and retail Tourism is an important part of the Dubai government's strategy to maintain the flow of foreign cash into the emirate. Dubai's lure for tourists is based mainly on shopping, but also on its possession of other ancient and modern attractions. As of 2010, Dubai was the 7th most visited city of the world with 7.6 million visitors a year.[ Dubai is the most populous emirate of the seven emirates of United Arab Emirates. Dubai Mall is the largest mall in the world. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 24
  25. 25. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation World Trade Center. Dubai has established itself as a prominent regional hub for finance, trade, tourism, and shopping. Architecture Dubai has a rich collection of buildings and structures of various architectural styles. Many modern interpretations of Islamic architecture can be found here, due to a boom in construction and architectural innovation in the Arab World in general, and in Dubai in particular, supported not only by top Arab or international architectural and engineering design firms such as Al Hashemi and Aedas, but also by top firms of New York and Chicago. The Burj Khalifa is currently the tallest man-made structure in the world. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 25
  26. 26. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation The Burj Al Arab is a 5 star luxury hotel. Although the hotel is frequently described as "the world's only seven-Star hotel", the hotel management claims to never have done that themselves. Burj al Arab Transportation Transport in Dubai is controlled by the Roads and Transport Authority (RTA), an agency of the government of Dubai, formed by royal decree in 2005. The public transport network has in the past faced congestion and reliability issues which a large investment programme has addressed. Palm Jumeirah Monorail Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 26
  27. 27. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 5.4 Conclusion about the cities Dubai skyline from Zabeel Park In my opinion ,Dubai is a great modern city to refer to for my future city as the building in Dubai is supported not only by top Arab or international architectural and engineering design firms such as Al Hashemi and Aedas, but also by top firms of New York and Chicago. As a result of this boom, modern Islamic – and world – architecture has literally been taken to new levels in skyscraper building design and technology. 5.5 What information or element that you can use to your new future city • The significant skyscrapers • The sanitation issues • The tourism attraction • The high-technology transportation system Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 27
  28. 28. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 28
  29. 29. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 6 The “X” City 6.1 When did it start? My “ X “ city is Kuala Lumpur, the largest city in Malaysia ;it is also the nation's capital. The history of Kuala Lumpur began in the middle of the 19th century with the rise of the tin extraction industry. Kuala Lumpur was founded in 1857 at the confluence of the Gombak and Klang rivers. After Kuala Lumpur burnt down in 1881, Kapitan Yap decided to rebuild Kuala Lumpur in brick and tile to replace the dangerous attap houses. He set up Kuala Lumpur's first school and a shelter for the homeless. Yap's Kuala Lumpur was very much a rough frontier town as Yap himself was a member of the Hai San triad and gang warfare was common. Kapitan Yap licensed brothels, casinos and drinking saloons. Sir Frank Swettenham was at this time appointed Resident of Selangor and he was the person responsible for making Kuala Lumpur the seat of administration of Selangor. It was under his rule that after Kapitan Yap's death the city continued to prosper. When the Federated Malay States were incorporated with Swettenham in charge in 1896, Kuala Lumpur was made the capital. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 29
  30. 30. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 6.2 Population Kuala Lumpur is the federal capital and most popular city in Malaysia. The city covers an area of 243 km2 (94 sq mi) and has an estimated population of 1.6 million as of 2012. Greater Kuala Lumpur, also known as the Klang Valley, is an urban agglomeration of 5.7 million as of 2010.It is among the fastest growing metropolitan regions in the country, in terms of population and economy. Religion Islam Malaysia is multicultural and multiconfessional. The dominant religion in Malaysia is Islam, whose followers make up 61 per cent of the population. Islam is recognised as the state religion of Malaysia, although the country has a secular constitution. Debate exists about whether Malaysia should be a secular or Islamic state, with politics often becoming entwined with religion. Chinese religion Many Malaysian Chinese practice a mixture of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. Although Buddhism was influential prior to the arrival of Islam, the majority of the current Chinese population arrived during British rule of Malaya. Chinese New Year is celebrated as a national holiday. Hinduism The majority of the Tamil's who make up 9 per cent of Malaysia's population practice Hinduism. Hinduism was influential prior to Islam, but current adherents are mostly descended from migrant communities from Tamil Nadu who came to Malaya to work on British rubber plantations. A small community of migrants from North India also exists 6.3 What would be a good future city for them? The multi cultural in Malaysia is something that is unique that you cant get it in other country .For example ,Malaysia have a lot of religion places such as the Chinese temple ,Mosque and Indian temple.This different type of religion places can be place in a future city for the people. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 30
  31. 31. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 7 The Vida city Vida = LIFE (in Spanish ) ALIVE CITY Why is it on air ? People can no longer stay below the ground ( underground city )or on the ground (floating city ) as it is destroyed by the strong earthquake disaster. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 31
  32. 32. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation The important characteristic and elements of Vida city Vida city is a city build on air .The high-technology infrastructure ,the efficient transportation system and the tourism area that makes the city significant and attract lots of other traders and invester. TRANSPORT SYSTEM Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 32
  33. 33. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation GEOGRAPH City planning has seen many different schemes for how a city should look. For my city : Rectangular with Alleys grid . SERVICES The basic service that Vida city have : • hospital • pharmacy • theatre / cultural house • museum • library • hotel services • basic and secondary schools • public transport • gardens / urban parks Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 33
  34. 34. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 8 The Process & Progress The Transport System Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 34
  35. 35. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 35
  36. 36. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation The Energy System Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 36
  37. 37. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 9 Conclusion Through this ENBE final project ,I realized that time management is very crucial in order to complete a well-planned presentation or work .Besides that the advises given by lecturers every weekly tutorial can really help to improve the progress of our work .In my opinion , I think that this ENBE final project is actually quite fun doing it as it is all about planning a well-organised city that involved a lot of amazing architecture.I also get to learned a lot bout city from shape ,geometery to the very detail of how a city formed. Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 37
  38. 38. ENBE | Final Project | Part A – Report | The Future City Representation 10 Reference Links http://www.nexteraenergyresources.com http://www.economist.com http://www.gmanetwork.com http://places.designobserver.com http://en.wikipedia.org http://www.clker.com Your Name | Your Student ID | Group d/w/n | FNBE April 2013 | Taylor’s University 38

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