Scouting for Youth with Disabilities Part I-III Presentation prepared by Lindsay Foster Doctoral Dissertation Candidate 20...
DEFINITIONS
Definition of Disability <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>An individual is considered to have a “disability” if she or he: </li></ul></...
Definition of Special Needs <ul><li>&quot;Special needs have generally been identified through the  Individuals with Disab...
IDEA Definition of Child with a Disability <ul><li>IDEA defines a &quot;child with a disability&quot; as a &quot;child... ...
<ul><li>Pleasantville </li></ul>
Why Is Inclusion Important? <ul><li>270, 036  male students (ages 6 to 21) in the state of Texas were served under the Ind...
SIGNIFICANT DATES
Timeline of Inclusion of Scouts with Disabilities <ul><li>Since 1910, Scouts with disabilities have participated fully in ...
HOW TO ORGANIZE THE SCOUTING FOR YOUTH WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM IN YOUR COUNCIL
Council Advisory Committee <ul><li>Objective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The council advisory committee for youth with disabilit...
Committee Responsibilities & Objectives  <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Promote inclusion of youth with disabilities into traditional...
Committee Responsibilities & Objectives  continued…   <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Promote and complete nomination procedures for B...
Committee Responsibilities & Objectives  continued…   <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Promotes attendance of volunteers and staff to t...
HANDLING SCOUTS WITH  DISABILITIES WITH IN A UNIT
Working with Scouts with Disabilities <ul><li>A clear and open understanding should exist between the unit leadership and ...
Inclusion v. Disability Specific Units <ul><li>Inclusion  Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Scout may be more likely to learn “normal...
Inclusion v. Disability Specific Units <ul><li>Disability-Specific Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Unit can provide a safe haven fo...
BSA “Inclusion” Philosophy <ul><li>To treat members with disabilities as much like other members as possible. Scouts with ...
Key Points to Think About When Working With Scouts With Disabilities <ul><li>Talk directly to the disabled Scout. </li></u...
Recognition of Needs <ul><li>Youth with disabilities want to participate but generally depend on others to introduce Scout...
Timeless Values <ul><li>Use common sense – treat youth with respect and dignity. </li></ul><ul><li>Be understanding – peop...
Attitudes Toward People with Disabilities <ul><li>Understanding only comes from information. </li></ul><ul><li>~ Dr. Willi...
Adaptive Approaches Materials Adaptation Architectural Adaptation Leisure Companion Adaptation Cooperative Group Adaptatio...
Adaptive Approaches –  Materials Adaptation <ul><li>A Cub Scout has limited hand strength and is trying to earn his Whittl...
Adaptive Approaches –  Architectural Adaptation <ul><li>A Scout using a wheelchair is unable to go hiking because the trai...
Adaptive Approaches –  Leisure Companion Adaptation <ul><li>A Cub Scout cannot stay on task and runs around. </li></ul><ul...
Adaptive Approaches –  Cooperative Group Adaptation <ul><li>A Cub Scout has difficulty remembering the steps in a project....
Adaptive Approaches –  Behavioral Adaptation <ul><li>A Scout is unable to participate because of low concentration levels....
Introduction to Advancement
Advancement Committee Policies and Procedures Manual, No. 33080 <ul><li>The BSA’s policy has always been to treat members ...
Sample Guidelines for Questions to Ask for Membership and Advancement Youth’s name What is/are his/her disability/disabili...
Scouting for Youth with Disabilities Part IV-VIII Presentation prepared by Lindsay Foster Doctoral Dissertation Candidate ...
ADULT LEADERSHIP SUPPORT
Leadership Techniques <ul><li>Keep a confidential record of each youth for background information. All youth have differen...
Leadership Techniques Continued… <ul><li>Demonstrate personal discipline with respect, punctuality, accuracy, conscientiou...
Leadership Techniques Continued… <ul><li>Give instruction to youth with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain eye conta...
Leadership Techniques Continued… <ul><li>Avoid ridicule and criticism. </li></ul><ul><li>When disciplining: remain calm, s...
THE ROLE OF PARENTS
The Role of Parents Prior to joining the unit, parents and the Scout with disabilities should meet with the Scout leader t...
SELECTING THE RIGHT ADULT LEADERSHIP
Leadership  is Opportunity <ul><li>Scouting service can provide very deep, personal satisfaction. </li></ul><ul><li>Wise l...
<ul><li>Cub Scouts </li></ul>
Cub Scouts <ul><li>Advancement program is flexible  but  requirements should not be watered down or eliminated for boys wi...
Cub Scouts <ul><li>Cub Scouts has added a chapter to the revised and enhanced  Cub Scout Leader Book  entitled “Cub Scouts...
<ul><li>Boy Scouts </li></ul>
Boy Scouts <ul><li>Advancement occurs individually, within the patrol and also within the troop. </li></ul><ul><li>Advance...
Boy Scouts <ul><li>No council, district, unit or individual has the authority to add to, or to subtract from, any advancem...
Boy Scouts <ul><ul><ul><li>The council committee responsible for advancement must then secure approval of the council exec...
Boy Scout Alternate Requirements <ul><li>If a Scout’s disability hinders him in completing a particular requirement or mer...
Alternate Requirements Steps: Tenderfoot, Second Class, & First Class Ranks <ul><li>Do as many standard requirements as po...
Alternate Requirements Steps: Eagle Scout Rank Merit Badges <ul><ul><li>The Application for Alternate Eagle Scout Rank Mer...
Application for Alternate Eagle Scout Rank Merit Badge Instructions
Purpose of the Eagle Scout Award A recipient of the Eagle Scout Award is a Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or qualified* Venture...
Boy Scouting Program Support
<ul><li>Venturing Scouts </li></ul>
The young adult program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women who are 14 (and have completed the 8 th  grad...
<ul><li>To provide a pathway to many different experiences, five Venturing Bronze awards are available. One each for the f...
Venturing Gold and Silver Awards <ul><li>Gold Award </li></ul><ul><li>Requires a crew review. </li></ul><ul><li>Silver Awa...
Venturing Additional Awards <ul><li>Ranger Award </li></ul><ul><li>Identifies a Venturer who is highly skilled in a variet...
Mission Statement <ul><li>It is the mission of Learning for Life to enable young people to become responsible individuals ...
Purpose and Rationale <ul><li>Offers seven programs designed to support schools and community-based organizations in their...
Recognitions
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Part 1 Scouting For Youth With Disabilities

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Dissertation (Part 1 of 3) for Commissioner's College Doctoral Candidate Lindsay Foster. This is part of the training module for the Working With Scouts With Special Needs manual. This is a work in progress and has not yet been presented for approval by Longhorn Council

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Part 1 Scouting For Youth With Disabilities

  1. 1. Scouting for Youth with Disabilities Part I-III Presentation prepared by Lindsay Foster Doctoral Dissertation Candidate 2011 Longhorn Council, Boy Scouts of America
  2. 2. DEFINITIONS
  3. 3. Definition of Disability <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>An individual is considered to have a “disability” if she or he: </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities – seeing, hearing, speaking, walking, breathing, performing manual tasks, learning, caring for oneself, and working. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Has a record of such an impairment, or </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Is regarded as having such an impairment. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Definition of Special Needs <ul><li>&quot;Special needs have generally been identified through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act . Young children who have been diagnosed as having developmental delays, or any child who has been evaluated as having one of a limited list of disabilities specified in IDEA are considered as having special needs when they require special education and related services (20 U.S.C. 1401 and 34 C.F.R. §300.8). Nearly 7 million children with disabilities receive special education services under IDEA, including 270,000 infants and toddlers, 715,000 preschool-age children, and 6 million students from ages 6 through 21 (U.S. Department of Education, 2007).&quot; (Brennan & Rosenzweig, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Brennan, E.M, & Rosenzweig, J.M. (2008, May). Parents of children with disabilities and work-life challenges: Presentation summary . Presented at the Alfred P. Sloan Work and Family Research Network Panel Meeting, Chestnut Hill, MA. </li></ul>
  5. 5. IDEA Definition of Child with a Disability <ul><li>IDEA defines a &quot;child with a disability&quot; as a &quot;child... with mental retardation, hearing impairments (including deafness), speech or language impairments, visual impairments (including blindness), serious emotional disturbance..., orthopedic impairments, autism, traumatic brain injury, other health impairments, or specific learning disabilities; AND, who... [because of the condition] needs special education and related services.&quot; </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Pleasantville </li></ul>
  7. 7. Why Is Inclusion Important? <ul><li>270, 036 male students (ages 6 to 21) in the state of Texas were served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>This represents approximately 11% of the male student population in Texas. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Data Analysis System (DANS), OMB #1820-0043:&quot;Children with Disabilities Receiving Special Education Under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act,&quot; 2009. Data updated as of July 15, 2010. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Texas Public Schools Enrollment 2009-2010 http://www.moakcasey.com/articles/viewarticledoc.aspx?AID=1810&DID=1910 </li></ul>
  8. 8. SIGNIFICANT DATES
  9. 9. Timeline of Inclusion of Scouts with Disabilities <ul><li>Since 1910, Scouts with disabilities have participated fully in Scouting. Significant dates in Scouting’s program for youth with disabilities include the following: </li></ul>1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 1990 1950 1970 1930 1962 1965 1923 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1978 1979 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1980 1987 2007
  10. 10. HOW TO ORGANIZE THE SCOUTING FOR YOUTH WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM IN YOUR COUNCIL
  11. 11. Council Advisory Committee <ul><li>Objective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The council advisory committee for youth with disabilities provides guidance to the council in providing Scouting for youth with disabilities and special needs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Helps the council increase the percentage of youth with disabilities who are being served. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2. Promotes awareness and opportunities for youth with disabilities. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>3. Develops positive working relationships between the council and organizations and individuals in the community serving people with disabilities. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>4. Advises the council on plans, programs, and techniques to better serve youth with disabilities. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Committee Responsibilities & Objectives <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Promote inclusion of youth with disabilities into traditional Scouting units, where available. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Review and utilize national resources related to Scouting for youth with disabilities as a guide. Help conduct new unit campaign, including identification, cultivation, and sales to potential chartered organizations to serve disability specific units. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identify, recruit and train adequate, qualified volunteers to sever on the committee and to serve as program aides. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Help to identify and solicit the special needs portion of the council budget through support of grants, organizations, and individuals. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Seek opportunities to conduct workshops for the council staff, traditional unit leaders, and disability-specific unit leaders. Examples could include: the annual University of Scouting, Commissioner College, and roundtables. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Committee Responsibilities & Objectives continued… <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Promote and complete nomination procedures for BSA and non-BSA awards and recognitions for volunteers and youth in the council’s special needs programs. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Advise the council advancement committee on national policies and local options to meet the needs of Scouts with disabilities. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provide guidance and resources to the council, districts, and units for barrier-free facilities and technologies or overcoming existing barriers. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assists the council camping committee with plans to assure accessible, barrier-free camping facilities by: a) helping to obtain funds to make facilities barrier-free and b) recommending special equipment needed for persons with disabilities. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Develops and staffs councilwide event for all disabilities, using traditional Scouts and leaders as staff. Such events will be underwritten as much as possible by community resources. Maximizing public exposure should be considered. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Committee Responsibilities & Objectives continued… <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Promotes attendance of volunteers and staff to the national Philmont Training Center’s special-needs conference each summer. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provides for informational and educational releases to both internal and external sources. Develops promotional materials for external use. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In cooperation with all districts, provides activities, advancement, camping training, and roundtable support to units and leaders working with youth with disabilities. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Establishes short-term task forces to carry out special projects. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ensures that the needs of youth with disabilities are included in the local council strategic plan, integrating the key issues from the National Strategic Plan. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 15. HANDLING SCOUTS WITH DISABILITIES WITH IN A UNIT
  16. 16. Working with Scouts with Disabilities <ul><li>A clear and open understanding should exist between the unit leadership and the parents or guardians of the Scout with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Unit leaders should know the strengths and support needs of the Scout, and in some cases, may need to discuss any limitations of physical activity. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Inclusion v. Disability Specific Units <ul><li>Inclusion Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Scout may be more likely to learn “normal” behaviors. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Normal” Scouts may learn tolerance and acceptance. </li></ul><ul><li>Greater number of inclusive units available. </li></ul><ul><li>Often disabled Scouts are with their peers from mainstreamed school. </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusion Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders may have no training. </li></ul><ul><li>Scouts and parents may not understand the disabled youth’s presence in the unit. </li></ul><ul><li>Older or larger disabled Scout may not “fit in” with others. </li></ul><ul><li>Usage and timing of medications or treatments may be impractical for participation. </li></ul><ul><li>Disabled youth may have behavioral issues that prevent him from participation. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Inclusion v. Disability Specific Units <ul><li>Disability-Specific Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Unit can provide a safe haven for youth who are more comfortable around youth of similar disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>May be the only opportunity for the Scout to participate in Scouting. </li></ul><ul><li>Youth with severe or profound disabilities may need the resources that a disability-specific unit provides. </li></ul><ul><li>For Scouts over 21, unit is a chance to be with intellectual peers. </li></ul><ul><li>Disability-Specific Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult to draw the line between “normal” and disabled. </li></ul><ul><li>Placement may not reflect “real life” inclusion with others who have no disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Unit may lack appropriate behavior modeling. </li></ul><ul><li>May be difficult to find leadership for a disability-specific unit. </li></ul><ul><li>This type of unit may not fit well into standard or typical district or Council programming. </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation issues may arise. </li></ul><ul><li>Funding may be difficult to obtain. </li></ul><ul><li>Accessibility may be an issue. </li></ul>
  19. 19. BSA “Inclusion” Philosophy <ul><li>To treat members with disabilities as much like other members as possible. Scouts with disabilities should participate in the same program as do their peers. </li></ul><ul><li>It has been traditional to make some accommodations in advancement requirements if absolutely necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>This policy is designed to help Scouts with disabilities succeed along with their peers. </li></ul><ul><li>Practical suggestions are made to leaders as to adaptive approaches and methods they can use. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Key Points to Think About When Working With Scouts With Disabilities <ul><li>Talk directly to the disabled Scout. </li></ul><ul><li>Assume the disabled Scout is capable of doing things. </li></ul><ul><li>Realize the disabled Scout has the same needs as others – to be accepted and to feel a part of the group – and to have TRUE friends. </li></ul><ul><li>Help the disabled Scout when help is wanted. </li></ul><ul><li>When help is wanted, do not try to over-help or do everything for him. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand some disabled Scouts may take what you say literally. </li></ul><ul><li>It is OK to get frustrated about things not going as they should. Do not make things worse by acting out yourself. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Recognition of Needs <ul><li>Youth with disabilities want to participate but generally depend on others to introduce Scouting to them. </li></ul><ul><li>Working with disabilities might mean adapting the ordinary program to make it as worthwhile as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Be enthusiastic about helping youth with disabilities. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Timeless Values <ul><li>Use common sense – treat youth with respect and dignity. </li></ul><ul><li>Be understanding – people with disabilities have the same responsibilities and obligations that you have. </li></ul><ul><li>Be patient. Don’t hurry; try to match their pace. </li></ul><ul><li>Be natural. Don’t worry about using words related to the disability (ex. “See you later” with a blind youth) </li></ul><ul><li>Speak directly to the youth – NOT his/her companion. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t assume the person is sick. Most are healthy. You cannot “catch” a disability. </li></ul><ul><li>Help make your community accessible. </li></ul><ul><li>Key words to remember – tolerance, inclusion, acceptance, and mainstreaming. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Attitudes Toward People with Disabilities <ul><li>Understanding only comes from information. </li></ul><ul><li>~ Dr. William C. Menninger </li></ul>
  24. 24. Adaptive Approaches Materials Adaptation Architectural Adaptation Leisure Companion Adaptation Cooperative Group Adaptation Behavioral Adaptation EXAMPLE SOLUTION
  25. 25. Adaptive Approaches – Materials Adaptation <ul><li>A Cub Scout has limited hand strength and is trying to earn his Whittling Chip. </li></ul><ul><li>Substitute a bar of soap or balsa wood. (Use a plastic knife for safety.) </li></ul>
  26. 26. Adaptive Approaches – Architectural Adaptation <ul><li>A Scout using a wheelchair is unable to go hiking because the trail is inaccessible. </li></ul><ul><li>Substitute a “field trip for “hike.” </li></ul><ul><li>Select an alternate trail accessible to all. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Adaptive Approaches – Leisure Companion Adaptation <ul><li>A Cub Scout cannot stay on task and runs around. </li></ul><ul><li>An adult or youth can become a “buddy” for that Cub Scout. </li></ul><ul><li>Have the Cub become a “leader’s helper.” </li></ul>
  28. 28. Adaptive Approaches – Cooperative Group Adaptation <ul><li>A Cub Scout has difficulty remembering the steps in a project. </li></ul><ul><li>List the steps on paper and work in cooperative groups to ensure completion for everyone. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Adaptive Approaches – Behavioral Adaptation <ul><li>A Scout is unable to participate because of low concentration levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the Scout’s interests, and if needed, talk with his parents or guardians about a behavioral plan. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan activities of short duration. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Introduction to Advancement
  31. 31. Advancement Committee Policies and Procedures Manual, No. 33080 <ul><li>The BSA’s policy has always been to treat members with disabilities as much like other members as possible, but with necessary accommodations in advancement requirements approved by local council if needed. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Sample Guidelines for Questions to Ask for Membership and Advancement Youth’s name What is/are his/her disability/disabilities? Does he/she have an IEP (ARD) or 504 Plan from his/her school that can be used with his/her involvement with Scouting? Can he/she walk without assistance? With assistance? How? Crutches? Wheelchair? Other types of support? Does he/she wear a prosthesis? Can he/she adjust it? If not, can he/she direct others in adjusting it? Does he/she wear a helmet for protection against falls? When and for what purpose? Can he/she eat independently? What support is needed? Does he/she need a special diet or allergies? If so, attach list. Does he/she dress independently? What support is needed? Does he/she have normal hearing? Wear a hearing aid? Is he/she taking any medications? What types and dosages? Does he/she self-medicate? If not, who does it and how? Is there a written medication schedule? Does he/she have normal vision? Wear glasses? For what purpose? Does he/she wear a collection device? Does he/she toilet independently? What support is needed?
  33. 33. Scouting for Youth with Disabilities Part IV-VIII Presentation prepared by Lindsay Foster Doctoral Dissertation Candidate 2011 Longhorn Council, Boy Scouts of America
  34. 34. ADULT LEADERSHIP SUPPORT
  35. 35. Leadership Techniques <ul><li>Keep a confidential record of each youth for background information. All youth have different needs; they all have special needs, but some require more attention than others. </li></ul><ul><li>Make a personal visit to the parents and the new Scout with a disability to learn about the Scout, his or her abilities and preferences, to identify individual support needs and to learn if he or she knows any other youth in the unit. </li></ul><ul><li>Get permission before contacting health professionals or specialists (such as special education teachers, physical therapists, doctors, or others) who are able to assist with physical or health support needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Accept the Scout as a person and give him or her the respect that is given to any other Scout. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Leadership Techniques Continued… <ul><li>Demonstrate personal discipline with respect, punctuality, accuracy, conscientiousness, dignity, and dependability. </li></ul><ul><li>Become involved with the Scout for whom you are responsible – show the Scout you care. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide constant encouragement and teach the Scout to self-reinforce. </li></ul><ul><li>Judge accomplishments by what the Scout CAN do not by what someone says he must do or by what you believe he or she cannot do. </li></ul><ul><li>Reinforce achievement to cause repeated behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Expect the Scout to give his or her best effort. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Leadership Techniques Continued… <ul><li>Give instruction to youth with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain eye contact with the youth but DO NOT force return eye contact. </li></ul><ul><li>Make directions clear and concise. (Give 1 or 2 steps at a time.) </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure the Scout understands BEFORE beginning a task. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide supervision and discipline. </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to the Scout and seriously consider what the Scout has to say. </li></ul>
  38. 38. Leadership Techniques Continued… <ul><li>Avoid ridicule and criticism. </li></ul><ul><li>When disciplining: remain calm, state the infraction of the rule, and avoid debate or arguing with the Scout. </li></ul><ul><li>Redirect misbehavior to appropriate behaviors. </li></ul><ul><li>Administer consequences IMMEDIATELY and monitor for appropriate behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Enforce unit rules consistently. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not praise or reinforce falsely. </li></ul><ul><li>Look for the underlying cause for misbehavior and change the circumstance. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the strengths of the Scout and use those strengths to serve others. </li></ul>
  39. 39. THE ROLE OF PARENTS
  40. 40. The Role of Parents Prior to joining the unit, parents and the Scout with disabilities should meet with the Scout leader to explain the prospective Scout’s needs. The Scout should be present at the pre-joining conference so that he or she CLEARLY understand the expectations of Scouts in the unit. Allow the Scout to contribute as much as possible. The following are some of the issues that should be discussed: General Characteristics Physical Capabilities Mental Capabilities Medication Discipline Diet and Eating Restrictions Independent Living or Self-Care Skills Transportation Unit Operation
  41. 41. SELECTING THE RIGHT ADULT LEADERSHIP
  42. 42. Leadership is Opportunity <ul><li>Scouting service can provide very deep, personal satisfaction. </li></ul><ul><li>Wise leaders expect and anticipate problems but do not consider problems to be overwhelming. </li></ul><ul><li>Experienced leaders see the youth the with disabilities as a youth with an individual difference. </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders must cast aside preconceived notions; preconceptions get in the way of important, and otherwise obvious, truths. </li></ul><ul><li>Unit committee members should understand that the person they choose should be the kind of role model that they would want their child to associate with during the child’s formative years. </li></ul><ul><li>Involving adults with disabilities in leadership positions is an excellent way to create a stronger awareness of youth with disabilities. </li></ul>
  43. 43. <ul><li>Cub Scouts </li></ul>
  44. 44. Cub Scouts <ul><li>Advancement program is flexible but requirements should not be watered down or eliminated for boys with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A Cub Scout who has a disability may be given permission by the Cubmaster and Pack committee to substitute electives for a few of the achievement requirements that are beyond his abilities. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give periodic recognition at den meetings (immediate recognition kit, den doodles, den advancement chart) and prompt recognition at Pack meetings when he earns a badge. </li></ul></ul>
  45. 45. Cub Scouts <ul><li>Cub Scouts has added a chapter to the revised and enhanced Cub Scout Leader Book entitled “Cub Scouts With Disabilities.” </li></ul><ul><li>This chapter assists with methods for adaptations, rank advancement, Cub Scout outings, and developing sensitivity for different abilities. </li></ul><ul><li>The Cub Scout Leader How-To Book also contains a chapter on Cub Scouts with disabilities and will help leaders design activities within the capabilities and interest of Cub Scout aged boys who are challenged. </li></ul>
  46. 46. <ul><li>Boy Scouts </li></ul>
  47. 47. Boy Scouts <ul><li>Advancement occurs individually, within the patrol and also within the troop. </li></ul><ul><li>Advancement involves three kinds of recognition: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Six rank advancements: Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle. No merit badges are required for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Immediate recognition using My Scout Advancement Trail as each requirement is completed. Scouts receive colored beads as requirements for Tenderfoot (white), Second Class (green), and First Class (red) are completed. In this way, Scouts can work on requirements for more than one rank at the same time, although badges must be earned in order. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More than 100 merit badges in a wide variety of fields. </li></ul></ul>
  48. 48. Boy Scouts <ul><li>No council, district, unit or individual has the authority to add to, or to subtract from, any advancement requirements. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Scout is expected to meet the requirements as stated – no more and no less. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>He is to do exactly what is stated. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If it says “show or demonstrate” he must do that. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The same holds true for such words as “make,” “list,” “in the field,” and “collect, identify, and label.” </li></ul></ul></ul>
  49. 49. Boy Scouts <ul><ul><ul><li>The council committee responsible for advancement must then secure approval of the council executive board. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Scout Executive must attach a letter to the application indicating that the executive board has approved the application. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In the application of these policies for Scouts with special needs, reasonable accommodation in the performance of requirements for advancement may be made. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>May include extension of time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May include adaptation of facilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May include use of equipment or necessary devices consistent with the known physical or mental limitations of the Scout </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use common sense! </li></ul></ul>
  50. 50. Boy Scout Alternate Requirements <ul><li>If a Scout’s disability hinders him in completing a particular requirement or merit badge, he may wish to apply for alternate requirements for Tenderfoot through First Class ranks or for an alternate merit badge. </li></ul><ul><li>A Scout who has a permanent physical or mental disability and is unable to complete all of the requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, or First Class rank may submit a request to the council advancements committee to complete alternate requirements. </li></ul>
  51. 51. Alternate Requirements Steps: Tenderfoot, Second Class, & First Class Ranks <ul><li>Do as many standard requirements as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Secure a medical statement. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare a request for alternate requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>The advancement committee reviews the request. </li></ul>
  52. 52. Alternate Requirements Steps: Eagle Scout Rank Merit Badges <ul><ul><li>The Application for Alternate Eagle Scout Rank Merit Badges, No. 58-730, includes the necessary information to apply properly for alternate merit badges on the route to Eagle Scout. </li></ul></ul>
  53. 53. Application for Alternate Eagle Scout Rank Merit Badge Instructions
  54. 54. Purpose of the Eagle Scout Award A recipient of the Eagle Scout Award is a Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or qualified* Venturer who applies the principles of the Scout Oath and Law in his daily life. He has achieved the qualities listed below because of determination and persistence through the advancement program.
  55. 55. Boy Scouting Program Support
  56. 56. <ul><li>Venturing Scouts </li></ul>
  57. 57. The young adult program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women who are 14 (and have completed the 8 th grade) through the age of 20. <ul><li>Venturing’s purpose is to provide positive experiences that help young people mature and prepare to become responsible and caring adults. </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scouting is also part of Venturing. </li></ul>
  58. 58. <ul><li>To provide a pathway to many different experiences, five Venturing Bronze awards are available. One each for the five areas listed above. </li></ul>Venturing Bronze Award
  59. 59. Venturing Gold and Silver Awards <ul><li>Gold Award </li></ul><ul><li>Requires a crew review. </li></ul><ul><li>Silver Award </li></ul><ul><li>Highest award in Venturing </li></ul><ul><li>Requires proficiency in emergency preparedness, participation in Ethics in Action, and completion of the Venturing Leadership Skills Course. </li></ul><ul><li>Requires a crew review </li></ul>
  60. 60. Venturing Additional Awards <ul><li>Ranger Award </li></ul><ul><li>Identifies a Venturer who is highly skilled in a variety of outdoor skills, trained in outdoor safety, and ready to lead or assist others </li></ul><ul><li>The Quest Award </li></ul><ul><li>Requires Venturers to learn about fitness and sports </li></ul>The TRUST Award <ul><li>Helps Venturers to learn about their own religion and how it affects their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>Also learn about other cultures as well as how to better serve their community </li></ul>
  61. 61.
  62. 62. Mission Statement <ul><li>It is the mission of Learning for Life to enable young people to become responsible individuals by teaching positive character traits, career development, leadership, and life skills so they can make ethical choices and achieve their full potential. </li></ul>
  63. 63. Purpose and Rationale <ul><li>Offers seven programs designed to support schools and community-based organizations in their efforts to prepare youth to handle the complexities of contemporary society and to enhance their self-confidence, motivation, and self-esteem. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on character development and career education. </li></ul><ul><li>Help youth develop social and life skills, assist in character development, and help youth formulate positive personal values. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepares youth to make ethical decisions that will help them achieve their full potential. </li></ul><ul><li>Makes academic learning fun and relevant to real-life situations. </li></ul>
  64. 64.
  65. 65. Recognitions

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