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Online consumer persuasion: a short introduction.

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Online consumer persuasion: a short introduction.

  1. 1. Online consumer persuasion: a short introduction Interactive Marketing 24th of February 2015 Dr Lukasz Piwek @motioninsocial
  2. 2. digital reality
  3. 3. EMAIL SEND (every minute) 279 million PHOTOS UPLOADED AND SHARED 500 million (every minute) SEARCHES (every minute) 2.8 million
  4. 4. VIEWS (every minute) 3.2 million WEBSITES CREATED (every minute) 839 TWEETS (every minute) 278,000
  5. 5. SALES (every minute) $100,000 LIKES (every minute) 2.6 million PEOPLE WATCHING PORN 124,000 (every minute)
  6. 6. PEOPLE CONNECTED TO INTERNET PEOPLE SHOPPING ONLINE (2013) 2.3 billion 3 billion ONLINE SALES ARE WORTH (2013) £588 billion growing by 19% every year (2015)
  7. 7. PEOPLE WITH SMARTPHONES GLOBALLY 1.8 billion ADULTS WITH SMARTPHONES IN UK 80% EVERYONE WILL HAVE SMARTPHONE BY 2025
  8. 8. the Internet and digital technology have changed consumption patterns, marketing, economy, everything.
  9. 9. consumer choice
  10. 10. vs vs vs
  11. 11. ego depletion resisting temptation takes considerable effort and energy and after some time our capacity to resist is exhausted leading to (Baumaister et al, 1998)
  12. 12. complexity of consumer decisions can result in ego depletion depleted consumers are more likely to become passive and make more impulsive decisions Baumaister et al (2005)
  13. 13. if you’re ego depleted you’re more likely to be selfish use sexist language make superficial judgements Muraven et al (2003) Baumaister et al (2005) Gaillot et al (2007)
  14. 14. judges grant more parole in the morning and just after lunchtime Danziger et al (2011)
  15. 15. behaviour economics with examples of: ego depletion priming
  16. 16. behaviour economics “we are not always rational, and we often make mistakes” we are susceptible to influences from our immediate environment, irrelevant emotions, stereotypes, beliefs, norms, and many other factors
  17. 17. system 1 system 2 automatic & unconscious rapid & low effort recognition, perception, orientation nonverbal control & conscious slow & high effort rule following, comparison complex computations linked to language Dual process theory Stanovich & West (2000)
  18. 18. priming automatic memory effect in which exposure to one stimulus influences a response to another stimulus
  19. 19. support to increase funding for schools is higher if voting takes place in schools Berger et al. (2008)
  20. 20. priming people with money makes them more selfish Vochs (2006)
  21. 21. people litter less in the train if there is a smell of cleaning product De Lange et al (2012)
  22. 22. women who were exposed to flowers perceived the man to be more attractive and sexier Gueguen (2011)
  23. 23. more donation made when word ‘love’ was added to message Gueguen (2011)
  24. 24. children consumed 45% more food when exposed to food advertising in cartoons Harris et al (2009)
  25. 25. online persuasionwith examples related to Cialdini’s social influence Fogg’s persuasive technology
  26. 26. judgement heuristics are mental shortcuts we employ in making our everyday judgements Kahneman et al (1982)
  27. 27. Ashmore et al (1971) Worchel (1992) Cialdini (2001) scarcity a perceived limitation of resources will generate demand scarce items are perceived as higher in value and more attractive especially if we compete for them
  28. 28. metro.co.uk
  29. 29. Ashmore et al (1971) Worchel (1992) scarcity a perceived limitation of resources will generate demand example nightclub queue “deadline tactic”
  30. 30. scarcity a perceived limitation of resources will generate demand
  31. 31. reciprocity people tend to return a favour we may feel in debt by getting uninvited favour small initial favour can produce obligation to agree to much larger return favour Pease & Gilin (2000)
  32. 32. reciprocity people tend to return a favour examples mail appeal for donation: 18% success - mail only 35% success - mail + gift free sample in supermarket Cialdini (2001) Wasko et al (2005)
  33. 33. reciprocity people tend to return a favour
  34. 34. Amount Twitter makes each time you look at your feed $0.0008
  35. 35. reciprocity people tend to return a favour
  36. 36. commitment consistency people don’t like to be self-contradictory Cialdini (2001) example “throwing a low-ball” in car sales by adding “surprise” costs at the end of transaction after initial agreements, and test drives
  37. 37. commitment consistency people don’t like to be self-contradictory
  38. 38. social proof people will be more open to things they see others doing Provine (2000) Nosanchuk & Lightstone (1974) Darley & Lantane (1968) example “canned laughter” in a comedy makes audience laugh longer and more often, rate material as funnier especially effective for poor jokes bystander effect
  39. 39. social proof people will be more open to things they see others doing
  40. 40. Average industry profit per commercial-flight passenger $4
  41. 41. liking people are more easily swayed by people they like Langlois et al (2000) Berscheider & Walster (1978) attractiveness attractive individuals are perceived as talented, kind, honest, intelligent similarity even small similarities produce positive impression compliments good cop/bad cop
  42. 42. liking people are more easily swayed by people they like
  43. 43. personalised & timed suggestions
  44. 44. personalised & timed suggestions
  45. 45. personalised & timed suggestions scarcity
  46. 46. one-click choice easy commitment reduction & simplifying higher motivation to engage reduced cognitive effort quicker goal achievement & quick decision can be rewarding (but also regrettable) Fogg (1998) Bandura (1997) Desphande et al (1983)
  47. 47. lukasz.piwek@uwe.ac.uk @motioninsocial motioninsocial.com/persuasion_intro thank you get those slides on

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