Information literacy projects around the world - Empatic Information Competences

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An assignmnet presented for the Information Literacy unit part of my DLIS (Diploma in Library and Information Studies).

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Information literacy projects around the world - Empatic Information Competences

  1. 1. LIS 1321 – Information Literacy and Reference Sources Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world -EMPATIC- Luke Brincat (537588M)
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Introduction................................................................................................................................................................3 1.1 What is EMPATIC? ...............................................................................................................................................3 1.2 What is Information Literacy? .............................................................................................................................3 1.3 Any Developments in the IL Field? ......................................................................................................................3 2 It’s all about EMPATIC.................................................................................................................................................4 2.1 Why I chose EMPATIC?........................................................................................................................................4 2.2 What Does EMPATIC aim to achieve? .................................................................................................................5 2.3 How will EMPATIC work?.....................................................................................................................................5 3 EMPATIC’s Objectives.................................................................................................................................................6 3.1 Analyse what has been done...............................................................................................................................6 3.2 Education is the Key.............................................................................................................................................7 3.3 Raising awareness................................................................................................................................................8 3.4 Getting recommendations...................................................................................................................................8 3.5 Final Conference..................................................................................................................................................9 3.6 Web Interface......................................................................................................................................................9 4 Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................................10 4.1 Overall opinion ..................................................................................................................................................10 Bibliography.................................................................................................................................................................11 Appendices ..................................................................................................................................................................12
  3. 3. Luke Bricnat Pg 3 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 WHAT IS EMPATIC? The EMPATIC project is funded under the EU Lifelong Learning Programme with support from the European Commission. EMPATIC stands for Empowering Autonomous Learning Through Information Competencies. The objective of this projects stands to provide people with the right tools to help them get the correct information they need. It empowers autonomous learning, hence it facilitates self-access learning through information competencies. Information competency has evolved through recent evident changes in technology, and people today are faced with mounds of information everyday. Similar projects will promote new and better ways for people to get the right information. According to a study conducted by OCLC (Online Computer Library Centre) in 2005, a majority of students believe they can accomplish all their research online using Google and Wikipedia, and are overlooking good resources such as online magazines, databases and library resources. However, although usage of many of the library electronic resources is relatively low, most college students are aware of library electronic resources. This shows us that in today’s knowledge-based society, one can easily get lost whenever he/she starts that journey to find the right information. This is because there are plenty of paths one can take, however, not all are reliable Therefore, people need guidance. People need Information Literacy! 1.2 WHAT IS INFORMATION LITERACY? The ALA (American Libraries Association (date)) States “To be information literate, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate and effectively use the needed information” information literacy is the foundation of lifelong learning. It empowers users with the necessary skills to acquire information and learn autonomously and assume greater control of their own learning. Information literacy is applicable to all learning environments, and to all levels of education. 1.3 ANY DEVELOPMENTS IN THE IL FIELD? In Europe, Information literacy is unappreciated, it’s role is undervalued, and it has been often misunderstood for Digital Literacy or Digital Competence. This can be seen in a document published in 2007 by the European Commission entitled Key competences for lifelong learning. In this publication in the section entitled Digital competence , it states under Digital Competence skills, “the ability to search, collect and process information and use it in a critical and systematic way...” nowhere is information literacy mentioned. This is just a misinterpretation of the name; the need of information and right skills on how to get it has always existed.
  4. 4. Luke Bricnat Pg 4 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC In 1974, The Intergovernmental Conference on the Planning of National Documentation, Library and Archives Infrastructures was convened by UNESCO in cooperation with the International Federation for Documentation, the International Federation of Library Associations and the International Council of Archives. This conference unanimously accepted the concept and objectives of the national documentation, library and archives information system (NATIS). The NATIS implied that the government should maximize the availability of all relevant information through documentation, library and archive services, for the benefit of the basic education, primary and secondary levels of its citizens, within a flexible framework. In 1989 the ALA’s Definition of Information Literacy had a great influence on higher education sector; also the National Forum on Information Literacy was established. The Influence of Information Literacy slowly started growing and by 1999 the association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) formulated the Information Literacy Standards for Higher education. When the Australian and New Zealand Institute for Information Literacy released its’second edition of the Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy Framework in 2004, it emphasises upon the importance of information literacy, particularly in higher education. It states “generic graduate attributes in Australia have come to be accepted as the, knowledge skills and abilities of university graduates, beyond disciplinary knowledge, which are applicable to a range of contexts. It’ purpose is for university students to help them acquire these qualities as one of the outcomes of successful completion of any undergraduate degree at university.” When we focus on the Euro zone one cannot fail to mention the European Network on Information Literacy (EnIL) which is a research initiative of the Institute for Studies on Scientific Research and Documentation (Isrds), that started in 2001. EnIL’s research agenda was the development of a system for the assessment and certification of information skills of higher education students in Europe. 2 IT’S ALL ABOUT EMPATIC 2.1 WHY I CHOSE EMPATIC? I chose EMPATIC as basis for this paper, for the simple reason that this initiative draws together and valorises results of previous information literacy initiatives across the school, university, adult and vocational learning. In few words this project’s mission is to mainstream information literacy at the national and European Union levels, it also encourages and gives guidelines for future information literacy initiatives. This project envisions its citizens, business, government, societies in Europe grasping and making use of basic IL competencies.
  5. 5. Luke Bricnat Pg 5 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC 2.2 WHAT DOES EMPATIC AIM TO ACHIEVE? EMPATIC improves current perceptions among policy makers in Europe, stating that “Information Literacy is a vital component of the future development of a people-centred, inclusive and development-oriented European Information Society. A society in which everyone can create, access, utilize and share information and knowledge enabling individuals, communities and peoples to achieve their full potential in promoting their sustainable development and improving their quality of life”. This project is funded by the European Commission and is focused on promoting the creation of a framework for Lifelong Learning. Also it studies previous frameworks, and related programmes in the Information Literacy area, promotes the use of Information Literacy amongst our society. Such a project, which had no specific or small target audience, but rather aimed to diffuse these competencies with the general public resembles the “UNESCO Information for all Programme” 2.3 HOW WILL EMPATIC WORK? The programme has been constructed to ensure that over the course of its 2 year duration, it attempts to achieve its aims, objectives and produces the deliverables and outputs on time. Here is a list of the major objectives: ● A report on the current state practices in IL: this report is to analyse over 87 IL programmes in the four educational sectors which the EU and other bodies have supported in this area between 1994 and 2010. ● A strategic review of information literacy: the aim here is to define a conceptual, generic and tentative framework for information literacy ● Reports from four separate workshops involving policy makers and other stakeholders to discuss and define major issues according to each of the sectors. ● Promotional resources to support the dissemination strategy of the project for the inclusion of information literacy at each educational level. ● A series of recommendations to policy makers and politicians to stimulate action and the emulation of good practice at national level. ● A final conference which would present the final case studies and promotional materials which will be presented and discussed. ● An interactive web environment presenting the project and its information in an attractive and structured way.
  6. 6. Luke Bricnat Pg 6 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC 3 EMPATIC’S OBJECTIVES 3.1 ANALYSE WHAT HAS BEEN DONE Throughout recent years there have been many Information Literacy related projects. EMPATIC analysed 87 of these initiatives (See Appendix A for the List), such work was done with the support of EnIL (European network on Information Literacy) to collect and inform professionals about initiatives in this area. The graph below represents the IL initiatives by year of launch. The proposal analyses information literacy from three aspects: ● Disciplinary: Impact of IL as a form of study in education to instil and enhance the culture of information. ● Social / Political : Impact of IL as an educational policy ● Cognitive: Impact of IL as a personal competence to teach IL skills
  7. 7. Luke Bricnat Pg 7 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC EMPATIC categorise Information Literacy in three levels ● Basic ○ fundamental concepts: value of information a general picture of the Information universe ○ basic information mapping, Information Retrieval basics, minimum set of evaluation criteria ● Advanced ○ Basic IL competencies ○ Analysis of information sources ○ The logic of the information retrieval process ○ Semantic representation of documents (basic concepts) ○ Scientific writing ● Specialised ○ Advanced IL competencies ○ Disciplinary information mapping ○ specific search tools ○ Disciplinary writing 3.2 EDUCATION IS THE KEY EMPATIC strives for changes in the current educational system with particular focus on Higher Education institutions. EMPATIC has promoted IL among academics and policy makers across Europe to raise awareness of both the need of IL and the difference between IL and computer Literacy. A detailed information strategy in European countries is needed; however the information culture is different from one EU country to the other, so what works in one part of Europe may not work in the other. It has been mentioned that the central drive for IL is directed to local communities to keep IL within a local level. In the School sector, for example, librarians and information professionals must cooperate with people in the educational process such as headmasters, teachers, parents, students and other people having social functions in their local communities If we take a look to higher education, developing lifelong learning is central. However the major challenges in this sector are curricular reform, the recognition of informal learning. Some questions may arise when discussing IL as part of the curriculum, is Information Literacy a discipline of study? Can Information Literacy be inserted into university curricula, like for example Computer science? Knowledge and skills learnt does not stop at school, but are transferable to our everyday life. Information Literacy may improve productivity and efficiency in work, empowers personal and institutional development. The challenges in promoting IL in vocational education and lifelong learning are substantial, however, mostly are due to lack of awareness and recognition.
  8. 8. Luke Bricnat Pg 8 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC 3.3 RAISING AWARENESS The two examples of promotion for the project , were the publishing of articles on IL in Peer reviewed articles and participating in international conferences. Each project team member had to write articles related to EMPATHIC and Information Literacy and publish them in professional/scholarly journals in different languages. Further more , the project members had to take part in appropriate national and international conferences speaking about EMPATHIC related matters. These included: ● QQML4 in Limerick, Ireland, May 2012 ● The Road to information Literacy: Librarians as facilitators of learning, IFLA Satellite meeting in Tampere, Finland, August 8, 9, 19, 2012 ● World Congress on Libraries and Information (WLIC), 14-18th August 2012, Helsinki ● Media & Learning Conference 2012, 14-15 November, Brussels ● Meeting with UNESCO and IFLA, 14 August 2012 Apart from the meetings EMPATIC will provide a forum for discussion and for advice to decision makers, committees, or other executive boards. Project members are to assist practitioners in developing policies and practices to stimulate further the development of policy and strategic thinking, while providing communication between IL Interests and professional groups. 3.4 GETTING RECOMMENDATIONS Another deliverable EMPATIC strived to achieve were recommendations by major Information professionals to policy makers in Europe to stimulate action, by demonstrating the power of Information Literacy. The European Union tries to ensure that initial education and training help young people develop key competences to help them through adulthood and working life. They also try to ensure that adults develop and update key competences throughout their lives. From the recommendations forwared (Refer to APPENDIX B) we can see that IFLA gave advice on how to design and establish an Information Literacy program by identifying what is required, setting goals and by involving all relevant parties in the planning process (librarians, teachers, administrators …). The UNESCO recommended to promote and widen access to information in the public domain through the organization, digitization and preservation of information. Support education in the fields of information and informatics and promote information and knowledge networking at local, national, regional and international levels. EMPATHIC formulated recommendations for the four sectors in education, giving pointers and specific insight on how Information can be implemented. Below are some points which are worth mentioning (for the full recommendations see APPENDIX B)
  9. 9. Luke Bricnat Pg 9 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC School Learning Sector: ● Implementation is IL standards are to be flexible and adapted to the nation. ● cooperation between ministries of education, departments of library and information science, and educational institutions ● National and general central bodies are appropriate to set goals, however the cooperative work is within local communities and all other interested parties. ● The importance of IL in School libraries must be shown. Higher Education ● The Inclusion of IL into the Bologna process as a new learning outcome ● IL must be implemented within higher education curricular courses. ● Infuse IL within European University curricular at three different levels where suggested ○ Library delivered (2-4 credits) ○ Academic delivered (4 credits) ○ Embedded (credits included within the subject) Vocational Education and Training Sector and Adult Learning Sector ● Increase awareness for society within work culture ● Integrated within Lifelong Learning Programs and other activities arranged by municipalities, and ministries ● Courses organized with cooperation of public libraries to provide people with competence in IL ● Distance education possibilities for IL 3.5 FINAL CONFERENCE EMPATIC hosted two events, the first one was the “Literacy and Society, Culture, Media & Education” which was hosted by Ghent University, Belgium in 9th - 11th February 2012. The second was the final conference which was held in conjunction with EMMILE (European Meeting on Media and Information Literacy) in Milan, Italy between the 27th till 29th February. This was a three day joint conference, in which EMPATIC was represented. . Participants showed interest in EMPATIC and what it is willing to achieve. 3.6 WEB INTERFACE The last deliverable was that of a web environment, providing data about EMPATIC and helping Information professionals to improve the current state of Information Literacy culture, and to stimulate action amongst policy makers across Europe. The EMPATHIC Website contains valuable information in reports, findings and strategies to help anyone design and perfect an Information Literacy Program for his or her community. EMPATIC does not believe that the information Literacy culture can be imposed by a central European body, but thaught within small communities / institutions across Europe, and gradually paves its way into our daily lives.
  10. 10. Luke Bricnat Pg 10 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC 4 CONCLUSION 4.1 OVERALL OPINION To sum up what has been discussed above, EMPATIC has proven to others and myself to have been a great programme which gathered, studied and analysed what has been done before. It helped us understand further what went wrong and where we did just right. It will surely help anyone who is willing to take up a challenge and start working on designing a framework for Information Literacy to diffuse in his or her community / institution (or even nation). One must surely consider EMPATIC to be a great resource of information where one can meet other people in the IL field who are willing to assist in this great endeavour or raising, promoting and providing Information Literacy competences to the people.
  11. 11. Luke Bricnat Pg 11 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC BIBLIOGRAPHY (2013). Retrieved November 13, 2013, from EnIL - European Network on Information Literacy: http://enil.ceris.cnr.it/Basili/EnIL/ Basili, C. (2011, February). Report on Current State and Best Practices in Information Literacy. EMPATIC. Brundy, A. (2004). Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy Framework. Retrieved November 13, 2013, from University of South Australia Library: http://www.library.unisa.edu.au/Learn/infolit/infolit-2nd- edition.pdf Cisek, S. (n.d.). Exploitation Strategy. EMPATIC. EMPATIC - Empowering Autonomous Learning Through Information Competencies. (2010). Retrieved November 1, 2013, from EMPATIC Information Competencies: http://empatic.ceris.cnr.it/ EMPATIC - Information Literacy in the Adult Education/Lifelong Learning Sector - Recommendations to Policy Makers (the GRUNDTVIG programme area). (n.d.). Retrieved November 6, 2013, from EMMILLE in libraries (and beyond) - European Meeting on Media and Information Literacy Education: http://emmile.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/empatic_il_adult-education-sector-recommendations.pdf EMPATIC Information Literacy in the adult education/lifelong learning sector. (n.d.). Retrieved November 6, 2013, from EMMILLE in libraries (and beyond) - European Meeting on Media and Information Literacy Education: http://emmile.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/empatic_il_adult-education-sector_one- pager.pdf EMPATIC News No 4: October - December 2011. (2011). Retrieved November 13, 2013, from EMPATIC Information Competencies: http://empatic.ceris.cnr.it/eng/Newsletter/EMPATIC-News-No-42 EMPATIC Workshops. (2012). Retrieved November 6, 2013, from EMMILLE in libraries (and beyond) - European Meeting on Media and Information Literacy Education: http://emmile.wordpress.com/empatic- workshops/ Finalized EMPATIC Recommendations to Policy Makers. (n.d.). Retrieved November 7, 2013, from EMPATIC Information Comprtencies: http://empatic.ceris.cnr.it/eng/News/Finalized-EMPATIC-Recommendations- to-Policy-Makers Forest Woody Horton, J. (2013). Overview of Information Literacy Resources Worldwide. Paris: UNESCO. Head, A. J., & Eisenberg, M. B. (2009, December 1). Lessons Learned: How College Students Seek Information in the Digital Age. Retrieved November 14, 2013, from Project Information Literacy - A large-scale study about early adults and their research habits: http://projectinfolit.org/pdfs/PIL_Fall2009_finalv_YR1_12_2009v2.pdf Information Competency for Faculty at Rio Hondo College. (2013). Retrieved November 12, 2013, from Rio Hondo College Library: http://library.riohondo.edu/Info_Comp/WhatIsInfoComp.htm
  12. 12. Luke Bricnat Pg 12 LIS 1321 Assignment 1: Information Literacy Projects around the world – EMPATIC Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. (2013). Retrieved November 13, 2013, from ACRL - Association of College & Research Libraries: http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency Key Competencies for Lifelong Learning - European Reference Framework. (2007). Retrieved November 13, 2013, from http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/education_culture/publ/pdf/ll-learning/keycomp_en.pdf Online Computer Library Center. (2006). College Students' Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources - A Report to the OCLC Membership. Retrieved November 13, 2013, from http://www.oclc.org/content/dam/oclc/reports/pdfs/studentperceptions.pdf Reports - In the section of the website you can access EMPATIC project reports. (n.d.). Retrieved November 7, 2013, from EMPATIC Information Competencies: http://empatic.ceris.cnr.it/eng/Reports UNESCO - Information for All Programme (IFAP). (n.d.). Retrieved November 13, 2013, from UNESCO Building Peace in the minds of men and women: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and- information/intergovernmental-programmes/information-for-all-programme-ifap/about-ifap/objectives/ UNESCO General Conference Eighteenth session, Paris 1974 - Report by the director general on the intergovernmental conference on the planning of national documentation, library and archives infrastructures paris, 23-27 September 1974. (1974, October 9). Retrieved November 13, 2013, from UNESCO Building Peace in the minds of men and women: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0001/000122/012238eb.pdf APPENDICES Appendix A - Basili, C. (2011, February). Report on Current State and Best Practices in Information Literacy. EMPATIC. Pg 30 - 45 Appendix B - Cisek, S. (n.d.). Exploitation Strategy. EMPATIC. Pg. 14 - 20
  13. 13. APPENDIX A
  14. 14. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 30 of 77 The national initiatives have been derived mainly from: The European Observatory on IL Policies and Research http://www.ceris.cnr.it/Basili/EnIL/gateway/gatewayhome.htm a source produced by the CNR-Ceris within the research activities of the European network on Information Literacy. The EnIL Observatory covers a set of European countries41 , and therefore the Empatic list of best practices concentrates on the 10 countries there represented: Austria, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Spain. UK initiatives have been chosen based on their meaningfulness, while the Turkish and Polish initiatives have been identified, respectively, by Jagu and TDK Empatic partners. Besides these intrinsic project constraints, a set of representation criteria were identified in the Empatic’s desk research work package. The guiding logic was to represent each initiative through a set of attributes which will be functional to the next steps, and – more specifically – to the activities concerning the analysis of best practices and the formulation of policy recommendations. The representation criteria identified are listed and described in the figure below. 41 The European Observatory on IL Policies and Research Available: http://www.ceris.cnr.it/Basili/EnIL/gatewayhome.htm
  15. 15. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 31 of 77 Identification attributes: name of the initiative, acronym, URL, Leader institution, contacts; Country: the one of the coordinator if a multinational initiative; Leader institution typology: Government/Parliament, Ministry, National Authority/Committee, Local Authority/Committee, University, Department, Research Institution, Professional Body, International organisation, NGO Kind of initiative: policy, position & recommendations, strategy, R&D project, survey, resource(s)/tool(s) for learners/teachers/users, curriculum, promotion/support/awareness/debate/culture EU frame: COMENIUS, ERASMUS, GRUNDTVIG, LEONARDO, MINERVA, Transversal, FP3, FP4, FP7 / FP6, European Structural Funds, National, EU, International. Context or main focus: Information Literacy, Media Literacy, Digital Literacy, Information/Digital Literacy, Information/Media Literacy, Digital/Media Literacy, Science Literacy, Statistical Literacy Target community: Schools, HE, Adults, VET, mixed (the target community can be larger with respect to the LLL frame (COMENIUS, ERASMUS, GRUNDTVIG, LEONARDO); Start date : this field is not always available, but it is meaningful in order to understand how timely the leader institution realised the importance of IL. Fig. 16- representation format of IL best-practices .
  16. 16. 2.2 List of initial 87 potential initiatives for good practice selection Below are listed the 87 initiatives identified, from which 20 will be selected as good practice cases for deeper analysis in the next phases of Empatic Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) ALCE ALCE Animation for reading and comprehension at school Fundación Tomillo Capto - Centro de Actividades Pedagógicas, Spain capto@tomillo.es - Luis RUIZ DEL ÁRBOL T +34.915.61.16.03 F +34 915 63 97 84 Spain 1998 1999 COMENIUS Schools Alfin-EEES Alfin-EEES - Skills and competencies in information management for learning to learn within European Higher Education Universidad de Granada. Facultad Biblioteconomía y Documentación, Spain María Pinto Molina Tel.: 34 958 243 933 Fax: 34 958 243 490 Spain 2006 ongoing National HE CHILIAS Children in Libraries: improving multimedia virtual library access and information skills Stuttgart City Library, Germany Ingrid BUSSMANN Tel:+49-711- 2165710/5730 Fax:+49-711-2165701 Germany 1996 1998 FP4 Schools CIL CIL: basic IL tutorial of the CIB- Inter Library Centre, University Libraries System of Bologna University CIB - Inter Library Centre, University Libraries System of Alma Mater Studiorum, Bologna University Alina Renditiso Department of Education Sciences - Library Tel. 051 20 98540 Italy Latest ed 2009 National users
  17. 17. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 33 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) Compulsory schooling obligation until the age of 16 years: the new key competences Compulsory schooling obligation until the age of 16 years: the new key competences - Synthesis of the Italian Minister of Public Education's speech (Original in Italian) Ministry of Public Education, Italy Ministero della Pubblica Istruzione - Viale Trastevere, 76/A 00153 Rome Italy - Tel.: 06 5849.1 Italy 2007 ongoing National Schools DEDICATE Distance Education Information Courses through Networks Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden Nancy FJÄLLBRANT Tel:+46-31-7723754 Fax:+46-31-168494 Sweden 1997 1998 FP4 VET DELCIS Distance Education for Librarians; Creating an Information-Competent Society Vilnius University, Department of Communication, Lithuania audra.glosiene@kv.vu.lt Lithuania 2000 2002 LEONARDO VET Diliweb Diliweb - The shortest way to the Net The University of Le Havre Pierre-Yves Cachard pierre- yves.cachard@univ-lehavre.fr France 2000 ongoing International HE The DOTEINE research group The DOTEINE research group Library & Information Science Department - Carlos III University of Madrid Miguel Ángel Marzal García-Quismondo (Director) - Professor at the Library & Information Science Department of the Carlos III University of Madrid - Tel.: 91- 6249219 91-8561251 Spain 2003 ongoing National HE The DOTEINE project Documentation and information technologies for education: instruments for information literacy and the organization of educational resources Library & Information Science Department - Carlos III University of Madrid Miguel Ángel Marzal García-Quismondo (Director) - Professor at the Library & Information Science Department of the Carlos III University of Madrid - Tel.: 91- 6249219 91-8561251 Spain 2003 2006 National HE
  18. 18. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 34 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) E-learning and Integrated Education E-learning and Integrated Education Department of Education Sciences Faculty of Education Sciences, University of Padua Luciano Galliani (course director) Tel. 049/8278956 Alessandra Dal Corso (organizational secretary) Tel. 049/8278964 Italy 2004 2005 National VET E-meryt E-meryt - programme for social integration and e-inclusion of people 50+ LUTW - the Lodz Third Age University emeryt@eduplatforma.pl; Error! Hyperlink reference not valid. Poland 2009 2009 ESF Adults EDUCATE End-user courses in information access through communication technology University of Limerick, Ireland Patrick KELLY Tel:+353-61-333644 Fax:+353-61-338044 Ireland 1994 1997 FP3 HE Educational Psychology proseminars: Information Literacy Educational Psychology proseminars: Information Literacy Library of the Faculty of Psychology - Vienna Michaela Zemanek (Head) Tel.: +43(1) 4277-16830 Fax: +43(1) 4277-16839 Austria 2005 2005 National HE EEE-European methods of e- teaching and e- learning EEE-European methods of e-teaching and e- learning Zespó! Szkol nr 24 im. prof. S. Bryly, ul. Ks. Janusza 45/4 Warszawa s.bryla@wsisz.edu.pl; person: Ewa Gutowska Poland 2004 2005 COMENIUS Schools ENTITLE Europe’s New libraries Together In Transversal Learning Environments MDR Partners www.entitlelll.eu international 2008 2009 Transversal common EU Media Trainer EU Media Trainer Bürgermedienzentrum Bennohaus, Germany benno@muenster.de Germany 2003 2005 LEONARDO VET EU-Trainer for ICT- and Media competencies EU-Trainer for ICT- and Media competencies Bürgerhaus Bennohaus - Arbeitskreis Ostviertel e.V., Germany Benedikt Althoff Tel.: ++49 (0)251 609673 Fax: ++49 (0)251 6096777 - benalthoff@bennohaus.info Germany 2008 ongoing LEONARDO VET
  19. 19. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 35 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) The Evaluation of the Information Literacy of the Candidate Teachers in Primary Schools The Evaluation of the Information Literacy of the Candidate Teachers in Primary Schools Ba"aran, M. Turkey 2005 2005 National VET FORM-IT Form - it "Take part in research" Austrian Institute for Applied Ecology, Austria Marie Céline LOIBL Tel:+43-1/523610529 Fax:+43-1-5235843 Austria 2006 2008 FP7 / FP6 VET From Information Literacy to Life Long Learning II. National School Librarians' Conference: II. National School Librarians' Conference: From Information Literacy to Life Long Learning Özel Üsküdar American High School, #stanbul School Librarians' Group, Türkish Librarians' Association Turkey 2009 2009 National VET Global Imperative A Global Imperative - The Report of the 21st Century Literary Summit The New Media Consortium t 512 445-4200 f 512 445-4205; www.nmc.org International 2004 2005 International common The Google Generation The Google Generation JISC - Joint Information Systems Committee; BL - British Library ma-publishing@ucl.ac.uk United Kingdom 2007 2007 National VET Handbook for Information Literacy Teaching (HILT) Handbook for Information Literacy Teaching (HILT) Cardiff University morgannj@cardiff.ac.uk United Kingdom 2005 ongoing National VET
  20. 20. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 36 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) HERON - Adults Training on basic knowledge and skills in New Technologies HERON - Adults Training on basic knowledge and skills in New Technologies The Institute of Adult Life Long Learning (IDEKE), which belongs to the General Secretariat of Life Long Learning (GGDVM). http://www.emil-network.eu/res/ documents/resource/HERON%20-%20Adults% 20Training%20on%20Basic% 20Knowledge%20and%20Skills%20in% 20New%20Technologies.pdf Greece 2005 2008 Adults HÜBO Hacettepe Üniversity Information Literacy Program Hacettepe University - Department of Information Management - Education Faculty http://www.bby.hacettepe.edu.tr/ eng/yandaleng.asp Turkey 2010 National common I Curriculum - The Knowledge and Information Skills needed for living in the Digital Age I Curriculum - The Knowledge and Information Skills needed for living in the Digital Age Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas - Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics (IACM), Greece katerina@iacm.forth.gr Greece 2002 2004 MINERVA common ICT as a tool to activate seniors education ICT as a tool to activate seniors education and their personal development - exchanging experiences, ideas and good practices Fullness-of-Life Academy Association, Poland, Krakow biuro@apz.org.pl; tel. +48 12 294-81-35, tel./fax +48 12 294-81-36 Poland 2008 2010 GRUNDTVIG Adults ILIPG Innovative Library Initiatives Promotion Group #stanbul Technical University - Library and Documentation Branch http://www.library.itu.edu.tr/ ilipg/pt03_uyeler.html Turkey 2007 2009 National common
  21. 21. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 37 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) Improvement of the information literacy for Life Long Learning in Primary School Improvement of the information literacy for Life Long Learning in Primary School Raziye Demiralay; $irin Karadeniz raziyedemiralay@gmail.com; sirin.karadeniz@bahcesehir.edu.tr Turkey 2008 ongoing National Schools Information For All Programme - IFAP Information For All Programme - IFAP UNESCO b.radoykov@unesco.org; mc.botte@unesco.org International 2000 ongoing International common Information Literacy Information Literacy Aberdeen Business School - Robert Gordon University international@rgu.ac.uk United Kingdom ongoing National HE Information Literacy and Active Education: A Practice Model Information Literacy and Active Education: A Practice Model Serkan KOÇ; Özgün Ko"aner ozgun.kosaner@deu.edu.tr Turkey 2005 ongoing National HE Information literacy courses Information literacy courses at the Library of the Kaunas University of Technology Kaunas University of Technology. The Library Gene Duobiniene (Director) tel. 300650, tel./fax. +370-37-323590 Vanda Dovydaityte (Deputy director) tel. +370-37-300651 Lithuania 1999 2003 International HE Information Literacy Curriculum Project 2004- 2006 Information Literacy Curriculum Project 2004-2006 University of Helsinki, Finland Kaisa Sinikara - Director of Library and Information Services Development, University of Helsinki - P.O. Box 33 - FI- 00014 Finland 2004 2006 National HE Information Literacy- Educational Seminars Information Literacy- Educational Seminars University of Macedonia -Library & Information Center http://www.lib.uom.gr/index.php?lang=utf- 8 Greece 1999 ongoing National HE
  22. 22. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 38 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) Information Literacy module Information Literacy module NUI Galway, Trinity College Dublin and University College Cork Isolde Harpur, Trinity College Library Dublin Ireland ongoing National HE Information Literacy for Teachers Information Literacy for Teachers Evgenidis Foundation- Library lib@eugenfound.edu.gr Greece National VET Information Literacy Project Information literacy project Staffordshire University 3800@staffs.ac.uk United Kingdom ongoing National HE Information literacy skills Information literacy skills - the link between secondary and tertiary education Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) J.Crawford@gcal.ac.uk; christine.irving@gcal.ac.uk United Kingdom 2004 2008 National Schools Informatyka+ Informatyka+: the interregional programme for the development of the secondary school students' qualifications in Information Communication Technology Wy%sza Szko!a Informatyki (The Academy of Informatics) in Warsaw Project's office – Wy%sza Szko!a Informatyki, Lewartowskiego St. / 17 0- 169 Warsaw / Poland Poland 2008 2012 National Schools ISIC 2008 Information Seeking in Context (ISIC) 2008 Vilnius University. Faculty of Communication. Department of Information and Communication Dr. Erika Jani&nien' (contact person) tel. +370 5 2366119 Lithuania 2008 2008 International HE Learning by doing: ICT since early years Learning by doing: ICT since early years Szkola Podstawowa Nr 31, Aleja Zwyci(stwa, Dabrowa Gornicza-Zabkowice sp31_dabrowa@poczta.onet.pl, person: Miroslaw Pyplacz Poland 2005 2006 COMENIUS Schools
  23. 23. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 39 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) Learning Objects Web Learning Objects Web Aalborg University Library - Aalborg Niels Jørgen Blaabjerg, Tel.: 9635 7304 njb@aub.aau.dk Denmark 2006 ongoing National HE Library - community public information centre Library - community public information centre Lithuanian Regional Research Institute, Kaunas Antanas Alvikas (Director) Drs. Jurga Bu)ait' (Project manager) Edita Naujokaityt' (Project manager) Lithuania 2003 2004 EU VET MA in Information Literacy MA in Information Literacy University of Sheffield s.webber@sheffield.ac.uk United Kingdom 2010 ongoing National HE Medienpass (Media portfolio: blended learning course on media literacy for language teachers) Technische Universität Dresden, Lehrzentrum Sprachen und Kulturen, Germany antje.neuhoff@tu-dresden.de Germany 2006 ongoing LEONARDO VET Mile Mile - Model for information literacy education Aalborg University Library, Denmark njb@aub.auc.dk Denmark 1999 2001 National HE The multimedia school library Project: the multimedia school library Federal Ministry for Education, the Arts and Culture (BMUKK) Vienna Prof. Mag. Werner Schöggl (Project co- ordination) Service centre for school libraries - AHS Vienna Tel. 43-1/ 523 62 22 - 93278 Fax 43-1/523 62 22 99 93 210 Austria ongoing National Schools Net Communication for Learning Net Communication for Learning Course for students of Pedagogical Sciences (Master's Degree) Faculty of Education Sciences "Roma Tre" University, Rome Prof. Francesco Susi (Dean) Tel.: 06 49229323 Fax: 06 4463722 Italy 2006 National HE
  24. 24. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 40 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) "ORION" Information Literacy Tutorial Reference Services, Reference Services, "ORION" Information Literacy Tutorial Library of A.T.E.I. of Thessaloniki library@lib.teithe.gr Greece ongoing National VET Project IL I / Projekt IK I Information Literacy Project I (IL I) / Projekt Informationskompetenz I The Library of the University of Konstanz, Germany Oliver Kohl-Frey - Tel.:++49 - (0)7531 - 88 - 2835 - Fax: ++49 - (0)7531 - 88 - 3082 Germany 2003 2005 National HE Project Information Literacy II Joint Project on Comparative Research in Information Literacy for advanced students and staff members The Library of the University of Konstanz, Germany Bernd Schmid-Ruhe Tel: ++49/(0)7531/88-2804 - Fax: ++49/(0)7531/88-3082 Germany 2005 2007 National HE PUZZLE Increasing and supporting the individual demand for education in the Information Society Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Paris Cchretien-petiot@ccip.fr - Tel.: 33 1 55 65 67 90 - Fax: 33 1 55 65 66 94 France 2001 2004 GRUNDTVIG VET Recommendation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 on key competences for lifelong learning Recommendation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 on key competences for lifelong learning European Parliament & Council of the European Union, European Union Tel.: (32-2) 281 61 11 - Fax: (32-2) 281 69 34 European Union 2006 EU Schools
  25. 25. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 41 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) Recommendation for universities for including information literacy competency in the new degree structures Recommendation for universities for including information literacy competency in the new degree structures University of Helsinki, Finland Anne Lehto tel (09) 191 23958 Finland 2004 National HE Regional Public Library Seminars Regional Public Library Seminars Hacettepe University i Prof. Dr. Bülent Yılmaz Turkey 2002 ongoing National VET Retrieving and accessing scientific and technical information Accéder à l'information scientifique et technique (=Retrieving and accessing scientific and technical information) Institut Universitaire de Formation des Maitres d'Aquitaine "Academie de Bordeaux" anne.piponnier@aquitaine.iufm.fr Tel. +33.5.56.12.67.68 Fax: +33 5 56 12 67 99 France 2000 2003 COMENIUS VET SAPRISTI! SAPRISTI! – Access paths and tracks to search for scientific and technical information on the Internet Doc’Insa Lyon Monique Joly monique.joly@insa-lyon.fr France 1996 ongoing National HE School- documentalist teacher training School-documentalist teacher training (AY 2005-2006): distance course Department of Education Sciences Faculty of Education Sciences, University of Padua Prof. Donatella Lombello (course director) Italy 2005 2006 National VET The School on the Net The School on the Net Faculty of Education Sciences "Roma Tre" University, Rome Ornella Martini Tel.: 06 49229247 Fax: 06 491627 Italy 2005 ongoing National VET
  26. 26. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 42 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) Searching for and processing information - A high school project Searching for and processing information - A high school project “E. Fermi” Technical High School for Surveyors - Pistoia Prof. Roberto Cadonici (coordinator) Tel. 39-573-452638 Italy 2000 ongoing National Schools SEEKS - Adult Information Seeking Strategies in the Information Society SEEKS - Adult Information Seeking Strategies in the Information Society MANCHESTER METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY, UK b.jones-2@umist.ac.uk - Telephone +00 44 161 275 7255 - Fax +00 44 161 200 3505 United Kingdom 2001 2003 MINERVA VET Sieciaki.pl Sieciaki.pl – get to know the safe side of the internet Fundacja Dzieci Niczyje (Nobody's Children Foundation) marcin.solodki@fdn.pl, katarzyna.zygmunt@fdn.pl. Poland 2005 --- National Schools SLAM SLAM - School Libraries as Multimedia Centres PEDAGOGISK SENTER - KARMØY KOMMUNE - SKOLE- OG KULTURETATEN, Norway Per FAGERLAND tel.: +47 52811445 fax: +47 52855327 - per.fagerland@karmoyped.no Norway 1999 2000 MINERVA VET Statistical Literacy International Statistical Literacy Project International Statistical Institute reija.helenius@stat.fi International 1994 ongoing International common A Study on Equipping Students with Information Literacy Skills A Study on Equipping Students with Information Literacy Skills Serap Kurbano*lu; Buket Akkoyunlu serap@hacettepe.edu.tr buket@hacettepe.edu.tr Turkey 2001 2002 National Schools Study and information skills Study and information skills University of Ioannina - Central Library library@uoi.gr Greece National HE SWIM SWIM - Streaming Webbased Information Modules Aalborg University Library - Aalborg Maj Rosenstand Tel.: 9635 9349 Niels Jørgen Blåbjerg Tel.: 9635 7304 Denmark 2001 2003 National HE
  27. 27. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 43 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) SWIM tutorial SWIM - information search strategy Aalborg University Library - Aalborg Maj Rosenstand Tel.: 9635 9349 Niels Jørgen Blåbjerg Tel.: 9635 7304 Denmark 2001 2003 National HE Szkolenia - to si( op!aca Database of training offers PARP - the Polish Agency for Enterprise Development biuro@parp.gov.pl; www.parp.gov.pl; phone +48 22 432 80 80, +48 22 432 71 25 Poland 2010 2011 ESF VET Television News on Europe - Project on media education for compulsory schools in Europe Television News on Europe - Project on media education for compulsory schools in Europe KULTURRING IN BERLIN E.V. - Kulturring Institute, Germany Armin HOTTMANN Email LuArmHott@gmx.de T +49.30.513.97.49 F +49 30 513 97 55 Germany 1999 2002 COMENIUS Schools UNESCO Information and Media Literacy Information and Media Literacy UNESCO aw.khan@unesco.org International ongoing International common UNESCO International Conference Information Literacy The 2003 International Conference of Information Literacy Experts - Prague UNESCO aw.khan@unesco.org International 2003 2003 International common UNESCO International Colloquium Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning The 2005 High-Level International Colloquium on Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning UNESCO, NFIL, IFLA aw.khan@unesco.org International 2005 2005 International common
  28. 28. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 44 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) UNESCO Teacher-Training Curricula for Media and Information Literacy Teacher-Training Curricula for Media and Information Literacy UNESCO aw.khan@unesco.org International 2008 ongoing International VET UNESCO Training of Information Professionals Training of Information Professionals UNESCO aw.khan@unesco.org International 2002 2009 International VET UNESCO Training-the- Trainers in Information Literacy Training-the-Trainers in Information Literacy UNESCO aw.khan@unesco.org International 2007 2009 International VET UNESCO Training of Media Professionals Training of Media Professionals UNESCO aw.khan@unesco.org International 2002 ongoing International VET University of Crete: User's Training User's Training Library and Information Center of the Technical University of Crete info@library.tuc.gr Greece ongoing National HE University of Thessaly: Training & Information Support Training & Information Support Library & Information Center - University of Thessaly mbal@lib.uth.gr Greece ongoing National VET Using the Internet for Non- work Information Seeking Using the Internet for Non-work Information Seeking Department of Information Studies Tampere University Ari Haasio Finland ongoing National common
  29. 29. EMPATIC WP1/D1.1 Page 45 of 77 Initiative short name or acronym Initiative full name Author / Coordinator name Contact(s) Country Launch year End year Initiative frame Target Sector(s) / Segment(s) Value of data The value of data: to know more, to decide better ISTAT ilvaloredeidati@istat.it Italy 2002 ongoing National Schools VERITY Virtual and Electronic Resources for Information skills Training University of Sunderland, UK Jo AITKINS Tel:+44-191-5153915 Fax:+44-191-5152904 United Kingdom 1998 2000 FP4 Schools Web-Seal Web Searching, Information Literacy and Learning (Web- SeaL) University of Tampere - Department of Information Studies, Finland Eero Sormunen tel. +358-03-3551 6972 (office) tel. +358-50-362 8781 (mobile) Finland 2006 2009 National HE wkluczamy.PL wkluczamy.PL ("self e- inclusion"), the initiative to "upgrade" 50+ Silesians in the information society Association "Silesian Gallery of Ideas" stowarzyszenie@galeriaidei.pl; tel. +48 32 276 42 20; tel. gsm +48 604 476 069; www.galeriaidei.pl Poland 2009 ongoing Regional Adults The working group "The multimedia school library" The working group "The multimedia school library" Federal Ministry for Education, the Arts and Culture (BMUKK) Vienna Werner Schöggl (co-ordinator) Service centre for school libraries - AHS Vienna Tel. 43-1/ 523 62 22 - 93278 FAX 43-1/523 62 22 99 93 210 Austria National Schools
  30. 30. APPENDIX B
  31. 31.   14     Advice   from   the   International   Federation   of   Library   Associations   and   Institutions  (IFLA)     In  the  Guidelines  on  Information  Literacy  for  Lifelong  Learning  (Lau,  2006),  published  by  the   Information  Literacy  Section  of  IFLA  with  the  aim  of  providing  a  pragmatic  framework  for   those  professionals  who  are  interested  in  starting  an  Information  Literacy  program,  Jesus   Lau  identified  the  list  of  actions  to  be  undertaken.  He  writes:  The  complete  success  of  an   information  literacy  program  depends  on  the  commitment  at  the  institutional  level.  However,   a   commitment   is   not   always   present   or   clear   at   top   management   levels.   Therefore,   information  professionals  must  devote  time  to  create  the  relevant  strategies  to  convince  and   sell  the  benefits  of  information  literacy  to  institutional  leaders  to  get  their  support.  The  basic   steps  to  market  information  literacy  programs  (…)  are:   •    Adapt  or  adopt  international  information  literacy  standards  and  practices   •    Identify   the   information   literacy   program   that   works   best   for   you   and   your   institution   •    Adopt  or  design  a  program  based  on  national  and  international  experiences   •    Identify  what  is  required  to  implement  the  program   •    Regard   the   information   literacy   process   as   non-­‐linear,   you   may   skip   steps   and   change  their  order   •    Work  on  a  strategic  plan  to  chart  the  course  of  your  goals  and  actions  –See  Chapter   5  for  specifics   •    Involve   all   relevant   parties   in   the   planning   process:   your   library   team,   faculty/teachers,  administrators,  and  the  final  decision-­‐maker  for  the  project  (Lau,   2006,  p.  20).   Advice  from  the  UNESCO’s  Information  for  All  Programme  (IFAP)     The   Information   for   All   Programme   (IFAP)   is   intended   to   help   UNESCO   Member   States   develop   and   implement   national   information   policies   and   knowledge   strategies   using   information  and  communication  technologies  (ICT).  As  the  other  goals,  also  the  Information   Literacy  commitment  should  be  developed  and  implemented  by  IFAP  worldwide,  through   the  activities  that  should:   •    promote   international   reflection   and   debate   on   the   ethical,   legal   and   societal   challenges  of  the  information  society;   •    promote   and   widen   access   to   information   in   the   public   domain   through   the   organization,  digitization  and  preservation  of  information;   •    support   training,   continuing   education   and   lifelong   learning   in   the   fields   of   communication,  information  and  informatics;   •    support   the   production   of   local   content   and   foster   the   availability   of   indigenous   knowledge  through  basic  literacy  and  ICT  literacy  training;   •    promote  the  use  of  international  standards  and  best  practices  in  communication,   information  and  informatics  in  UNESCO's  fields  of  competence;  and   •     promote  information  and  knowledge  networking  at  local,  national,  regional  and   international  levels  (UNESCO  2011,         http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-­‐and-­‐information/intergovernmental-­‐ programmes/information-­‐for-­‐all-­‐programme-­‐ifap/about-­‐ifap/objectives/).    
  32. 32.   15       4.2     INFORMATION  LITERACY  IN  THE  SCHOOL  LEARNING  SECTOR  – Recommendations  to  Policy  Makers  (the  Comenius  programme  area)     Through   EMPATIC’s   validation   workshops,   a   process   of   consultation   and   the   Final   Conferences,  the  following  recommendations  to  policy  makers  in  the  schools’  sector  have   been  identified:     1. Information   Literacy   and   its   specialized   fields   must   be   promoted   to   society,   decision  makers,  politicians  and  users.     2. Clearly  formulated  national  IL  policy  assumptions  are  required;  some  elements  of   IL  development  strategies  are  present  in  European  countries  but  are  “taken-­‐for-­‐ granted”.   3. National  IL  development  strategies  should  be  flexible  and  built  on  an  all-­‐European   scheme   of   IL   standards,   and   those   in   turn   should   be   formulated   in   terms   of   learning  outcomes.  Consequently  there  is  a  strong  recommendation  to  prepare  IL   standards.   o Detailed   Information   Literacy   strategies   are   needed.   However,   educational   systems,  information  cultures,  and  experiences  with  IL  development  in  every   EU  country  are  different,  so  what  works  in  one  part  of  Europe  may  not  work   in  another.  As  a  result  it  would  be  better  to  formulate  European  Information   Literacy  standards  in  terms  of  learning  outcomes;  these  would  identify  a  set   of  IL  goals  to  be  achieved  in  different  appropriate  ways  and  by  various  means   within   formal,   informal   and   non-­‐formal   learning   environments.   In   other   words,   the   aims   of   IL   should   be   the   same   across   Europe   in   general,   but   IL   development  strategies  need  to  be  national  in  specifics.   4. Ministries  of  education,  departments  of  Library  and  Information  Science  at  higher   educational  institutions  and  relevant  libraries  should  cooperate  with  each  other.   5. Identification   of   roles   for   multi-­‐dimensional   cooperation   of   different   IL   stakeholders   is   crucial   (for   example,   local   authorities   and   other   local   figures,   parents,  school  authorities,  students,  teachers).   o It  is  not  simple  to  indicate  who  is  to  be  responsible  for  the  introduction  and   development  of  Information  Literacy,  but  surely  it  could  be  national,  central   units.   Generally,   central   bodies   are   appropriate   to   set   goals   but   the   cooperative  work  of  all  interested  parties  and  stakeholders  at  local  level,  in   local  communities,  is  where  real  work  is  or  can  be  achieved.   6. School   management   and   teachers   are   the   most   important   stakeholders   in   the   schools  sector,  they  must  be  aware  of  what  Information  Literacy  is,  why  it  is  so   important  and  how  to  learn/teach  IL  in  schools.   o All   the   changes   related   to   Information   Literacy   development   in   the   school   (formal   education)   learning   sector   should   start   with   the   involvement   of   teachers;  they  need  to  be  convinced  and  trained  in  the  IL  didactics.  School   teachers  are  the  basis  of  educational  systems  and  send  the  most  influential   messages  to  their  students/children  in  schools.   7. School  libraries  are  important  and  the  impact  of  the  school  library  function  must   be  shown.  
  33. 33.   16     8. Librarians/information   professionals,   who   are   traditionally   engaged   in   IL-­‐related   matters  everywhere,  must  cooperate  with  all  other  parties/stakeholders  involved   in  the  educational  processes,  to  include:  headmasters,  teachers,  parents,  students,   local  authorities,  and  other  people  having  important  social  functions  in  their  local   communities  (police  officers,  fire-­‐fighters,  priests,  etc.).   9. Real  work  at  the  local  level  is  the  most  important  factor  for  IL  development  in  the   school  sector  in  Europe,  and  as  a  result  it  has  to  be  strongly  supported  by  national   and  European  law  and  policy  makers.   10. The   young   generation,   so-­‐called   “digital   natives”,   do   not   necessarily   have   an   “inherent”  culture  of  information;  they  also  must  undergo  education  and  training   in  the  field  of  Information  Literacy.   11. National   education   policies   are   the   power   of   national   governments;   it   is   imperative   to   implement   IL   in   all   school   policies   that   recommend   output-­‐based   learning.     4.3     INFORMTIOAN  LITERACY  IN  THE  HIGHER  EDUCATION  LEARNING  SECTOR  (HE)   Recommendations  to  Policy  Makers  (the  Erasmus  programme  area)     Through   EMPATIC’s   validation   workshops,   a   process   of   consultation   and   the   Final   Conference,   the   following   set   of   recommendations   has   been   drafted   to   address   different   levels  of  government,  from  the  European  Union,  through  National  and  National  Academic   Systems,  to  the  individual  university  level.   1. Information   Literacy   and   its   specialized   fields   must   be   promoted   to   society,   decision  makers,  politicians  and  users.     2. Ministries  of  education,  departments  of  Library  and  Information  Science  at  higher   educational  institutions  and  relevant  libraries  should  cooperate  with  each  other.     3. European  Higher  Education  Area:  Information  Literacy  should  be  embedded  into   the   Bologna   process   as   a   new   learning   outcome,   in   order   to   fully   legitimise   Information  Literacy  within  and  at  the  level  of  European  Higher  Education  Area   (European  Commission  policy  level).   4. Support  a  European  Information  Literacy  Model:  the  diffusion  of  the  revised  2011   SCONUL  Information  Literacy  model  for  Higher  Education  should  be  supported  as   it   is   a   European   model,   widely   accepted   in   Europe   and   translated   into   various   European  languages.  Originally  (1999)  conceived  for  the  Higher  Education  sector,   its  successful  diffusion  in  European  countries,  led  to  the  definition  of  a  core  model   and   a   number   of   so-­‐called   “lenses”,   each   for   a   different   group   of   learners   (European  Commission  -­‐  Supranational  policy  level).   5. Information  Literacy  must  be  implemented  within  a  curricular  integration  process   in  Higher  Education  courses  of  study,  similar  to  the  process  already  established  for   Computer  Literacy  (University  policy  level).  
  34. 34.   17       6. Legitimatise  a  curricular  configuration  for  Information  Literacy  to  be  diffused  in   European   universities   (Academic   system   policy   level).   Three   different   levels,   together  with  number  of  credits,  were  suggested:   o Library  delivered  (2-­‐4  credits)   o Academic  delivered  (4  credits)   o Embedded  (credits  included  within  the  subject  credit  amount)   7. Educational   continuum:   in   the   long   term,   Higher   Education   educational   policies   will  take  large  benefit  from  the  full  integration  of  Information  Literacy  into  school   curricula  (National  policy  level).   8. Syllabus   definition:   syllabi   should   be   tailored   according   to   the   context   of   the   specific   information   habit   of   the   discipline/subject   involved   (University   policy   level).   9. Institutionalisation  of  approach:  a  governance  approach  should  be  supportive  of   the  overall  process  of  Information  Literacy  institutionalisation  in  Higher  Education,   since   it   is   an   issue   crossing   the   domains   of   information   and   education   policies   (Academic  system  policy  level).   Targeting  central  policy  makers  may  have  greater  potential  for  change  than  working  at  local   levels,  through  'slow  research'  and  similar  processes.     4.4     INFORMATION  LITERACY  IN  THE  VOCATIONAL  EDUCATION  AND  TRAINING   SECTOR  (VET)   Recommendations  to  Policy  Makers  (the  Leonardo  da  Vinci  programme   area)     Through   EMPATIC’s   validation   workshops,   a   process   of   consultation   and   the   Final   Conference  the  following  recommendations  to  policy  makers  in  the  VET  sector  have  been   identified:     1. National  VET  policies  should  be  developed  and  information  literacy  must  be  a  vital   part  of  these  policies.   2. Awareness   of   IL   should   be   created   for   society,   decision   makers,   politicians   and   users.  In  this  context,  ministries  of  education,  librarians’  associations,  departments   of   information   management   at   universities   and   all   relevant   institutions   should   cooperate  with  each  other.   3. Information   literacy   should   be   integrated   into   the   official   lifelong   learning   programs  of  ministries  of  education.   4. Information   literacy   should   be   integrated   into   the   VET   activities   arranged   by   municipalities,   ministries,   universities   and   the   other   institutions.   In   this   framework,  IL  should  be  connected  to  municipalities  and  ministries.   5. Social  awareness  of  literacy  should  be  included  within  work  culture  and  the  way   employers   view   it;   VET   provides   a   mobile   work   force   and   innovative   economy   within  Europe.    
  35. 35.   18     6. In  cooperation  with  library  associations,  Departments  of  Information  Management   and  other  relevant  parties  at  universities  should  organize  projects  and  curriculum   about  information  literacy-­‐VET  to  fulfil  the  holistic  education  of  trainers.   7. Educational  content  and  appropriate  materials  related  to  information  literacy  in   VET  should  be  prepared.   8. Courses  should  be  organized  through  cooperation  with  public  libraries  to  provide   people  with  competence  in  information  literacy.   9. Ministries   should   give   appropriate   consideration   and   recognition   to   the   attendance   and   experience   in   education   on   information   literacy   and   VET   when   considering  workers’  careers.   10. Awareness  of  IL  is  necessary  at  all  levels;  national,  local  and  institutional  bodies   must  work  together.     11. Lobbying  for  IL  in  VET  (and  indeed  all  sectors  of  education)  should  be  made  to   national  government  and  EU  politicians.   12. International   projects   and   cooperation   concerning   VET   and   information   literacy   should  be  developed.     13. Distance  education  possibilities  for  IL  in  VET  must  be  explored  and  fully  utilized.       4.5     INFORMATION  LITERACY  IN  THE  ADULT  LEARNING  SECTOR  –   Recommendations  to  Policy  Makers  (the  grundtvig  programme  area)     Through   EMPATIC’s   validation   workshops,   a   process   of   consultation   and   the   Final   Conference,  the  following  recommendations  to  policy  makers  in  the  adult  education/lifelong   learning  sector  have  been  identified:     1.     Information   Literacy   and   its   specialized   fields   must   be   promoted   to   society,   decision  makers,  politicians,  communities  and  users.     2.     Ministries  of  education  and  lifelong  learning,  departments  at  higher  educational   institutions,   all   relevant   institutions   and   libraries   should   cooperate   with   each   other.     3.     National  strategies  should  follow  from  development  of  a  European  scheme  of  IL   standards,  assessment  types  and  learning  outcomes.   4.     Lobbying  for  the  integration  of  IL  into  Adult  Education  &  Lifelong  Learning  must  be   undertaken   to   the   EU,   national   politicians,   public   libraries   and   all   relevant   institutions.   5.     Departments   of   Library   and   Information   Science,   information   literacy   professionals  and  all  relevant  bodies  should  work  together  to  prepare  educational   content  and  materials  related  to  Information  Literacy.     6.     The  learner  must  be  more  active  and  become  a  partner  in  the  process.   7.     The  media  are  very  important;  these  can  include  music,  radio,  local  newspapers,   and  popular  activities  such  as  drama  and  local  associations.   8.     IL  should  be  integrated  into  all  Lifelong  Learning  activities  that  are  run  by  various   organizations  in  a  practical  way,  this  could  be  through  financial  information,  health   education,  cultural  information,  etc.  
  36. 36.   19     9.     International   cooperation   concerning   Adult   Education   and   Information   Literacy   should  be  developed.     10.    Consequently,   advocating   IL   must   be   undertaken   on   national,   local,   community   and  institutional  levels  simultaneously.   11.   Modern   technologies   to   apply   IL   in   Adult   Education   &   Life   Long   Learning   (e.g.   Web2.0,  e-­‐conferences)  must  be  utilized.   12.  Public  Libraries  have  a  very  important  role  to  play  in  the  application  of  IL  in  Adult   Education   and   Lifelong   Learning   and   therefore   have   to   be   helped   in   order   to   succeed  in  it.     4.6.    INFORMATION  LITERACY  IN  THE  FOUR  LEARNING  SECTORS  (SCHOOL,   HIGHER  EDUCATION,  VOCATIONAL  EDUCATION  AND  TRAINING,  AND   ADULT/LIFELONG  LEARNING)  –  GENERAL,  NON-­‐SECTOR  SPECIFIC   Recommendations  to  Policy  Makers  made  by  the  final  conferences   participants     As  a  result  the  following  general  recommendations  of  both  strategic  and  tactical  nature  have   been  formulated:   1. Information  Literacy  is  vital  for  the  today’s  society  in  Europe  and  as  such  should  be   developed  and  promoted  in  different  contexts  and  by  various  means.     2. The   importance   of   Information   Literacy   needs   to   be   publicized   not   only   to   governments,  ministries  and  policy  makers  at  national  and  EU  levels  but  also  to   local  authorities,  businesses,  small  social  groups  and  all  citizens.     3. The  strategy  of  IL  development  should  encompass  two  main  lines  of  action:     o IL   awareness   building   among   authorities   and   governments   at   national   and   European  levels   o Substantial,  real  work,  “step  by  step”,  “project  by  project”  on  the  local  level   by  individual  schools,  universities,  libraries,  etc.   4. Most   participants   expressed   the   feeling   that   “slow”   strategy,   based   on   “small   projects”   addressed   to   different   target   groups,   communities,   professions,   etc.   would   be   more   effective   than   having   a   central   EU   body   responsible   for   the   IL   development  or  the  formal  European  IL  policy  directives.  Thus,  the  “IL  awareness   building”   and   “central   goals”   approach   clearly   prevailed   over   the   “central   steering”   one.   Also,   having   clearly   stated   Information   Literacy   goals   (national,   European)   may   help   to   convince/influence   local   authorities   to   support   IL   development  programmes.     5. “Incentives  work  better  than  orders”,  meaning  that  IL  development  policy  based   on   incentives   for   those   who   introduce   IL   (teachers,   librarians,   businesses,   local   authorities)  would  be  an  effective  strategy.  EMPATIC  had  started  a  process  for  the   identification  of  past  experience  and  development  of  case  studies  of  good  practice   through  EC-­‐funded  programmes.  However,  this  approach  should  be  extended  to   all  known  IL  and  Information  Competencies  projects.  This  is  important  for  policy   makers.    
  37. 37.   20     5.    CONCLUSIONS       To   sum   up,   the   recommendations   related   to   Information   Literacy   development   on   the   national  and  international  scale  are  as  follows:     •    initiating   and   promoting   activities   associated   with   the   provision   of   access   to   information  and  the  reducing  of  barriers  in  the  use  of  it  –  creating  and  maintaining   the  infrastructure  to  meet  information  needs  (e.g.  digitisation);   •    including  Information  Literacy  in  the  national  strategies  for  Lifelong  Learning,  the   development  of  IL  competences  should  be  a  part  of  the  national  LLL  projects;     •    assessing  the  existing  “starting”  level  of  IL  competences  in  various  social  groups;     •    creating   national   policies   to   involve   various   IL   stakeholders,   i.e.   business,   educational,   governmental   and   labour   market   institutions,   libraries,   NGOs,   in   the   training  of  information  competences;   •    determining  a  set  of  indicators  of  the  IL  development  at  the  national  level,  to  be   able  to  verify  the  extent  to  which  national  IL  policies  are  realized  (compare  Towards   Information  Literacy  Indicators  by  UNESCO,  Catts  and  Lau,  2008);   •    creating   the   working   networks   of   institutions   involved   in   the   IL   education   and   training   central   and   local   governments,   libraries,   educational   institutions,   labour   market  institutions,  NGOs,  etc.  ;   •    including  IL  to  curricula  of  general  and  specialized  education  at  all  levels;   •    introducing  IL  into  the  standards  of  teachers’  training.       All   EMPATIC   partners   and   stakeholder   communities   are   now   encouraged   to   take   up,   promote   and   implement   the   findings   and   recommendations   to   begin   the   process   of   influencing  policy  makers.  

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