Msu Schneider2007

403 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Msu Schneider2007

  1. 1. Stephen H. Schneider*  Department of Biological Sciences  and  Woods Institute for the Environment  Stanford University, California, USA.  “Key Vulnerabilities” and the  Risks of Climate Change?  Michigan State University  Ides of March 2007 *[Website for more info: www.climatechange.net.] 
  2. 2. The role of the scientific community  #1: Provide climate change scenarios  The IPCC’s Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) ­ 2000
  3. 3. What will be our future  emissions?  Higher  Lower  Source: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
  4. 4. WG 1Approved AR 4 SPM:  In this Summary for Policymakers, the  following terms have been used to indicate  the assessed likelihood, using expert  judgment, of an outcome or a result:  Virtually certain > 99% probability of  occurrence, Extremely likely > 95%, Very  likely > 90%, Likely > 66%, More likely than  not > 50%, Unlikely < 33%, Very  unlikely < 10%, Extremely unlikely < 5%.
  5. 5. ??? Approved  uncertainties  language for  10­33%  likelihood:  “unlikely” 
  6. 6. Pre­  Plenary  proposed
  7. 7. “Low”  “High”
  8. 8. From the Sports Pages: Type 1 Error Aversion  Denver is allowing 7.3 points per game.  Broncos defensive end Kenard Lang was  asked to predict a point total for the Colts  offense this Sunday:  "I‘m not predicting nothing. All I'm going to  predict is a good game and I'm hoping the  Broncos come out on top. If I make  predictions and it goes the opposite way,  then I'll look like a horse's fanny. And I ain't 
  9. 9. From the Sports Pages: Type 1 Error Aversion  Denver is allowing 7.3 points per game.  Broncos defensive end Kenard Lang was  asked to predict a point total for the Colts  offense this Sunday:  "I'm not predicting nothing. All I'm going to  predict is a good game and I'm hoping the  Broncos come out on top. If I make  predictions and it goes the opposite way,  then I'll look like a horse's fanny. And I ain't 
  10. 10. From the Sports Pages: Type 1 Error Aversion  Denver is allowing 7.3 points per game.  Broncos defensive end Kenard Lang was  asked to predict a point total for the Colts  offense this Sunday:  "I'm not predicting nothing. All I'm going to  predict is a good game and I'm hoping the  Broncos come out on top. If I make  predictions and it goes the opposite way,  then I'll look like a horse's fanny. And I ain't  trying to look like a horse's fanny right now."
  11. 11. “Type 1” versus “Type 2" errors and their  consequences  Decision Forecast  Forecast  proves false  proves true  Accept forecast—  Type I  Correct  policy response  error  decision  follows  [Squandered  resources]  Reject or ignore  Correct  Type 2  forecast (e.g., “too  Decision  error  much” uncertainty)—  no policy response 
  12. 12. “Type 1” versus “Type 2" errors and their  consequences  Decision Forecast  Forecast  proves false  proves true  Accept forecast—  Type I  Correct  policy response  error  decision  follows  [Squandered  resources]  Reject or ignore  Correct  Type 2  forecast (e.g., “too  Decision  error  much” uncertainty)—  [Unmitigated  damages]  no policy response 
  13. 13. “Type 1” versus “Type 2" errors and their consequences  Decision Forecast proves  Forecast proves  false  true  Accept forecast—policy response  Type I error  Correct decision  follows  Reject or ignore forecast (e.g., “too  Correct Decision  Type 2 error  much” uncertainty)—no policy  response  *************************************************  Role of Scientists:  Assess Risk (= Consequence X Probability of Occurrence)  as function of alternative policy choices ;  confidence in the assessment of risks;  distribution of risks and benefits; traceable account of aggregations.  ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Role of Decision­makers: Negotiate acceptability of risks and policies that alter  risks; make policy choices; guide assessment process. 
  14. 14. “Type 1” versus “Type 2" errors and their consequences  Decision Forecast proves  Forecast proves  false  true  Accept forecast—policy response  Type I error  Correct decision  follows  Reject or ignore forecast (e.g., “too  Correct Decision  Type 2 error  much” uncertainty)—no policy  response  *************************************************  Role of Scientists:  Assess Risk (= Consequence X Probability of Occurrence)  as function of alternative policy choices ;  confidence in the assessment of risks;  distribution of risks and benefits; traceable account of aggregations.  ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Role of Decision­makers: Negotiate acceptability of risks and policies that alter  risks; make policy choices; guide assessment process. 
  15. 15. Competing paradigms between science and policy  communities.  It is common in policy analysis to refer to an  incorrect forecast that was taken to be true as a  “type 1 error” and a decision to ignore an  uncertain forecast that turns out to be true as a  “type 2 error”.  The prime paradigm within the  scientific community is to view the type 1 error  as the more egregious mistake, whereas within  the policy arena, the type 2 error is often more  concerning.  Decision­makers often prefer to  hedge against a potentially damaging event  rather than wait for it to possibly happen.
  16. 16. Chapter 19 (draft, do not quote) identifies seven criteria for  assessing and defining key vulnerabilities:  • magnitude  • distribution  • timing  • persistence and reversibility  • likelihood and confidence  • potential for adaptation  • “importance” of the vulnerable system  No single metric can adequately  aggregate  the diversity of key  vulnerabilities, nor determine their ranking.
  17. 17. What will be our future  emissions?  Higher  Lower  Source: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
  18. 18. Not nearly  stabilized at  2100 Nearly  stabilized at  2100 
  19. 19. Emissions Scenarios  6  Overshoot to  5  stabilization Radiative Forcing  4  600 ppm CO  e  2  3  500 ppm CO   e  2 2  Gradual increase to  stabilization  1  0  2000  2050  2100  2150  2200  2250  Year  (O’Neill and Oppenheimer, 2004) 
  20. 20. DT Source: Schneider and Mastrandrea, PNAS, Oct 2005 
  21. 21. Exceedence of  DAI threshold:  dependence on  scenarios Source: Schneider and Mastrandrea, PNAS, Oct 2005 
  22. 22. The great “greenhouse  gamble”…(for 2100)  <1°C  (4.1%; 1 in 24 odds)  1 to 1.5°C  (11.4%; 1 in 9 odds)  1.5 to 2°C  (20.6%; 1 in 5 odds)  2 to 2.5°C  (22.5%; 1 in 4 odds)  2.5 to 3°C  (16.8%; 1 in 6 odds)  3 to 4°C  (16.2%; 1 in 6 odds)  4 to 5°C  (4.6%; 1 in 22 odds)  >5°C  (3.8%; 1 in 26 odds) Source: MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Climate Change 
  23. 23. HOW CAN WE EXPRESS THE VALUE OF A CLIMATE POLICY UNDER UNCERTAINTY? Compared with  What would we A NEW WHEEL NO POLICY buy with STABILIZATION with lower odds of CO2 at 550 ppm? of EXTREMES
  24. 24. HOW CAN WE EXPRESS THE VALUE OF A CLIMATE POLICY UNDER UNCERTAINTY? Compared with  What would we A NEW WHEEL NO POLICY buy with STABILIZATION with lower odds of CO2 at 550 ppm? of EXTREMES
  25. 25. Risk = Probability x  Consequence  [What metrics of harm?]  ­$/ton C avoided  ­lives lost/ton C avoided  ­species lost/ton C avoided  ­increased inequity/ton C avoided*  ­quality of life degraded/ton  *Perception that prime generators of the risks are not accepting  responsibility for their emissions or helping victims to adapt (e.g.,  OECD countries refusing to join in Kyoto Protocol) itself creates  risks.  [Source: “The Five Numeraires”, Schneider, Kuntz­Duriseti and Azar 2000]
  26. 26. Risk of catastrophic fires  (and other disturbances) (and other disturbances) 
  27. 27. Agriculture: The Wine Industry • ‘Potentially devastating’ effect on industry •Water availability •Temperature •Storms
  28. 28. A u s t r a l i a n   w i n e   r e g i o n s  M e a n   J a n u a r y   T e m p e r a t u r e   o f   2 3   C   h i g h l i g h t e d  ( m a x i m u m   v a l u e   ( $ / h e c t a r e ) )  Climate change scenario A1B  MJT23C2000  CSIRO Mk 3 model  Leanne Webb CSIRO and Melbourne University
  29. 29. A u s t r a l i a n   w i n e   r e g i o n s  M e a n   J a n u a r y   T e m p e r a t u r e   o f   2 3   C   h i g h l i g h t e d  ( m a x i m u m   v a l u e   ( $ / h e c t a r e ) )  MJT23C2000  Climate change scenario A1B  MJT23C2030  CSIRO Mk 3 model  Leanne Webb CSIRO and Melbourne University
  30. 30. A u s t r a l i a n   w i n e   r e g i o n s  M e a n   J a n u a r y   T e m p e r a t u r e   o f   2 3   C   h i g h l i g h t e d  ( m a x i m u m   v a l u e   ( $ / h e c t a r e ) )  MJT23C2000  MJT23C2030  Climate change scenario A1B  MJT23C2050  CSIRO Mk 3 model  Leanne Webb CSIRO and Melbourne University
  31. 31. The cost to stabilize the atmosphere  Global GDP  250  200  Trillion USD/yr  Bau  150  350 ppm  450 ppm  100  550 ppm  50  0  1990  2000  2010  2020  2030  2040  2050  2060  2070  2080  2090  2100  Year  Source: Azar & Schneider, 2002.
  32. 32. The cost to stabilise the atmosphere  Global GDP  Delay time to 500% richer  per capita with tough  250  climate policy ~ 1­2 years 200  Trillion USD/yr  Bau  150  350 ppm  450 ppm  100  550 ppm  50  0  1990  2000  2010  2020  2030  2040  2050  2060  2070  2080  2090  2100  Year  Source: Azar & Schneider, 2002. 
  33. 33. Questions?  Comments??
  34. 34. Risk = Probability x  Consequence  [What metrics of harm?]  ­$/ton C avoided  ­lives lost/ton C avoided  ­species lost/ton C avoided  ­increased inequity/ton C avoided*  ­quality of life degraded/ton  *Perception that prime generators of the risks are not accepting  responsibility for their emissions or helping victims to adapt (e.g.,  two OECD countries refusing to join in Kyoto Protocol) itself  creates risks.  [Source: “The Five Numeraires”, Schneider, Kuntz­Duriseti and Azar 2000]
  35. 35. Munich Re:  “We need to stop this dangerous  experiment humankind is  conducting on the Earth’s  atmosphere.”
  36. 36. What does “dangerous” climate  change really mean?
  37. 37. Article 2 of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change  (UNFCCC) states that: “The ultimate objective of this Convention  and any related legal instruments that the Conference of the  Parties may adopt is to achieve, in accordance with the relevant  provisions of the Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas  concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent  dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system”.  The Framework Convention on Climate Change further suggests  that “Such a level should be achieved within a time frame  sufficient · to allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, · to ensure that food production is not threatened and · to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable  manner.”
  38. 38. Climate Uncertainty  •  Inherent uncertainty in projections of future  climate  •  Best guess à Range à PDFs à à PDFs 
  39. 39. Climate Uncertainty Climate Uncertainty 
  40. 40. Climate Uncertainty  0.04  Density 0.03  0.02  0.01  0  0  1  2  3  4  5  o  Temperature Change above 2000 (  C) 
  41. 41. Climate Uncertainty  0.04  Temperature  probability density  0.03  Density  function for 2100  0.02  based on PDF for  climate sensitivity 0.01  0  0  1  2  3  4  5  o  Temperature Change above 2000 (  C) 
  42. 42. The great “greenhouse  gamble”…  <1°C  (4.1%; 1 in 24 odds)  1 to 1.5°C  (11.4%; 1 in 9 odds)  1.5 to 2°C  (20.6%; 1 in 5 odds)  2 to 2.5°C  (22.5%; 1 in 4 odds)  2.5 to 3°C  (16.8%; 1 in 6 odds)  3 to 4°C  (16.2%; 1 in 6 odds)  4 to 5°C  (4.6%; 1 in 22 odds)  >5°C  (3.8%; 1 in 26 odds) Source: MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Climate Change 
  43. 43. Governor of  California:  80% reduction in  emissions by 2050
  44. 44. Strategic Plan for SA
  45. 45. ‘Changes in the location of  Goyder’s line’ 2070  1  2  3  4  5  Quorn  6  Port Augusta  7  8  9  10  Adelaide  Goyder’s  Line  Study Site  Mark Howden CSIRO sustainable ecosystems  Howden and Hayman – Greenhouse 2005
  46. 46. Governor of California:  80% reduction in emissions by 2050 Premier of South Australia:  60% reduction in emissions by 2050 
  47. 47. Risk = Probability x  Consequence  [What metrics of harm?]  ­$/ton C avoided  ­lives lost/ton C avoided  ­species lost/ton C avoided  ­increased inequity/ton C avoided*  ­quality of life degraded/ton  *Perception that prime generators of the risks are not accepting  responsibility for their emissions or helping victims to adapt (e.g.,  OECD countries refusing to join in Kyoto Protocol) itself creates  risks.  [Source: “The Five Numeraires”, Schneider, Kuntz­Duriseti and Azar 2000]

×