Engineer Golden Jubilee Edition - Science and Technology Quiz

6,301 views

Published on

Engineer Golden Jubilee Edition - Science and Technology Quiz, with answers. Conducted on October 31st and November 1st, 2009.

Published in: Education, Technology
2 Comments
12 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
6,301
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
15
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1,018
Comments
2
Likes
12
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Engineer Golden Jubilee Edition - Science and Technology Quiz

  1. 1. Prepare to boldly go: Where No Quizzer Has Gone Before @ Engineer Golden Jubilee Edition Science and Technology Quiz <ul><li>Conducted by: </li></ul><ul><li>Sandeep Albert Mathias </li></ul><ul><li>Kaustubh Thirumalai </li></ul>
  2. 2. Prelims
  3. 3. Prelims Format <ul><li>No. of questions = 27 </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum No. of finalists = 8 </li></ul><ul><li>Maximum Team Size = 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Post-graduate STUDENTS are allowed. </li></ul><ul><li>No restrictions on having all team-members from the same college. Mixed teams are also allowed. </li></ul>
  4. 4. 1. Whose papers? <ul><li>“ Time, Clocks, and the Ordering of Events in a Distributed System”, </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Byzantine Generals Problem”, </li></ul><ul><li>“ Distributed Snapshots: Determining Global States of a Distributed System”, </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Part-Time Parliament”. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>2. What we normally see is strings of random characters falling from the top to the bottom of the screen. This effect is associated with a famous franchise (like the opening crawl of Star Wars) that has led to a lot of things in popular culture, mainly screen-savers. What is it? </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>3. X strongly believed in causal determinism, which is expressed in the following quotation from the introduction to the Essai philosophique sur les probabilités : </li></ul><ul><li>“ We may regard the present state of the universe as the effect of its past and the cause of its future. An intellect which at a certain moment would know all forces that set nature in motion, and all positions of all items of which nature is composed, if this intellect were also vast enough to submit these data to analysis, it would embrace in a single formula the movements of the greatest bodies of the universe and those of the tiniest atom; for such an intellect nothing would be uncertain and the future just like the past would be present before its eyes.” </li></ul><ul><li>This intellect is often referred to as X's demon. Id X. </li></ul>
  7. 7. 4. What is missing? Also, connect. <ul><li>P = NP Problem </li></ul><ul><li>Hodge Conjecture </li></ul><ul><li>? </li></ul><ul><li>Riemann Hypothesis </li></ul><ul><li>Yang-Mills Existence And Mass Gap </li></ul><ul><li>Navier-Stokes Existence And Smoothness </li></ul><ul><li>Birch And Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>5. The Statue of Liberty was a gift from France to the United States. X's design for the interior structural elements of the statue allowed for the statue to become a reality. The Statue of Liberty quickly became a national symbol of freedom in the United States and gave citizens a sense of pride and it became a great tourist attraction and brought many people to New York, boosting the economy. Several Americans living in France were pleased by the gift to their country and in turn, built a ¼ scale bronze model which stands approximately 2 km north of _________. X please. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>6. Due to X’s work, X’s papers dating from the fag end of the 19 th century are considered too dangerous to handle. They have to be kept in lead lined boxes, and can only be handled using protective clothing. Id X. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>7. The epitaph on his tomb initially read &quot;First Muslim Nobel Laureate&quot; but, the word &quot;Muslim&quot; was later erased on the orders of a local magistrate, leaving the nonsensical &quot;First Nobel Laureate&quot;. Id X. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>8. The X Prizes are awarded annually by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) for notable and outstanding research, applied or fundamental, in Biological, Chemical, Earth, Atmosphere, Ocean and Planetary, Engineering, Mathematical, Medical and Physical Sciences. The purpose of the prize is to recognize outstanding work in science and technology. The award is named after the founder Director of the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research. X? </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>9. For many years, Roy Glauber Jr. used to clean the stage during the X Awards. However, he missed doing so in 2005. Why? Also, id X. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>10. This theory is based on the idea that the biomass self-regulates the conditions on the planet to make its physical environment (in particular temperature and chemistry of the atmosphere) on the planet more hospitable to the species which constitute its &quot;life&quot;. The hypothesis properly defined this &quot;hospitality&quot; as a full homeostasis. A model that is often used to illustrate the original hypothesis is the so-called Daisyworld simulation. What hypothesis are we talking about? </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>11. * The satirical newspaper The Onion published an article entitled &quot;I, X&quot; as a pun on Asimov's I, Robot, in which an anthropomorphic X gives a speech parodying much of the angst experienced by robots in Asimov's fiction, including a statement of the &quot;Three Laws of X&quot;: </li></ul><ul><li>1. A X may not immerse a human being or, through lack of flotation, allow a human to come to harm. </li></ul><ul><li>2. A X must obey all commands and steering input given by its human X, except where such input would conflict with the First Law. </li></ul><ul><li>3. A X must preserve its own flotation as long as such preservation does not conflict with the First or Second Law. </li></ul><ul><li>X please. </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>12. * Before World War I, X worked at the University of Karlsruhe, where he and Carl Y developed the X Process between 1894 and 1911. He received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work in 1918. </li></ul><ul><li>During World War I, X came up with X’s rule, regarding chemical weapons: “For a given poisonous gas, C = t*k where C is the concentration of the gas (mass per unit volume), t is the amount of time necessary to breathe the gas, in order to produce a given toxic effect, and k is a constant, depending on both the gas and the effect. </li></ul><ul><li>X’s wife committed suicide, after she oversaw the use of chemical weapons at Ypres. X developed the Z – X Cycle along with fellow German scientist Max Z. </li></ul><ul><li>All we want is X. Yaaru? </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>13. X and Y were able to transmute elements, creating nitrogen from boron, phosphorous from aluminum and silicon from magnesium. These won them the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1935. Id X and Y (order interchangeable). </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>14. Arthur Sasse wanted to get X smiling on his birthday. X was tired, and so, in order to get rid of the photographer, X did something which Sasse took a picture of. On June 19, 2009, the photograph was auctioned at a record $74,324, the most for any picture of X. Id X and say what he did. </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>15. * X is a game that demonstrates the futility of war according to the following conditions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Both players play optimally, and one player always moves first. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In war, both players have units of equal strength. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All units are exactly equal, and differences between them are only in how they look. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Also, the number of nodes of the game tree decrease after every move. </li></ul><ul><li>Theorem: It is impossible to design an artificial intelligence to win every game of X. </li></ul><ul><li>Id the game X. </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>16. * X's On The Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Substances marks the beginning of chemical thermodynamics by integrating chemical, physical, electrical, and electromagnetic phenomena into a coherent system. It introduced concepts such as chemical potential, phase rule, and others, which form the basis for modern physical chemistry. Popular American writer Bill Bryson describes X's paper as &quot;the Principia of thermodynamics&quot;. Whose paper? </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>17. X, born on 10 March 1957, in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala is an Indian theoretical physicist. He is currently Distinguished Professor at the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, (IUCAA) at Pune, India. His principal fields of research are Cosmology and the interface between Gravity and Quantum theory. X has received several national and international awards including the Birla Science Prize (1991), the Millennium Medal, Al-Khwarizmi International Award, Sackler Distinguished Astronomer, Miegunah Fellowship Award and the G.D. Birla Award for Scientific Research. His work has won awards from the Gravity Research Foundation, USA five times, in 1984, 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008. He is an elected Fellow of the three National Academies of Science in India. Some of his research papers have been rated as the ‘most influential paper of the year’. He has also been awarded the Padma Shri by the Government of India in the year 2007. ID X. </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>18. Charles H. Duell resigned from his post in 1899. Although most of us may not remember him, we know the reason he gave for his resignation. The reason was dependant on the job that he did before resigning. What was the reason he gave (which is now quoted widely)? </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>19. In 1872, Leland Stanford, had taken a position on a popularly-debated question of the day. He decided to prove that he was right scientifically. Using a series of photographs, Eadward Muybridge proved Stanford correct. What was the question? Also explain what resulted from Muybridge’s experiment, which has substantial significance in the film world. </li></ul>
  23. 23. <ul><li>20. * One can imagine that the X was created by starting with a line segment, then recursively altering each line segment as follows: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Divide the line segment into three segments of equal length. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Draw an equilateral triangle that has the middle segment from step 1 as its base and points outward. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Remove the line segment that is the base of the triangle from step 2. </li></ul><ul><li>ID the fractal. </li></ul>
  24. 24. 21. Debate discussion funda. <ul><li>Date: 30 June, 1860 </li></ul><ul><li>Place: Oxford University Museum </li></ul><ul><li>Chairman: John Henslow </li></ul><ul><li>Participants: John William Draper, Thomas Henry Huxley, Bishop Samuel Wilberforce, Benjamin Brodie, Joseph Dalton Hooker and Robert FitzRoy. </li></ul>
  25. 25. 22. * Tribute to what? <ul><li><play A.avi> </li></ul>
  26. 26. <ul><li>23. Id the concept which this Star Trek episode introduced into the franchise & popular culture? </li></ul>
  27. 27. 24. Whose currency?
  28. 28. 25. After whom are the L-points named?
  29. 29. 26. * Whose death did Franklin and Gosling announce on 18 th July 1952?
  30. 30. 27. Id BOTH missing people
  31. 31. End Of Prelims! Hand In your sheets! Ensure that you have written your names, team-name, college and contact information Answers will be announced once all the sheets are handed in.
  32. 32. Prelims Answers
  33. 33. 1. Whose papers? <ul><li>“ Time, Clocks, and the Ordering of Events in a Distributed System”, </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Byzantine Generals Problem”, </li></ul><ul><li>“ Distributed Snapshots: Determining Global States of a Distributed System”, </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Part-Time Parliament”. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Slide Left Blank
  35. 35. Leslie Lamport
  36. 36. <ul><li>2. What we normally see is strings of random characters falling from the top to the bottom of the screen. This effect is associated with a famous franchise (like the opening crawl of Star Wars) that has led to a lot of things in popular culture, mainly screen-savers. What is it? </li></ul>
  37. 37. Slide Left Blank
  38. 38. Matrix Digital Rain
  39. 39. <ul><li>3. X strongly believed in causal determinism, which is expressed in the following quotation from the introduction to the Essai philosophique sur les probabilités : </li></ul><ul><li>“ We may regard the present state of the universe as the effect of its past and the cause of its future. An intellect which at a certain moment would know all forces that set nature in motion, and all positions of all items of which nature is composed, if this intellect were also vast enough to submit these data to analysis, it would embrace in a single formula the movements of the greatest bodies of the universe and those of the tiniest atom; for such an intellect nothing would be uncertain and the future just like the past would be present before its eyes.” </li></ul><ul><li>This intellect is often referred to as X's demon. Id X. </li></ul>
  40. 40. Slide Left Blank
  41. 41. Laplace’s Demon
  42. 42. 4. What is missing? Also, connect. <ul><li>P = NP Problem </li></ul><ul><li>Hodge Conjecture </li></ul><ul><li>? </li></ul><ul><li>Riemann Hypothesis </li></ul><ul><li>Yang-Mills Existence And Mass Gap </li></ul><ul><li>Navier-Stokes Existence And Smoothness </li></ul><ul><li>Birch And Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture </li></ul>
  43. 43. Slide Left Blank
  44. 44. Millennium Problems <ul><li>The missing one is the Poincaré Conjecture. </li></ul>
  45. 45. <ul><li>5. The Statue of Liberty was a gift from France to the United States. X's design for the interior structural elements of the statue allowed for the statue to become a reality. The Statue of Liberty quickly became a national symbol of freedom in the United States and gave citizens a sense of pride and it became a great tourist attraction and brought many people to New York, boosting the economy. Several Americans living in France were pleased by the gift to their country and in turn, built a ¼ scale bronze model which stands approximately 2 km north of _________. X please. </li></ul>
  46. 46. Slide Left Blank
  47. 47. Gustav Eifel
  48. 48. <ul><li>6. Due to X’s work, X’s papers dating from the fag end of the 19 th century are considered too dangerous to handle. They have to be kept in lead lined boxes, and can only be handled using protective clothing. Id X. </li></ul>
  49. 49. Slide Left Blank
  50. 50. Marie Curie
  51. 51. <ul><li>7. The epitaph on his tomb initially read &quot;First Muslim Nobel Laureate&quot; but, the word &quot;Muslim&quot; was later erased on the orders of a local magistrate, leaving the nonsensical &quot;First Nobel Laureate&quot;. Id X. </li></ul>
  52. 52. Slide Left Blank
  53. 53. Abdus Salam
  54. 54. <ul><li>8. The X Prizes are awarded annually by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) for notable and outstanding research, applied or fundamental, in Biological, Chemical, Earth, Atmosphere, Ocean and Planetary, Engineering, Mathematical, Medical and Physical Sciences. The purpose of the prize is to recognize outstanding work in science and technology. The award is named after the founder Director of the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research. X? </li></ul>
  55. 55. Slide Left Blank
  56. 56. Sir Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar
  57. 57. <ul><li>9. For many years, Roy Glauber Jr. used to clean the stage during the X Awards. However, he missed doing so in 2005. Why? Also, id X. </li></ul>
  58. 58. Slide Left Blank
  59. 59. Roy Glauber Jr. got the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2005, for quantum optics.
  60. 60. <ul><li>10. This theory is based on the idea that the biomass self-regulates the conditions on the planet to make its physical environment (in particular temperature and chemistry of the atmosphere) on the planet more hospitable to the species which constitute its &quot;life&quot;. The hypothesis properly defined this &quot;hospitality&quot; as a full homeostasis. A model that is often used to illustrate the original hypothesis is the so-called Daisyworld simulation. What hypothesis are we talking about? </li></ul>
  61. 61. Slide Left Blank
  62. 62. Gaia Hypothesis
  63. 63. <ul><li>11. * The satirical newspaper The Onion published an article entitled &quot;I, X&quot; as a pun on Asimov's I, Robot, in which an anthropomorphic X gives a speech parodying much of the angst experienced by robots in Asimov's fiction, including a statement of the &quot;Three Laws of X&quot;: </li></ul><ul><li>1. A X may not immerse a human being or, through lack of flotation, allow a human to come to harm. </li></ul><ul><li>2. A X must obey all commands and steering input given by its human X, except where such input would conflict with the First Law. </li></ul><ul><li>3. A X must preserve its own flotation as long as such preservation does not conflict with the First or Second Law. </li></ul><ul><li>X please. </li></ul>
  64. 64. Slide Left Blank
  65. 66. <ul><li>12. * Before World War I, X worked at the University of Karlsruhe, where he and Carl Y developed the X Process between 1894 and 1911. He received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work in 1918. </li></ul><ul><li>During World War I, X came up with X’s rule, regarding chemical weapons: “For a given poisonous gas, C = t*k where C is the concentration of the gas (mass per unit volume), t is the amount of time necessary to breathe the gas, in order to produce a given toxic effect, and k is a constant, depending on both the gas and the effect. </li></ul><ul><li>X’s wife committed suicide, after she oversaw the use of chemical weapons at Ypres. X developed the Z – X Cycle along with fellow German scientist Max Z. </li></ul><ul><li>All we want is X. Yaaru? </li></ul>
  66. 67. Slide Left Blank
  67. 68. Fritz Haber <ul><li>Y = Bosch </li></ul><ul><li>Z = Born </li></ul>
  68. 69. <ul><li>13. X and Y were able to transmute elements, creating nitrogen from boron, phosphorous from aluminum and silicon from magnesium. These won them the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1935. Id X and Y (order interchangeable). </li></ul>
  69. 70. Slide Left Blank
  70. 71. Frederic and Irene Joliot-Curie
  71. 72. <ul><li>14. Arthur Sasse wanted to get X smiling on his birthday. X was tired, and so, in order to get rid of the photographer, X did something which Sasse took a picture of. On June 19, 2009, the photograph was auctioned at a record $74,324, the most for any picture of X. Id X and say what he did. </li></ul>
  72. 73. Slide Left Blank
  73. 74. Albert Einstein
  74. 75. <ul><li>15. * X is a game that demonstrates the futility of war according to the following conditions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Both players play optimally, and one player always moves first. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In war, both players have units of equal strength. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All units are exactly equal, and differences between them are only in how they look. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Also, the number of nodes of the game tree decrease after every move. </li></ul><ul><li>Theorem: It is impossible to design an artificial intelligence to win every game of X. </li></ul><ul><li>Id the game X. </li></ul>
  75. 76. Slide Left Blank
  76. 78. <ul><li>16. * X's On The Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Substances marks the beginning of chemical thermodynamics by integrating chemical, physical, electrical, and electromagnetic phenomena into a coherent system. It introduced concepts such as chemical potential, phase rule, and others, which form the basis for modern physical chemistry. Popular American writer Bill Bryson describes X's paper as &quot;the Principia of thermodynamics&quot;. Whose paper? </li></ul>
  77. 79. Slide Left Blank
  78. 81. <ul><li>17. X, born on 10 March 1957, in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala is an Indian theoretical physicist. He is currently Distinguished Professor at the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, (IUCAA) at Pune, India. His principal fields of research are Cosmology and the interface between Gravity and Quantum theory. X has received several national and international awards including the Birla Science Prize (1991), the Millennium Medal, Al-Khwarizmi International Award, Sackler Distinguished Astronomer, Miegunah Fellowship Award and the G.D. Birla Award for Scientific Research. His work has won awards from the Gravity Research Foundation, USA five times, in 1984, 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008. He is an elected Fellow of the three National Academies of Science in India. Some of his research papers have been rated as the ‘most influential paper of the year’. He has also been awarded the Padma Shri by the Government of India in the year 2007. ID X. </li></ul>
  79. 82. Slide Left Blank
  80. 83. T. Padmanabhan
  81. 84. <ul><li>18. Charles H. Duell resigned from his post in 1899. Although most of us may not remember him, we know the reason he gave for his resignation. The reason was dependant on the job that he did before resigning. What was the reason he gave (which is now quoted widely)? </li></ul>
  82. 85. Slide Left Blank
  83. 86. &quot;Everything that can be invented has been invented.&quot; <ul><li>He was the Commissioner of the U.S. Patent Office in 1899. </li></ul>
  84. 87. <ul><li>19. In 1872, Leland Stanford, had taken a position on a popularly-debated question of the day. He decided to prove that he was right scientifically. Using a series of photographs, Eadward Muybridge proved Stanford correct. What was the question? Also explain what resulted from Muybridge’s experiment, which has substantial significance in the film world. </li></ul>
  85. 88. Slide Left Blank
  86. 89. &quot;Do all four of a horse's hooves left the ground at the same time during a gallop?&quot; <ul><li><go to next slide for result> </li></ul>
  87. 90. First moving pictures / movie
  88. 91. <ul><li>20. * One can imagine that the X was created by starting with a line segment, then recursively altering each line segment as follows: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Divide the line segment into three segments of equal length. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Draw an equilateral triangle that has the middle segment from step 1 as its base and points outward. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Remove the line segment that is the base of the triangle from step 2. </li></ul><ul><li>ID the fractal. </li></ul>
  89. 92. Slide Left Blank
  90. 93. Koch Snowflake / Koch Star
  91. 94. 21. Debate discussion funda. <ul><li>Date: 30 June, 1860 </li></ul><ul><li>Place: Oxford University Museum </li></ul><ul><li>Chairman: John Henslow </li></ul><ul><li>Participants: John William Draper, Thomas Henry Huxley, Bishop Samuel Wilberforce, Benjamin Brodie, Joseph Dalton Hooker and Robert FitzRoy. </li></ul>
  92. 95. Slide Left Blank
  93. 96. &quot;On the Intellectual Development of Europe, considered with reference to the views of Mr. Darwin and others, that the progression of organisms is determined by law&quot;. <ul><li>The debate was the 1860 Oxford Evolution Debate. </li></ul><ul><li>Wilberforce: Huxley. Was it through your grandfather or your grandmother that you claim your descent from a monkey. </li></ul><ul><li>Huxley: I would not be ashamed to have a monkey for an ancestor. But I would be ashamed to be connected with a man who used his great gifts to obscure the truth. </li></ul>
  94. 97. 22. * Tribute to what? <ul><li><play A.avi> </li></ul>
  95. 98. Slide Left Blank
  96. 99. Prince Of Persia
  97. 100. <ul><li>23. Id the concept which this Star Trek episode introduced into the franchise & popular culture? </li></ul>
  98. 101. Slide Left Blank
  99. 102. Alternate Reality / Parallel Universe / Mirror Universe <ul><li>Spock has a beard and moustache in the Star Trek mirror universe.  </li></ul>
  100. 103. 24. Whose currency?
  101. 104. Slide Left Blank
  102. 106. 25. After whom are the L-points named?
  103. 107. Slide Left Blank
  104. 108. Joseph Lagrange
  105. 109. 26. * Whose death did Franklin and Gosling announce on 18 th July 1952?
  106. 110. Slide Left Blank
  107. 112. 27. Id BOTH missing people
  108. 113. Slide Left Blank
  109. 114. Crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia
  110. 115. Finals will be tomorrow at 9:00 a.m.
  111. 116. Finals
  112. 117. Before Starting…
  113. 118. Honorable Mentions <ul><li>Sheki and Co. = 5.5 </li></ul><ul><li>SMDCET, Dharwad = 5.5 </li></ul>
  114. 119. Format <ul><li>WB </li></ul><ul><li>WB </li></ul><ul><li>MIB </li></ul><ul><li>MIB </li></ul><ul><li>LVC </li></ul>
  115. 120. Round I Write Bros.
  116. 121. Rules <ul><li>5 questions on pseudo-sciences. </li></ul><ul><li>+10 for every correct answer. </li></ul><ul><li>+20 for ALL correct answers. </li></ul>
  117. 122. <ul><li>1. In 1667, Johann Joachim Becher published his Physical Education, which was the first mention of what would become the X theory. Traditionally, early scientists considered that there were four classical elements: fire, water, air, and earth. In his book, Becher eliminated fire and air from the classical element model and replaced them with three forms of earth: terra lapidea, terra fluida, and terra pinguis. Terra pinguis was the element which imparted oily, sulphurous, or combustible properties. Becher believed that terra pinguis was a key feature of combustion and was released when combustible substances were burned. X please. </li></ul>
  118. 123. <ul><li>2. X is a hypothesis stating that the personality traits of a person can be derived from the shape of the skull. Developed by German physician Franz Joseph Gall in 1796, the discipline was very popular in the 19th century. In 1843, François Magendie, the influential French psychologist based a lot of his research on this theory. X-ological thinking was very influential in 19th-century psychiatry and modern neuroscience. X? </li></ul>
  119. 124. <ul><li>3. This theory, expounded as natural history by Aristotle, was accepted throughout Antiquity and revived with the rediscovery of Aristotle in the Middle Ages. Both Schopenhauer and Herbert Spencer found the theory to be a credible one; it added to modern understanding of genetics. This concept of impregnation was expressed in Greek mythology in the origins of Greek heroes and explained their superhuman powers. Give me the name of the theory or funda. </li></ul>
  120. 125. <ul><li>4. The word in Homeric Greek means &quot;pure, fresh air&quot; or &quot;clear sky&quot;, imagined in Greek mythology to be the pure essence where the gods lived and which they breathed, analogous to the air breathed by mortals. It corresponds to the concept of Akasha in Hindu philosophy and is linked to Brihaspati (or the planet Jupiter) and the center direction of the compass. This word and the concept it stood for was very influential in the Greek (and hence the whole) scientific world. What word? </li></ul>
  121. 126. <ul><li>5. X is both a philosophy and a practice with an aim of achieving ultimate wisdom as well as immortality, involving the improvement of the Xist as well as the making of several substances described as possessing unusual properties. The practical aspect of X generated the basics of modern inorganic chemistry, namely concerning procedures, equipment and the identification and use of many current substances. X please. </li></ul>
  122. 127. Slide Left Blank
  123. 128. Exchange
  124. 129. Answers <ul><li>Phlogiston </li></ul><ul><li>Phrenology </li></ul><ul><li>Telegony </li></ul><ul><li>Ether </li></ul><ul><li>Alchemy </li></ul>
  125. 130. Round II Write Bros.
  126. 131. Rules <ul><li>Id what the comic is parodying / what has been blanked out in each comic. </li></ul><ul><li>+5 for every correct answer. </li></ul><ul><li>+15 for ALL correct answers. </li></ul>
  127. 137. Slide Left Blank
  128. 138. Exchange
  129. 139. Answers
  130. 145. Round III M.I.B.
  131. 146. <ul><li>1. The man shown here won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1937, for proving de Broglie’s hypothesis. His results, however, contradicted his more famous father’s work. Id the father. </li></ul>
  132. 147. Slide Left Blank
  133. 148. Sir J.J. Thomson
  134. 149. 2. Basis for most block ciphers. Id.
  135. 150. Slide Left Blank
  136. 152. 3. Who?
  137. 153. Slide Left Blank
  138. 155. 4. Id BOTH authors of the paper. / Connect the man and the movie.
  139. 157. Slide Left Blank
  140. 158. Daniel Kleitman has the lowest Erdos-Bacon number (1+2 = 3)
  141. 159. 5. Principles to design what? <ul><li>Letters should be typed by alternating between hands. </li></ul><ul><li>For maximum speed and efficiency, the most common letters and digraphs should be the easiest to type. </li></ul><ul><li>The least common letters should be on the bottom row. </li></ul><ul><li>The right hand should do more of the ______, because most people are right-handed. </li></ul><ul><li>Digraphs should not be typed with adjacent fingers. </li></ul><ul><li>Stroking should generally move from the edges of the board to the middle. </li></ul>
  142. 160. Slide Left Blank
  143. 161. Dvorak Simplified Keyboard
  144. 162. 6. Who?
  145. 163. Slide Left Blank
  146. 164. Terrence Stanley Fox
  147. 165. 7. Who is the other writer?
  148. 166. Slide Left Blank
  149. 168. 8. Id the author AND the book.
  150. 169. Slide Left Blank
  151. 171. 9. Funda.
  152. 172. Slide Left Blank
  153. 174. 10. What is the NAME on the record?
  154. 175. Slide Left Blank
  155. 177. 11. What is at the Convergence?
  156. 178. Slide Left Blank
  157. 179. Great Pacific Garbage Patch
  158. 180. 12. Engraving by Karl Gottlieb von Windisch of an invention by Wolfgang von Kempelen. Id the invention.
  159. 181. Slide Left Blank
  160. 182. The Turk
  161. 183. 13. Gaspar Schott sketch of Otto von Guericke’s experiment. Id experiment.
  162. 184. Slide Left Blank
  163. 185. Magdeburg Hemispheres Experiment
  164. 186. 14. Connect.
  165. 187. Slide Left Blank
  166. 188. People who were forced to reject the Nobel Prize because of their Governments <ul><li>Richard Kuhn – won the 1938 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, but refused because the Nazis banned Germans from accepting the Prize. </li></ul><ul><li>Gerhard Domagk – won the 1939 Nobel Prize for Medicine, but refused for the same reason. </li></ul><ul><li>Adolf Butenandt – won the 1939 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, but refused for the same reason. </li></ul><ul><li>Boris Pasternak – won the 1958 Nobel Prize for Literature, but refused because of pressure from the Communist Government in the U.S.S.R. </li></ul>
  167. 189. 15. Stamp in honour of who? / What?
  168. 190. Slide Left Blank
  169. 191. Chandrasekhar Limit
  170. 192. 16. Two pairs. Who connects? How?
  171. 193. Slide Left Blank
  172. 195. 17. What did Willard Libby do?
  173. 196. Slide Left Blank
  174. 197. Radio-Carbon Dating
  175. 198. 18. Who?
  176. 199. Slide Left Blank
  177. 201. 19. Who?
  178. 202. Slide Left Blank
  179. 204. 20. After whom is the phenomenon named? / Id the phenomenon.
  180. 205. Slide Left Blank
  181. 206. Zeeman Effect, after Pieter Zeeman
  182. 207. 21. Map of a computer game called Hic Sunt Dracones. This map is reminiscent of something that cartographers used to do earlier. What did the cartographers do while making maps that is reflected in this one?
  183. 208. Slide Left Blank
  184. 209. Here Be Dragons <ul><li>Unexplored, and sometimes dangerous areas of the map had to be filled in by something. At the time, one of the most dangerous mythical creatures were dragons. Hence, cartographers wrote ‘Hic Sunt Dracones’, or ‘Here Be Dragons’ in the maps, to indicate uncertainty or danger in the areas so marked. </li></ul>
  185. 210. 22. What did he discover? / What word did he coin to describe his discovery?
  186. 211. Slide Left Blank
  187. 212. The word ‘antibiotic’
  188. 213. <ul><li>23. The stamp issued in 2008 by the U.S. Post Office has a mistake. The error was that the bond to the phosphate group should go to the first O and not the second, the molecule in question being the X ester, the result of the X Cycle. (contd.) Id X. </li></ul>
  189. 215. Slide Left Blank
  190. 217. 24. Id the compound, whose most famous use was discovered by the man in the stamp, that became infamous after the publication of the book Silent Spring , by Rachel Carson. Also, id the man.
  191. 218. Slide Left Blank
  192. 219. <ul><li>Compound is DDT. </li></ul><ul><li>Trivial name is d ichloro d iphenyl t richloroethane. </li></ul><ul><li>IUPAC name is 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-di(4-chlorophenyl)ethane. </li></ul>
  193. 220. <ul><li>25. The first Z was held in 1911. During the fifth Z in 1927, the topic being Electrons and Protons , the following debate took place regarding Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle: </li></ul><ul><li>X: &quot;___ ____ ___ ____ ____.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Y: &quot;X, stop telling ___ what to do.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Id X, Y and give the quote. </li></ul>
  194. 221. Slide Left Blank
  195. 222. Einstein: God does not play dice. Bohr: Einstein, stop telling God what to do.
  196. 223. <ul><li>26. Niels Bohr has had the honor of influencing the naming of two different elements. One is element # 107 Bh, or bohrium. The other is an element discovered by Georg von Hevesy, and named after his hometown of Copenhagen. Id the other element. </li></ul>
  197. 224. Slide Left Blank
  198. 225. Hafnium (from Hafnia)
  199. 226. 27. Id person and phenomenon.
  200. 227. Slide Left Blank
  201. 228. Heike Kammerlingh Onnes <ul><li>The graph describes the phenomenon of superconductivity. </li></ul>
  202. 229. 28. Id the experiment. The other picture shows the person who did it, as well as how it looked.
  203. 230. Slide Left Blank
  204. 231. Miller-Urey Experiment <ul><li>Urey speculated that the early atmosphere was probably composed of ammonia, methane and hydrogen; one of his Chicago graduate students, Stanley L. Miller showed that, if such a mixture be exposed to ultraviolet radiation and to water, it can interact to produce amino acids, commonly called the “building blocks of life”. The experiment that simulated hypothetical conditions thought at the time to be present on the early Earth, and tested for the occurrence of chemical evolution. Specifically, the experiment tested Soviet scientist Alexander Oparin's and J. B. S. Haldane's hypothesis that conditions on the primitive Earth favored chemical reactions that synthesized organic compounds from inorganic precursors. </li></ul><ul><li>The man in the picture is Harold Urey. </li></ul>
  205. 232. 29. What Hewish & Ryle discovered and what they used to do it. Funda. <ul><li>They won the Nobel Prize in 1974. </li></ul>
  206. 233. Slide Left Blank
  207. 234. The discovery of pulsars using radio-telescopes.
  208. 235. 30. Connect. <ul><li>“ By shortening the labors, the invention of __________ doubled the life of the astronomer.” – Pierre Simon Laplace. </li></ul>
  209. 236. Slide Left Blank
  210. 237. John Napier <ul><li>“ By shortening the labors, the invention of logarithms doubled the life of the astronomer.” – Pierre Simon Laplace. </li></ul><ul><li>The invention is Napier’s Bones </li></ul>
  211. 238. 31. X (shown on the stamp) used to call his mentor Y “The Crocodile”, prompting the sculpture shown. Id X / Y.
  212. 239. Slide Left Blank
  213. 240. <ul><li>X = Pyotr Kapitsa </li></ul><ul><li>Y = Ernest Rutherford </li></ul>
  214. 241. <ul><li>32. Video called Me At The Zoo , made by who? / Id the guy. </li></ul>
  215. 242. Slide Left Blank
  216. 243. Jawed Karim <ul><li>Founder of YouTube along with Chad Hurley and Steve Chen. </li></ul>
  217. 244. <ul><li>33. X worked on the manufacture of phosgene and the detection of mustard gas for France during World War I. However, X is most noted for devising a new method for generating carbon-carbon bonds using magnesium to couple ketones and alkyl halides. The reaction is an important means of preparing organic compounds from smaller precursor molecules, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1912 with fellow Frenchman Paul Sabatier. Id X. </li></ul>
  218. 245. Slide Left Blank
  219. 247. <ul><li>34. X was the first inorganic chemist who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry (in 1913) and the only one till 1973. He won it for his work in proposing the structure of a certain class of compounds. Id X. </li></ul>
  220. 248. Slide Left Blank
  221. 250. <ul><li>35. Irving Langmuir worked at General Electric from 1909 to 1950. He was the first industrial chemist who won a Nobel Prize &quot;for his discoveries and investigations in surface chemistry.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>However, he is most famous for improving one of the inventions of GE’s founder. What invention? / How? </li></ul>
  222. 251. Slide Left Blank
  223. 252. Light-bulb <ul><li>He discovered that the lifetime of a tungsten filament was lengthened by filling the bulb with an inert gas, such as argon. He also discovered that twisting the filament into a tight coil improved its efficiency. </li></ul>
  224. 253. LVC
  225. 254. Rules <ul><li>20 visuals connected by a Theme. </li></ul><ul><li>Points for getting the theme right / wrong will be shown on each slide. </li></ul>
  226. 255. +50 / -25
  227. 256. +45 / -22
  228. 257. +40 / -20
  229. 258. +35 / -17
  230. 259. +30 / -15
  231. 260. +25 / -12
  232. 261. +20 / -10
  233. 262. +15 / -7
  234. 263. +10 / -5
  235. 264. +5 / last guess
  236. 265. Slide Left Blank
  237. 266. MOONS Wanna know how? Use tineye.com to find out Work it out!
  238. 267. Credits <ul><li>Quiz-masters: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sandeep Albert Mathias </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kaustubh Thirumalai </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Special Mention: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mr. Arun Hiregange, whose notes were very useful in the making of this quiz. </li></ul></ul>
  239. 268. End Of Quiz! Scores

×