Vishy Anand:
My Best Games of Chess
Revised and expanded edition
Vishy Anand
(in collaboration with John Nunn}
CdAI�IBIITI
First published in the UK by Gambit Publications Ltd 200I
Reprinted 2004, 2008
Original edition published by Gambit Public...
Contents
Introduction 5
I V. Anand- v. Inkiov, Calcutta 1986 7
2 V. Anand- K. Ninov, World Junior Championship,
Baguio Cit...
4 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
29 V. Anand-J, Polgar, Linares 1994 153
30 V. Anand-G. Kamsky, PCA Candidates (3), L...
Introduction
I don't want to spend toomuch time on biographical details, because this is a
book about my games, soI will b...
6 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
However, losing this match was not the end of the world and in 1996 Iwas
back on the...
Game 1
V. Anand - V. lnkiov
Calcutta 1986
Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer
1 e4 cS
2 lLi3 d6
3 d4 cxd4
4 �d4 .!M6
s 00 �
6 i.gS e6...
8 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
13 ... l:l.xd8
Mter l 3.....txd8 14 lllxe4 ..te7
(l4...lllxe4 15 ..txd8 lllxf2 16 l:...
ANAND - INKIOV, CALCUITA 1986 9
.bd6 23 dxe6 i.e? 24 exf7+ �xf7
with fair compensation for the pawn.
2b) 19 cxb5! (this co...
10 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
2) 22.. .a4 (by not allowing lt:la4,
Black gets some counterplay) and
now:
2a) 23lt...
36lW
37 bC'i!
38 b7
39 �b4
ANAND - INKIOV. CALCUTTA /986
40 b81t'
41 1tb7+
42 'i!t'dS+
43 c5
lba2
�d3
�e2
1-0
11
The 1987W...
Game 2
V. Anand - K. Ninov
World Junior Championship, Baguio City 1987
Sicilian, Kan
1 e4 cS
2 lbf'3 e6
3 d4 cxd4
4 liJxd4...
ANAND - NINOV, BAGU/0 CITY 1987 13
immediate problems with his d6-
pawn, due to the exchange of dark­
squared bishops and ...
14 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
White's bishop), but in fact 21 Wei!
ifh2+ 22 'it>d2 is clearly better for
White- B...
8
ANAND- NINOV, BAGU/0 CITY 1987 15
It isn't every day you see two at­
tacking pawns on f6 and g6! When
you get a position...
Game 3
V. Anand - 5. Agdestein
World Junior Championship, Baguio City 1987
Ruy Lopez
1 e4 tt'lc6
A provocative move. At th...
ANAND - AGDFSTE/N, BAGU/0 CITY 1987 17
White avoids the exchange of
queens as most of his chances lie in
exploiting Black'...
18 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
leave d5 hanging.White is certainly
not worse, but Black would have far
more counte...
ANAND - AGDESTE/N, BAGU/0 Crrr 1987 19
havea good position, the temptation
is justto play easy, comfortable moves
and wait...
20 V!SHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
with the manoeuvres ...iLb7-c8 and
...iLf8-e7-d6.
22 iLe7
Black would like to play ...
ANAND - AGDESI"EIN, BAGUIO CITY 1987 21
32 e3?
Blackdecidestocounterattack, but
now White's win is fairly straight­
forwar...
22 V!SHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
my play there, I didn't get invited again!). Then I was asked to bea commen­
tator ...
Game 4
V. Anand - J. Benjamin
Wijk aan lee 1989
Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer
1 e4 cS
2 lt:f3 d6
3 d4 cxd4
4 tt:lxd4 tt:lr6
s w...
24 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
now Vassily said that 8. ..'ifc7 was
supposed to be a good move. He ex­
plained tha...
ANAND - BENJAMIN, WIJK AAN ZEE 1989 25
12 .hr6 dxe4?
Benjamin falls for it hook, line
and sinker. He could still have bail...
26 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
16 ... .te6
17 lMe4
White already has to take care:
not 17 .i.c4? .i.xc4 18ltJxc4 '...
ANAND - BENJAMIN, WIJK AAN ZEE 1989 27
.A.e3! aren't easy moves to find over
lhe board.
22 l:tbel? (D)
Missing 22 &2! l:l....
28 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
r1 lhe3 lMS
28 �dS+
An important intermezzo. 28 .l:tf3
is amistake because of 28......
Game 5
M. Tal - V. Anand
Youth vs Veterans, Cannes 1 989
English
I met MishaTal forthe first time when I visited theWorld ...
30 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
6
7 .i.b2
8 g3
9 .i.g2
Two years later, I beat Karpov
with 9...llli'6; the tactical...
TAL - ANAND, CANNES 1989
17 1fb6 25 c5
31
The reason why 'ifd3 was bad - There is no other defence against
b3 is undefende...
32 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
30...l:l.c7! would have been bru­
tally effective- Black simply main­
tains his a-p...
TAL - ANAND, CANNES 1989 33
36 <i>gl
Or 36 fxe3 'l'c2+ 37 �h3 :h4+!
38gxh4:f3+ 39 �g4 'l'g2#.
36 -·
'fic2
37 lin llxd3
0-1...
Game 6
V. Anand - B. Spassky
Youth vs Veterans, Cannes 1989
Ruy Lopez, Breyer
1 e4 eS
During the course of his career,
Spa...
ANAND - SPASSKY, CANNES 1989 35
13 ••• dS
Black is not worse after the text­
move. but 13...li:lxe4 would have
equalized s...
36 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
White could have maintained
some slight pressure by 19 .ig5, as
Spassky pointed out...
ANAND - SPASSKY. CANNES 1989 17
27 �g5+ 'it>h8 (27...�d5 28 'I'd! !
With aclear extta pawn) 28 'iVg3 and
White is clearly ...
18 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
38 �b3?!
Thiswouldhave been the moment
to settle for 38 l:tg7! �e5 (38...�e8
39 �de...
ANAND - SPASSKY, CANNES 1989 39
White) 50 a6 .ie8 5 1 itld5 �e6 52
lOc7+ ci.>d6 53 itlxe8+ �c6 and the
king catches the a-...
Game 7
M. Kuijf - V. Anand
Wijk aan lee 1 990
Ponziani Opening
1 e4 e5
Round abouta month before Ihad
beaten Kuijf in the ...
M. KUIJF - ANAND, WIJK AAN ZEE 1990 41
stronger. Technically, it may be a
aovelty, but I am reluctant to call it
that To m...
42 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
The threat is ...f4, so White re- 17 � J:tg8
sorts to desperation. 18 l:!.ael h6
1S...
Game S
M. Petursson - V. Anand
Manila Interzonal 1990
Queen's Pawn
1 d4 d6
2 c4 eS
This was part of my usual open­
ing rep...
44 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
�5 l 3 b3 White has secured his
queensidepawn structure. Ofcourse
the immediate 1 1...
PETURSSON - ANAND, MANILA INTERZONAL 1990 45
18 ••. .be6
Now Black is much better; his
pieces are active and the c4-pawn i...
46 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
by 26...lbe5, and Black has a large
advantage.
24 f4!
More or less equalizing.
24 •...
PETURSSON - ANAND, MANIU INIEKUJNAL 1990 47
I could have forced a draw by defensive moves subconsciously re-
33...li:'lxe4...
48
43 g4
44 l:a7
45 l:a6
VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
46 l:a3
47 �g3
0-1
.i.dl
b4
This game put me on + 1, but alth...
Game 9
V. Anand - I. Morovic Fernandez
Novi Sad Olympiad 1990
Sicilian, Maroczy Bind
1 e4 cS
2 lllf3 lllc6
3 d4 cxd4
4 lll...
50 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
11 'ifd2
A flexible alternative; Whitekeeps
open the possibility of b4 while de­
ve...
ANAND - MOROVIC FERNANDEZ, NOV! SAD OLYMPIAD 1990 51
16 ••• f6
17 .i.g4
A nice move, activating White's
bishop. Hedoesn't ...
52 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
look after e7, as the rook can always
be driven away by ..th5.
22 ••• �h8
23 a3
Bla...
ANAND - MOROV/t FERNANDEZ. NOV/ SAD OLYMPIAD 1990 53
take the c4-pawn in return,which
should be enough foc a clear advan­
...
Game 10
A. Beliavsky - V. Anand
Munich 1991
Pirc Defence
In our previous encounter (Linares
1991) I had built upa totally ...
BEUAVSKY - ANAND, MUNICH 1991 55
Black may be left with a weak pawn
(for example, on e6) but it doesn't
matter because Bla...
56 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
19 c4!
Essential. IfWhitecouldplay.i.c4,
then Black would be in some trou­
ble. Now...
BEUAVSKY - ANAND, MUNICH 1991 57
3) 24g4 tiJg7 25 'l'h6 tiJe6 26 h4
c3 27 bxc3 (27 �g5 c2+ 28 �a!
cxdl'l'+ 29 .l%xdl �xg5 ...
58 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
In the second game I outplayed Karpov completely, but then went wrong
and had to ac...
Game 11
A. Karpov - V. Anand
Candidates match (6), Brussels 1991
Semi-Slav
1 d4 dS
2 c4 c:6
3 lllf3 �f6
4 0.c3 e6
5 eJ �bd...
60 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
2) 19....ixd4+ 20 :Xd4 ll:le8 21
l:l.fd1 and White is clearly better.
After the tex...
KARPOV - ANAND, BRUSSELS CANDIDKTES 1991 61
2a) 26 .tc3?! lllxf3+ 27 �g2
®14+ 28 1i>fl (28 'iii>g1 'ifc6 is dead
lost) 28_...
62 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
24 �a2
It's hard to say what this move is
for. Perhaps he was worried that af­
ter ...
KARPOV - ANAND, BRUSSEU CANDIDKI'ES 1991 63
.A.h2+ 36 �hl .i.£4+ 37 'iilgl :tc6,
and the possibility of playing ...e5
and ...
64 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
45 �d2
I decided not to try to find a mid­
dlegame win, but just to liquidate
down ...
KARPOV - ANAND, BRUSSEI.S CANDIDATES 1991 65
Already 58 fxe5 l::txe5+ 59 'it>f2
was more accurate, when Black has
a long w...
66 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS
I missed a forced win in the seventh game and then he won the eighth game
totake th...
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Anand   my best games of chess (expanded edition)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Anand my best games of chess (expanded edition)

2,505 views

Published on

ajedrez

Published in: Education
2 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,505
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
309
Comments
2
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Anand my best games of chess (expanded edition)

  1. 1. Vishy Anand: My Best Games of Chess Revised and expanded edition Vishy Anand (in collaboration with John Nunn} CdAI�IBIITI
  2. 2. First published in the UK by Gambit Publications Ltd 200I Reprinted 2004, 2008 Original edition published by Gambit Publications Ltd 1998 Copyright© Vishy Anand andJohn Nunn 1998, 2001 The right of Vishy Anand and John Nunn to be identified as the authors of this work has been asserted in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. All rights reserved.Thisbook is sold subject tothecondition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, re-sold, hired out or otherwise circu­ lated in any form of binding or coverotherthan that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition being imposedon the subsequent purchaser. ISBN-13: 978-1-901983-54-8 ISBN-10: 1-901983-54-4 (Firstedition: ISBN-13: 978-1-90 1 983-5 ISBN-10: 1-901983-00-5) DISTRIBUTION: Worldwide (except USA): Central Books Ltd, 99 Wallis Rd. London E9 5LN, England. Tel +44 (0)20 8986 4854 Fax +44 (0)20 8533 5821. E-mail: orders@Centralbooks.com Gambit Publications Ltd, 99 Wallis Rd, London E9 5LN, England. E-mail: info@gambitbooks.com Website (regularly updated): www.gambitbooks.com Edited by Graham Burgess Typeset by John Nunn Printed in GreatBritain by The Cromwell Press, Trowbridge, Wilts. Coverphotograph by Dagobert Kohlmeyer. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 Gambit Publications Ltd Managing Director: GM Murray Chandler Chess Director: GM John Nunn Editorial Director: FM Graham Burgess German Editor: WFM Petra Nunn Webmaster: Dr Helen Milligan WFM
  3. 3. Contents Introduction 5 I V. Anand- v. Inkiov, Calcutta 1986 7 2 V. Anand- K. Ninov, World Junior Championship, Baguio City 1987 1 2 3 V. Anand- S. Agdestein, World Junior Championship, Baguio City 1987 16 4 V. Anand -J. Benjamin, Wijk aan Zee 1989 23 5 M. Thl- V. Anand, Youth vs Veterans, Cannes 1989 29 6 V. Anand - B. Spassky, Youth vs Veterans, Cannes 1989 34 7 M. Kuijf- V. Anand, Wijk aan Zee 1990 40 8 M. Petursson - V. Anand, Manila Interzonal/990 43 9 V. Anand - I. Morovic Fernandez, Novi Sad Olympiad 1990 49 10 A. Beliavsky - V. Anand, Munich 1991 54 1 1 A. Karpov - V. Anand, Candidates match (6), Brussels 1991 59 1 2 V. Anand - G. Kasparov, 1ilburg 1991 67 13 G. Kasparov - V. Anand, Reggio Emilia 199112 74 14 V. Anand -E. Bareev, Dortmund 1992 8 1 15 V. Anand - R. Hiibner, Dortmund 1992 87 16 V. Anand- I. Sokolov, SWIFT rapid, Brussels 1992 90 17 V. lvanchuk - V. Anand, Match (1), Linares 1992 92 18 V. Anand - G. Kamsky, Alekhine Memorial, Moscow 1992 98 19 V. Anand - V. Ivanchuk, Linares 1993 102 20 B. Gelfand - V. Anand, Linares 1993 106 21 V. Anand- E. Bareev, Linares 1993 1 10 22 V. Anand - F. Izeta, Madrid 1993 1 15 23 V. Anand - L. Ftacnik, Biel Interzonal 1993 1 19 24 L. 011 - V. Anand, Biel Interzonal/993 126 25 M. Adams - V. Anand, European Clubs Cup Final, Hilversum1993 130 26 V. Anand - A. Be1iavsky, PCA Qualifier. Groningen 1993 136 27 J. Benjamin - V. Anand, PCA Qualifier. Groningen 1993 142 28 V. Anand - G. Kamsky, Linares 1994 148
  4. 4. 4 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 29 V. Anand-J, Polgar, Linares 1994 153 30 V. Anand-G. Kamsky, PCA Candidates (3), Las Palmas 1995 157 31 V. Anand- G. Kamsky, PCA Candidates (9), Las Palmas 1995 164 32 V. Anand-G. Kamsky, PCA Candidates (11), Las Palmas 1995 171 33 V. Anand -J. Timman, Tal Memorial, Riga 1995 176 34 V. Anand - G. Kasparov, PCA World Championship (9), New York 1995 184 35 V. Anand -B. Gelfand, Wijk aanZee 1996 189 36 V. Anand -J. Polgar, Amber Rapid, Monte Carlo 1996 198 37 V. Anand-V. Topalov, Donmund 1996 202 38 V. Anand-V. lvanchuk, Las Palmas 1996 207 39 V. Anand-A. Karpov, Las Palmas 1996 2 l l 40 V. Anand -J, Lautier, Biel/997 216 41 J. Lautier - V. Anand, Biel/997 220 42 V. Kramnik - V. Anand, Belgrade 1997 225 43 P. Nikolic- V. Anand, FIDE World Ch., Groningen 1997 234 44 V. Anand -A. Shirov, FIDE World Ch., Groningen 1997 238 45 V. Anand- A. Karpov, FIDE World Ch. Final (6), Lausanne 1998 244 46 V. Anand-V. Topalov, Wijk aan Zee 1998 249 47 V. Ivanchuk-V. Anand, Linares 1998 253 48 V. Anand-V. Kr amnik, 1ilburg 1998 2S7 49 V. Anand-L. 011, European Clubs Cup, Belgrade 1999 262 50 D. Reindennan-V. Anand, Wijk aan Zee 1999 269 5 1 V. Anand-J. Piket, Wijk aan Zee 1999 273 52 V. Anand-P. Svidler, Linares 1999 277 53 V. Topalov-V. Anand, Linares 1999 283 54 V. Anand-P. Nikolic, Wijk aan Zee 2000 291 55 V. Anand-A. Khalifman, FIDE World Cup, Shenyang 2000 297 56 V. Anand-M. Adams, FIDE World Ch., New Delhi 2000 304 57 V. Anand - A. Shirov, FIDE World Ch. Final (4), Teheran 2000 3ll Combinations Solutions Index of Opponents Index of Openings Symbols 316 326 335 336 336
  5. 5. Introduction I don't want to spend toomuch time on biographical details, because this is a book about my games, soI will be content with a brief sketch. I was born on 11th December 1969 in Chennai (Madras), and learnt chess atthe age of six from my mother. A year later I joined the TaJ. Chess club in Chennai. A couple of years later I went to Manila when my father had an as­ signment there and got caught up in the Philippines chess fever resulting from the 1978 Karpov-Korchnoi World Championship match. Returning to India,it was not until 1983 that I achieved a real breakthrough. In that year I won both the national Sub-Junior (under- 16) and Junior (under- 19) titles, and qualified for the (adult) national championship. The championship itself was held the following year, and I finished fourth. In 1985 I gained my Inter­ national Mastertitle;at the time I was the youngest Asian ever to achieve this distinction. In 1986 I won the National Championship and became India's youngest champion. The following year, 1987, was special. After having played three times be­ forein the World Junior Championship, finishing lOth,5th and 7th, I finally won this title. In December of the same year I became the world's youngest grandmaster (at that time). In July 1990, I broke through the 2600 barrier. In the same month, I quali­ fied for the Candidates from the Manila Interzonal. The first round of the Candidates was held in January 1991, and I won my match against Dreev, but in the quarter-finals I lost narrowly to Karpov in a match that hingedon the fi­ nalgame. After this disappointment, I concentrated on tournament play with somesuccess: I won outright at Reggio Emilia 199 112 (ahead of Karpov and Kasparov) and in Moscow (November 1992). In 1993 I qualified for both the FIDE and PCA Candidates cycles. The fol­ lowing year I was successful in the PCA Candidates cycle, defeating first Ro­ manishin and then Adams to reach the Final of the Candidates. In the FIDE cycle I was less fortunate, losing to Kamsky after having been two games up with three to play. In early 1995 I defeated Kamsky in the Final of the PCA Candidates and gained the right to face Kasparov for the PCA World Championship in New York. As everybody knows, I started well but faded in the second half.
  6. 6. 6 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS However, losing this match was not the end of the world and in 1996 Iwas back on the tournament trail, finishing joint first with Kramnik at Dortmund and beating Kasparov in the Final of the Geneva Quickplay. However, the most important event of 1996 had nothing to do with chess: on June 27th I married Acuna in Chennai. 1997 was a successful year. In April I finishedjoint first with Kramnik at Dos Hermanas and in May I became the first person to win the Amber tour nament in Monaco twice. There followed a win in the Frankfurt Rapid, sec­ ond place in Dortmund and outright first in Biel. Finally, I tied for first place with Ivanchuk at Belgrade in November. At the end of 1997 I participated in the FIDE World Championship held at Groningen, and since I qualified for the final at Lausanne this event spilled over into 1998. I reached the final against Karpov, but then tiredness took its toll and, despite a 3-3 result in the match itself, I lost the tie-break. Despite this early disappointment, 1998 was my most successful year up to that time. I won the chess Oscar, and took first place in five major tournaments at Wijk aan Zee, Linares, Madrid, Frankfurt and Tilburg. 1999 started well, since I scored +6 at Wijk aan lJ!e to finish half a point behind Kasparov, but the rest of the year was rather disappointing. The prob­ lems started at Linares, where I lost a crucial game to Kasparov. Whether this was the sole cause is hard to say, but at any rate I struggled with my form for several months thereafter. The new millennium began with a modest success at Wijk aan ZJ!e, Where I finished joint second, but once again Linares proved discouraging. How­ ever, from this point on my form rapidly improved, and my play regained the freshness and vigour which had been the foundation for my run of succes in 1998. First I won the advanced chess event in Leon and the Frankfurt rapid, and then I was joint first at Dortmund. A further win in the FIDE World Cup in Shenyang left me in excellent shape for the crucial event of the year- the FIDE World Championship. This time there was no disappointment at the last hurdle, and I achieved my greatest triumph to date with a decisive 3112-'h victory in the final against Shirov. Now I will sign off and leave the readers to enjoy the games. Vishy Anand Collado. Spain June 2001
  7. 7. Game 1 V. Anand - V. lnkiov Calcutta 1986 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer 1 e4 cS 2 lLi3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 �d4 .!M6 s 00 � 6 i.gS e6 7 'l'd2 i.e7 8 0-0-0 0-0 9 ll:lb3 In 1986 this move was in vogue thanks to the efforts of Mikhail Tal. 9 aS 10 a4 dS 11 i.bS A move first played in Tal-Sis­ mega, Taxco Interzonal 1985, even though Tal ascribes the move's in­ vention to Vitolin�. Tal won that game and scored an even greater success when he beat Korchnoi with it at the 1985 Montpellier Candidates Tour­ nament. I figured that I could do worse than to follow in Tal's foot­ steps. 11 ll:lb4 Sisniega played l l...lt:lxe4 and Kon:hnoi l l...dxe4. l l...i.b4 is an­ other possibility; after 12 exd5 exd5 13 'l'f4, followed by exchanges on c3 and f6, both sides will end up with fract.•red pawn structures, but it will be difficult for Black to get at White's c-pawns, whereas White will attack the d5-pawn. The move l l...ll:lb4had been played before, in Vitolins-Inkiov, Jurmala 1985. 12 l:the1 (D) 12 .•. dxe4 After 12...'illc7 13 e5 ll:le8 14 ll:ld4! Black is in a bad way. Due to the weakness of the e6-pawn, Black can't play ...f6 and his e8-knight is badly placed. 13 'ii'xd8 Really the first new move of the game. Vitolins played 13 ll:lxe4lllxe4 14 11rxd8 �xg5+ 15 'ii'xg5/t:xg5 16 h4, regaining the piece with an un­ clear position.
  8. 8. 8 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 13 ... l:l.xd8 Mter l 3.....txd8 14 lllxe4 ..te7 (l4...lllxe4 15 ..txd8 lllxf2 16 l:l.d2 is very promising for White; Black has no reasonable defence to the threats of 17 ..txa5 and 17 ..te7) 15 lllxf6+ ..txf6 (l5 ...gxf6 16 ..th6 is similar to the game) 16 ..txf6 gxf6 17 l:l.d6 Black can play neither ...b6 nor ...e5, and so has serious prob­ lems developing his queenside. 14 lllxe4 lllbd5 (D) 15 c4 Apositionally ugly move, but the main thing is to exploit White's lead in development. To this end, White must keep the d-file open. 15 - !i:Jc7 15...lllb4 occupies the 'hole' cre­ ated by White's previous move, but then 16 l:l.xd8+ ..txd8 17 l:l.d 1 ..te7 18 llld6 e5 ( l 8...b6 19 ..te3! also nets a pawn) 19lllxc8 l:l.xc8 20lllxa5 wins a pawn. 16 l:l.xd8+ ..txd8 17 l:l.d1 Everything with tempo. 17 ..te7 (D) 18 ltlxf6+?! White retains the advantage after this move, but Black could have put up more resistance. It was probably stronger to play 18 llld6!. I would not claim that this is a forced win (Larsen once observed that all long variations are wrong!), but Blackis definitely in real trouble: l ) 18...b6 19 ..tc6! (not 19 ..te3 because now Black can reasonably play 19...lllxb5! with a satisfactory position after either 20 cxb500! or 20 axb5 transposing to line 2a be· low) 19...l:l.b8 20 ..tf4! and White's pieces occupy dominating positions. 2) 18...lllxb5 and now there are two possible lines: 2a) 19 axb5 b6 (best; 19...a420 llla5! and 19...h6 20 ..txf6 ..txf6 2 1 lllc5 are more promising for White) 20 ..te3 a4 21 llla 1 llld5! 22 cxd5
  9. 9. ANAND - INKIOV, CALCUITA 1986 9 .bd6 23 dxe6 i.e? 24 exf7+ �xf7 with fair compensation for the pawn. 2b) 19 cxb5! (this concedes the d5-square, but Black can't make full use of it) l9... b6 20 ltlc4 (20 i.e3 �!as in line l) 20... llb8 21 ltld4 (intending lLlc6) 2 I ...i.b7 (2l...i.d7 22 ltle5 is also good for White) 22 l0xb6 i.xg2 23 ltlc4! (although Black has the two bishops, the mass of pawns on the queenside is the most important factor in the posi­ tion; 23 ltld7 is less accurate since after 23...llc8+ 24 �bl i.e4+ things are getting quite messy) 23...llc8 24 b3 (White only needs to play �b2 and ltlxa5 to decide the game with his queenside passed pawns; how­ ever, Black can try to win a pawn) 24...i.d5 25 �b2! i.xc4 26 llcl ! (when I checked this position with Fritz, it saidthat Black was winning! Surprised, I looked to see why) 26...:C5 (this is the reason, but after some thought I found a solution) 27 llxc4 llxg5 28 :lc8+ i.f8 29 b6! (Black is helpless) 29.. .:c5 (after 29... ltld7 30 b7 :ld5 31 ltlc6 Black has no defence to both 32!De7+ and 32 :ld8) 30 b7 ltld7 31 ltlb5! and Black cannot meet the threat of 32 :ld8. 18 gxf6 19 i.e3 lLlxbS 20 axbS fS! Black fights back. This gives his bishop some air and prevents White forcing the exchange of bishops by i.c5. 20... e5 is worse, as after 21 i.c5 i.xc5 22 ll:lxc5 i.g4 23 lld5 :lc8 24 b3 Black's queenside pawns are in trouble. 21 &s (DJ The alternative 21 f4 ambitiously attempts to squash Black, but he can free himself by sacrificing a pawn: 2l...e5! 22 i.c5 (22 fxe5?! i.e6 23 li:ld2 a4 prevents White supporting his c4-pawn by b3, and then the c4- pawn itself is attacked by ...i.b4 and ...:lc8) 22...i.f6 (not 22...i.xc5?, when 23 ll:lxc5 gives White exactly what he wants) and now 23 fxe5 fails to 23...i.g5+ 24 �c2i.e6 and Black is doing well as White cannot hang on to all the pawns (for instance 25 �c3 :lc8, followed by some combi­ nation of ...a4 and ... b6). 21 ••• eS? The best defence was 2l... f4! 22 i.d4, and now: I ) 22...e5 23 i.xe5! i.xc5 24 lld8+i.f8 25i.d6 andWhite wins.
  10. 10. 10 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 2) 22.. .a4 (by not allowing lt:la4, Black gets some counterplay) and now: 2a) 23lt:ld3 i.d7 (23...f6? is very good for White after both 24 i.c5 and 24 tt:lxf4 e5 25 tt:ld5) 24 tt:lxf4 .:.C8 25 i.c3 i.e8 and Black has suf­ ficient counterplay. 2b) 23 tt:le4 f5 (23...e5? 24 i.xe5 i.e6 25 c5) 24 i.c5 and White re­ tains some advantage. 3) 22...f6 (a solid and sensible defence; Black prepares ...e5 fol­ lowed by ...�f7) 23 tt:la4! e5 24 i.c5 �n 25 i.xe7 �xe7 26 tt:lb6 .Z:.b8 with a slight advantage for White. Thus 2 l...f4, while not equaliz­ ing, would have restricted White's advantage. The importance of driv­ ing the bishop to d4 becomes clear after the text-move. 22 tt:ld7! From this excellent square the knight virtually paralyses Black's whole army. The game is already al­ most over. 22 f4 Too late, as now the bishop need not block the d-file. 23 i.b6 f6 24 i.c7! Since 25 tt:lb6 is threatened, Black can no longer delay capturing the knight; the result is that White's rook occupies the seventh rank. 24 i.xd7 25 lbd7 i.cS 26 i.d6 i.xd6 White also wins after 26...i.�f2 27 :xb7 :ds 28 :bS! (not 28c5? i.xc5 29 i.xc5 .Z:.c8) 28..J[xb829 i.xb8 �f7 30 i.e? and the threatof 3 1 b6 forces Black to approach with his king, whereupon 3 1 i.xa5 gives White an overwhelming mass of passed pawns. 27 :xd6 (D) Black's position is lost. The active rook, combined with White'squeen­ side pawn majority, guarantees a straightforward win. 27 28 b3 29 �b2 30 �xb3 a4 axb3 � Just abandoning the b-pawn, but 30...f5 31 :d7 :bs 32 c5 is also hopeless. 31 :d7+ �e6 32 lbb7 e4 33 :a7 e3 34 fxe3 fxe3 35 �c3 :ds
  11. 11. 36lW 37 bC'i! 38 b7 39 �b4 ANAND - INKIOV. CALCUTTA /986 40 b81t' 41 1tb7+ 42 'i!t'dS+ 43 c5 lba2 �d3 �e2 1-0 11 The 1987World Junior Championship was a breakthrough for me. It was already my fourth World Junior Championship; 1 had played in every one since 1984, finishing lOth in my first appearance, 5th in 1985 and 7th in 1986, a fairlyzigzagging pattern. Istarted the 1987 event in fairly good shape but I drew 3out of my first 4 games, and at that point I didn't imagine that I mightwin the tournament However, the following game was a turning point.
  12. 12. Game 2 V. Anand - K. Ninov World Junior Championship, Baguio City 1987 Sicilian, Kan 1 e4 cS 2 lbf'3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 liJxd4 a6 s �d3 �cS 6 lbb3 fLa7 7 lbc3 lbc6 8 'ife2 d6 9 h3 �xe3 As a result of this game, playel'll with Black started delaying this ex­ change so as to leave the white queen on e2 and thereby prevent the �e2 line mentioned in the note to Black's 13th move. In time, this led to the development of a whole new branch of opening theory. 10 'ifxeJ lbf6 (D) w 11 g4! I found this innovation over the board. PreviouslyWhitehad contin­ ued I I 0-0-0, butafter 11...0-0White either has to prepare this advance withllhgl, or play g4 as a pawn sac­ rifice. The idea behind the immedi­ ate g4 is quite simple: if you play it when g7 is undefended, then it isn't a sacrifice. 11 •.• bS Black thought for a while, and then decided simply to proceed with his qutenside counterplay. However, the tempo White saves by missing out llhgl is quite important, and he should have tried l l...lDxg4. After 12 'ifg3 lbf6 13 'ifxg7 llg8 14 'ifh6 �d7 Black will play ...'ife7 and both sides will castle queenside. How­ ever, when Black castles queenside in the Sicilian,White is better unless there is some mitigating factor,which is not the case here. Indeed, after 'ife3 by White there is an awkward weakness on b6 and the d6-pawn it· self may become vulnerable later. 12 0.0.0 0-0 13 gS lbe8 A poor square for the knight,but after 13...lbd7 14 �e2 Black has
  13. 13. ANAND - NINOV, BAGU/0 CITY 1987 13 immediate problems with his d6- pawn, due to the exchange of dark­ squared bishops and White's extra tempo. Usually White doesn't go af­ ter d6 in a Sicilian, but that doesn't mean you should forget about the possibility altogether! After the text-move, there is no point to :bgl, which would throw away the advantage gained as a re­ sult r:i White's innovation, so White has to come up with an alternative attacking plan. One possibility is h4-h5 followed by:dgl. Thearrangement with rooks on gl and hi is very desirable, be­ causetheywillbreak through almost any kingside defence, but it is very time-consuming to set up. Unlike many similar positions in the Sicil­ ian, Black's queenside counterplay is rather slow here, which is the only reason White can consider this plan, but in the end I decided on a more conventional approach. 14 f4 b4 15 lDe2 15 � would be a more posi­ tional formula. White stops ...a5-a4 and threatens to invade on b6. After l5...llb8White can continue 16 e5, in order to clear the c5-square for the Imight However, I preferred to play for the attack, and for that the knight is needed on the kingside. 15 aS 16 ltlbd4 ltlxd4 17 ltlxd4 (D) White has the advantage. Nor­ mally in the Sicilian, Black's the­ matic queenside pawn advance gains time because it hits minor pieces on b3 and c3, but here White has evacu­ ated these squares quite quickJy. Moreover, the knight on e8 is very badly placed for supporting the at­ tack. Just about the only useful thing it can do is to shore up the kingside by ...g6 and ...ltlg7. 17 ••• 'ilfb6 At the time I felt that Black should have gone in for 17...a4, but now I don't think so. The line that worried me was 18ltlc6 'iWc7 19 o!l'!xb4 a3 (if Black doesn't play this, then White plays a3 himself, followed by lilbl and c3, and Black will never break through) 20 b3 (threatening to cen­ tralize with 'il'd4) 20...'iWc3 (after 20...llb8 21 o!i)a6 .>.xa6 22 .>.xa6, followed by .>.c4, White's queen­ side position is solid since the poorly placed knight on e8 cannot displace
  14. 14. 14 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS White's bishop), but in fact 21 Wei! ifh2+ 22 'it>d2 is clearly better for White- Black has surprisingly little compensation for the pawn. These were still the pre-computer days, when players were much more intuitive. Nowadays everybody goes home and checks everything with Fritz. The use of computers has made people more sceptical and now they are more prone to go pawn-grabbing unless there is definite compensa­ tion. 18 eS .i.b7 19 mtfi(D) 19 dxeS Or 19...a4 (1 9...:d8 20 fS! is simi­ lar) 20 fS! dxeS (20...exfS 21 e6 is very good for White) 21 fxe6! (not 21 'ibeS :aS!) 2l ...exd4 221Fh3 g6 (22...fS 23 l:txfS! gives White a win­ ning attack) 23 exf7+:xt7 (23...�h8 24 'i'h6 �g7 2S :C6 wins) 24 :Xf7 �xf7 25 'i'xh7+ winning the black queen. 20 fxeS l:td8? (D) Allowing a pretty finish. 20... g6! was best, when White could con­ tinue21 �S 'llrxe3+ 22ll'lxe3 with a pleasant endgame-his knight could head for either f6 or d6. Still, Black has some chances by playing his knight to fS, and he shouldcertainly have gone for this. 21 .i.xb7+! �xb7 22 g6+ Once again Black suffers because of his miserable knight position Here it prevents Black from playing 22...fxg6. 22 ••• �g8 Or 22...'>1i>xg6 23 'i1Vd3+ (stopping ...�h7) 23...fS (23...�h6 24 'i'h3+ �gS 2S :gl + �f4 26 :del with mate next move) 24 exf6+ with ade­ cisive attack. 23 'i1Vb3 .!ffii 23...fxg61oses to 24 l:txfl!+ 'iPxfl! 2Sll'lxe6+. 24 exf6 (D)
  15. 15. 8 ANAND- NINOV, BAGU/0 CITY 1987 15 It isn't every day you see two at­ tacking pawns on f6 and g6! When you get a position like this, you go away feeling very pleased and have a warm glow for the next few games. 24 ••• fxg6 25 fxg7 1-0 Since 25...ii>xg7 26 ltlxe6+ and 25...llxfl 26 'l'h8+ �f7 27 :Xn+ are decisive. After this game, which was from round 5, there was a free day and the players went on an excursion. I still hadn't broken free from the pack. The following day, however, saw another good result. I was facing Agdestein, who at2565 was the highest-rated player in the tournament, although he was not the only grandmaster (Ivan Sokolov was also participating, although he was not very successful). Iprepared as well as I could because Agdestein is very unpredictable in the openings, and sat down hoping to play a good game.
  16. 16. Game 3 V. Anand - 5. Agdestein World Junior Championship, Baguio City 1987 Ruy Lopez 1 e4 tt'lc6 A provocative move. At the time it was felt that this move had little in­ dependent significance because so long as White knew he shouldplay 2 tt'lf3, Black had nothing better than 2...e5, thereby transposing into stan­ dard king's pawn openings. Subse­ quently it was discovered that Black could wind White up even more by playing 2...d6, but I don't trust this for Black! 2 tt'lf3 eS 3 i.bS a6 4 i.a4 b5 5 i.b3 tt'la5 Agdestein is fond of offbeat sys­ tems. I didn't know much about this one, although it is popular amongst Norwegian players. I could only re­ member a game between Spassky and Taimanov (in fact from the 1955 USSR Championship, held in Mos­ cow). Nevertheless, I was quite happy to see it on the board. White can play natural moves and there is not much risk even if he commits a slight inac­ curacy - a pleasant situation when facing the top seed! 6 0-0 7 d4 d6 tt'lxb3 8 axb3 f6 9 tDc3 i.b7 I recalled that Spassky had played lO tt'lh4 in the above-mentioned game, with dxe5, 11Vf3 and l:tdl fol­ lowing in some order, and that later. Spassky sacrificed a piece by means of lL!xb5. 10 tt'lb4 tt'le7 (D) 11 dxe5! dxe5 IfBlack plays 11...fxe5, then White can strongly reply 12 f4,opening the position up while Black's king is still stuck in the centre. However, taking back with the d-pawn retains control of gS, so that f4 can be met by ...exf4 followed by the fork ... gS· 12 1Wf3
  17. 17. ANAND - AGDFSTE/N, BAGU/0 CITY 1987 17 White avoids the exchange of queens as most of his chances lie in exploiting Black's poor develop­ ment and centralized king. 12 •.• 'i'd7 13 l:.dl 'i'e6 By now I had worked out that this was indeed what had happened in the Spassky game, and that he now continued with 14 i.e3. For a mo­ ment I wondered whatTaimanov had played that allowed the sacrifice on b5, then! realized that it was 14...g5. After 15 �xb5! axb5 16 W'h5+ 'ilf7 (16...�g6 17 �xg6 'l/lf7 18 l:.xa8+ .baS 19 1Wg4! also wins) 17 ltxa8+ .ixa818l:.d8+ �xd8 19 'ilxf7 gxh4 20 'l'xf6 White had a winning posi- lion. However, I was worried by the idea of 14...h5!?, intending ...'I'g4. I mulled over this for some time, but couldn't see an easy answer. If White plays 15 h3, then 15...g5 is now possible because White has no queen check on h5. If 15 li:ld5, then Black just castles queenside. It ap­ peared to me that if White was going to play 00, then it would be better to do it straight away, before Black bad time to set up the threat of ...'l'g4. 14 li:ldS li:lxdS If 14...0-0-0, then 15 c4 and White is already starting to make Black's king feel insecure. IS exdS 'l'f7 16 c4?! (D) A slight inaccuracy which gives Black the chance to sideline the knight on h4. 16 li:lf5 would have been more accurate, because White can play c4 at any time-Black can't prevent it. Then 16...g6 17 li:lh6 .ixh6 18 .ixh6 0-0-0 19 c4 ltd? would have led to a position in which White has an edge, since Black has no really constructive plan. 16 .ie7? Black misses the opportunity he has been given. 16...g6! would have left the h4-knight misplaced It is true that after 17 'l'e2 .ig7 18 f4 0-0 19 f5, follow� by 'l'e4, White has a good centralized position and Black's bishops are hemmed in. However, after 18...0-0-0!? Black would have chances of puhing his two bishops to work. The b7-bishop functions as a kind of 'Dragon' bishop, in that it makes it hard for White's attack down the a-file to strilce home prop­ erly. Moreover, playing cxb5 will
  18. 18. 18 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS leave d5 hanging.White is certainly not worse, but Black would have far more counterplay than he obtains in the game. 11 lbrs (DJ The exchange of inaccuracies has favouredWhite, because Black's in­ accuracy is actually quite serious - his bishop doesn't belong on e7 at all. NowWhite is clearly better. 17 ... J:d8 17...0-0 is impossible because of 18 ..th6. 18 ..te3 g6 (D) More or less forced, because oth­ erwise Black lacks a constructive move. 18...0-0? still fails to 19 ..th6 while after l8.....tc8 White has a choice of promising lines: l) l9l:ac l 0-0 20 lbxe7+(not20 cxb5 ..txf5 21 'i'xf5 axb5 22 J:xc7 J:xdS! andBlack escapes) 20...'i'xe7 21 cxb5 J:fe8 22 b6 cxb6 23 ..txb6 J:d7 24 'i'd3! ..tb7 25 d6givesWhite a clear advantage. 2) 19 c5! (even more forcing) l 9.....i.xf5 (19...0-0 20 d6 wins a piece) 20 11Vxf5 :Xd5 21 'l'c8+and after 2l.....td8 2211fxa6 or 2I...l:d8 22 J:xd8+ ..i.xd8 23 l:ldl 'ife7 24 1!fxa6 White wins a pawn while re. taining a positional advantage. 19 lbh6! White could exchange on e7, but then Black's king could castle or moveton and he wouldhavefair de· fensive chances.White's qu.enside majority is an asset, but it will not win the game by itself because the c-pawn is tied to the defence of d5. Instead, I wanted to keep Black's king on e8, while I broke through on the c- and d-files. 19 'fig7 Intending ...f5, when the knighl might be in trouble. 20 'l'g3?! This move, introducinglbf5 ideas, is not so strong as I imagined during the game. Sometimes, when you
  19. 19. ANAND - AGDESTE/N, BAGU/0 Crrr 1987 19 havea good position, the temptation is justto play easy, comfortable moves and wait for the position to win it­ self. Thecorrectmovewas 20 cxb5!, when 20...axb5 fails to 21 :a7. Dur­ ing the game I rejected it because of 20...f5 21 bxa6 .i.a8, with the threat of ...f4. However, with ten years' hindsight I don't see Black's com­ pensation for the two pawns. In par­ ticular,once White has played a7 the bishopon a8 willeffectively be dead, sincetaking on d5 will always allow a combination involving the promo­ tion of the a-pawn. One line is 22 'tlh3! f4 23 .i.d2 .i.g5 24ll:lg4 h5 25 �xe5 and wins. It is worth noting that 20 h4 was playable. After 20....ic8 we trans­ pose into the game, but White has saved a couple ofmoves. 20 ... .i.c8 Threatening ...g5, soWhite's next move is forced. 21 h4 .id6 (D) If Black attempts to play actively by 2I...f5 22 .i.g5! f4 then: I) 23 'i'c3 b4 24 'ilfd2 (24 '6'f3 .txg5 25 hxg5 'fle7 26 ll:lg4 '6'xg5 27 �xe5 0-0! is unclear) 24....txg5 25 hxg5 'i'e7 26 .l:tel �f8! and Black has counterplay. 2) 23 •h2!. A paradoxical move which nails down Black's kingside. Now White simply threatens :el followed by doubling or even g3 (meeting ...f3by g4). However Black continues_ his e5-pawn will come under fire and his king is trapped in the centre. The point of .wt-.2 is that after 23....i.xg5 24 hxg5 '*le7 White can defend the g5-pawn and main­ tain his kingside bind. w 22 '*if3 Other moves are inferior, for ex­ ample 22 c5? .txc5 or 22 lLcl e4 23 .tf4 '*ixh6! 24 .txh6 .txg3 25 fxg3. Inthislatter lineWhite keeps a slight edge as the opposite-coloured bishops (which normally have a drawish influence)makeBlack's de­ fence a bit more difficult, whenthere are still a fairnumber ofmajorpieces on the board. However, I thought that keeping the queens on offered even more. The move 'lin is mainly to pre­ empt the threat of ...e4. Now that White has got the knight firmly en­ trenched on h6, he can proceed with :aci followed by c5 and d6. The manoeuvre '6'f3-g3-f3 may appear odd, but Black has also wasted time
  20. 20. 20 V!SHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS with the manoeuvres ...iLb7-c8 and ...iLf8-e7-d6. 22 iLe7 Black would like to play ..J:I.f8, but the immediate 22...l:l.f8 allows 23 c5, because after 23...iLxc5 24 i.xc5 the rook on f8 is hanging. So Black returns to e7, still preventing c5 and getting ready to play ...l:l.f8 next move. The net effect of both players' oscillations has been to add the moves h4 and ...iLcS, which benefits White. At this stage I felt that my posi­ tion was very comfortable, but I had (and still have) a great deal of re­ spect for Agdestein and I wasn't counting on victory yet. 23 l:l.acl Retaining the option of either cxb5 or c5 followed by d6. 23 ••• bxc4 Agdestein finally decides to re- move the cxb5 option. 24 bxc4 :t8 25 c5 f5 26 iLgS iLxgS 27 hxg5 'ii'e7 28 'l'g3! (D) White had a more complex alter­ native in 28 d6 'ii'xg5 29 'l'c6+ i.d7 (29...l:l.d7 30 'ii'a8! l:l.d8 31 :tel should win for White) 30 'ii'xc7 'l'xh6 31 c6. This would also have been quite promising, as Black would have to return the piece for one pawn, still leaving White with a dan­ gerous passed pawn. However, given that an effective, solid alternative existed, I preferred to play safe. In a way it is quite strange that White is not winning already, since Black's king is irrevocably since in the centre - not only call it not castle, but even f7 is denied to it. However, the reason is the knighton h6. It is of course doing a wonderful job, but when it comes to landing a killing blow in the centre,White is effectively a piece down. 28 f4 29 'ii'h4 e4 30 d6 'ii'eS! The best chance. After 30...cxd6 31 cxd6 'ii'e6 (3l ...'l'e5? 32 llxcS!) 32l:l.c7 e3 (32...iLd7 33 �g4) White can continue 33 fxe3 fxe3 (after. 33...'1'xe3+ 34 �hl there is node· fence against 35 :te l) 34 'l'c4!l:l.f2 35 'ii'xe6+ iLxe6 36 l:l.e7+ �f8 37 l:l.xe6 with an extra piece. 31 dxc7 llxdl+ 32 :Xdl (D)
  21. 21. ANAND - AGDESI"EIN, BAGUIO CITY 1987 21 32 e3? Blackdecidestocounterattack, but now White's win is fairly straight­ forward. Black's only chance was 32...Wxc7, when we can see that it is not so easy for White because his knightisonh6.Ifit were on any nor­ mal square then, for example, lZc3 or �4. heading for d5 or d6, would be decisive. Nevertheless, after 33 ll:lg4 (heading for f6) 33...i.xg4 34 Wxg4 :tf5 35 b4! (White needs to pause for this move; it strengthens c5 andindirectlysupports:td6; after 35 'l1Ve2lhc5 36'liV:u4+Wt7White's attack has got a bit stuck) White has a large advantage. He intends 11'e2 and :td6, taking aim at e4 and a6, when Black's exposed king causes continuingproblems.lf35...e3, then 36 fxe3 fxe3 37 11Fe4+ picks up the e3-pawn (37....:.es 3S 'IlVaS+ �7 39 'iiVhS is even worse). 33 l:td8+ 'lie7 34 ltlg8+ lhg8 35 lhg8! ..te6 Or 35...e2 36 11'xh7+ 'lie6 37 .l:l.eS+and wins. 36 c811' 36'l1Vxh7+ J..f7 37 .l:l.eS+<lixeS 3S cS11'+ �7 3911'b7+ <lids 4011FhS+! is a prettier win, but I preferred the prosaic text. 36 ••• exfl+ 37 •xn! This game has been published in some magazines with the move 37 <lixf2, but thatallows mate in two!! 37 ..bc8 38 lhc8 1-0 This win over the top seed put me wellon the way tobecoming World Jun­ iorChampion.My run ofwins continued with further victoriesoverKlinger, Ivanchukand Blatny, after which I was in clear first place, aposition I heldon to until the end of the tournament. Winning the World Junior was my big breakthrough. Nonnally a player from India would have to waste a lot of time playing in mediocre open tour­ naments, gradually improving his Elo rating and hoping to get some invita­ tions. However, the two factors of my World Junior title and my GM title, which I gained shortly after this event, enabled me to short-circuit the pro­ cess. I got an invitation to a pleasant open tournament in Lugano (but after
  22. 22. 22 V!SHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS my play there, I didn't get invited again!). Then I was asked to bea commen­ tator at the World Cup event in Brussels (April1988). In Brussels I was able to meet some tournament organizers and this led to my first top-class invita­ tion- to Wijk aan Zee 1989. I had a tough year in 1988, just after gaining my GM title. I lost about 40 rating points in two tournaments at Biel and Blackpool- I still don't under­ stand why, although many GMs have told me that they had similar experi­ ences after gaining their title. I had a break after Biel and returned to active play near the end of the year at the Thessaloniki Olympiad, making 8lh points out of 12 games. This score was sufficient to regain 10 of the Elo points I had lost, but later I was surprised to discover that FIDEhad notgiven me any points at Thessaloniki. The reason, I found out, was that the Indiau team had arrived late, after the first round, and had therefore lost one match by default. FIDE had counted this as a normal loss, thereby wiping out my ten point gain from the rest of the event! Later on I had my ten points rein­ stated. I then scored 6/9 at the GMA Open in Belgrade and subsequently I played at Reggio Emilia, another good invitation resulting from my World Junior success. This tournament started well with wins against Ivanchuk and Sax, but after that I lost some games and finished on 4/9. However, this event was very useful for me; it was the first time that I had played such a strong field. My next event was the long-awaited trip to Wijk aan Zee. This was my first really big event and I was thrilled to be there. I had a zigzag course in the tournament. I won my first two games,just as at Reggio Emilia, then lost to Tseshkovsky (who used to be a nemesis of sorts!). lalso lost to Van der Wiel, but then won against Ivan Sokolov. I was still on '+I' when the following game was played in the penultimate round.
  23. 23. Game 4 V. Anand - J. Benjamin Wijk aan lee 1989 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer 1 e4 cS 2 lt:f3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 tt:lxd4 tt:lr6 s w tt:lc:6 6 �gS e6 7 'l'dl i.e7 8 0-0-0 0-0 9 tt:lb3 Two of the first fourgames in the bookreachthis position!I have done pretty well with this line so far. 9 •.• 'il'b6 By the time this game was played it hadbecomeclear that 9...a5 wasn't that great a move. 10 f3 IUS (D) 11 <!Jb1 There is an interesting story relat­ ing to this move. I used to get a lot of my theoretical infonnation from Ivanchuk. For example, during the 1985 World Junior Championship in Sharjah he had shown me a tremen­ dous idea in theDragon, whichturned an existing evaluation upside down; I was amazed (and thankful!) that he was so open and generous about showing his ideas to me. I would try to give him sometitbit in return, but unfortunately my novelties were not that good! At the Reggio Emilia event the month before Wijk aan Zee, there hadn't been much to do in the eve­ nings. so one day I went to Chucky's room. By this time he had recovered from his first round loss to me and was on a respectable score. He was also feeling bored; we went outfor a walkand then returned tohis room. I asked him "Why does everybody play the Catalan - it seems such a boring opening." He replied that it was not boring at all and proceeded to show me an interesting idea. The introductory moves were 1 d4 lilf6 2 c4 e6 3 tilf3 d5 4 g3 i.e7 5 .i.g2 0-0 6 �3 dxc4 7 lL!e5 c5 8 dxc5 and
  24. 24. 24 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS now Vassily said that 8. ..'ifc7 was supposed to be a good move. He ex­ plained that after 9 �xc4 'l'xc5... (D) ...everybody plays 10 'l'b3, but he had found a very strong idea: 10 b3!. The point is that after IO...:ds White can play 1 1 .llLa3 :Xdl+ 1 2 J:l.xd1 'ilt'c7 13 �b5 trapping the queen. I was very impressed by this line, which I had never seen before. He explained that this was the reason why ...'ilt'c7 was not good in this par­ ticular line of the Catalan, but was good in the similar lines in which Black plays ....llLb4 and later retreats the bishop to e7 in response to a3. The reason, of course, is that the pawn on a3 prevents the move i.a3. A nice idea, but apparently not much use to me as I didn't play the Cata­ lan. I hope Chucky will forgive me for revealing this piece of analysis! Returning to the Benjamin game, at this time I didn't really study the openings too deeply. I looked at all the theory, but didn't really go be­ yond that. After lO...:ds I suddenly didn't feel very happy with my posi. tion and couldn't fmd a continuation I felt comfortable with. Then I sud­ denly brightened up, becauseI sawa little trick after 11 q;,bI. 11 ••• ciS?! (D) If Black plays ll...a6, then 12 .i.e3 Wfc7 13 'ilf2 and White gains time owing to the threat of i.b6, so q;,b1 is really to provoke ...a6. Later on it was discovered thatthis doesn't really matter, because Black'scoun­ terplay consists of ...a6, ...lOfl and ...b5 in any case, but we didn't know that in 1989! After 11 Wbl Benjamin looked surprised, bKause he didn't under­ stand the point of the move. Perhaps he was thinking 'Vishy doesn't know that Black's threat is...d5'. , when he played ...d5 I checked my idea carefully, although there isn't much choice because after anything else White is clearly worse.
  25. 25. ANAND - BENJAMIN, WIJK AAN ZEE 1989 25 12 .hr6 dxe4? Benjamin falls for it hook, line and sinker. He could still have bailed out by 12...i.xf6 13 exd5 i.xc3 14 •xc3 exd5, although after 15 'il'c5 or 15 i.d3 White has some positional advantage. However, as he admitted after the game, he simply hadn't seen the idea at all. 13 i.xe7 Not 13 i.d4 .fud4 14 �d4 e5. 13 •.• :Xd2 14 lilxd2! (D) 14 exf3 After 14...lilxe7? White wins by 15 lllc4 'ilc7 16 lllb5 and Black's queen is lost almost exactly as in Iv­ anhuk'sCatalan idea. It isn't trapped here as it was in the Catalan, but the threat of mate on d8 means that it amounts to the same thing. At the next tournament where I met Ivan­ chuk, he came up to me and said "I see you used my idea in the Cata­ lan!". After the game Benjamin said that he wanted to resign at this point, but decided to play a few more moves; however, I then staned to play so badly that he couldn't bring himself to resign any more. 15 gill? Here's the bad move. Later I real­ ized that I5lilc4! would have won on the spot. 15...'1ff2 loses to I6lile4, and after 15...'1fc716 �d6 fxg217 �xg2'1Fd818�g3'1Fe719l:l.hel all White's pieces are active and his knights are going on a queenside rampage (lilb5 or llld5, coupled with ltld6). The factthatWhite has a lost a pawn is irrelevant. 15 ••• e5 16 �h4?! (D) Another mistake. 16 �a3 would have been much better, keeping con­ trol of key squares such as c5 and d6. In this case White shouldstill win in the long run, although thanks to White's previous error it is likely to be a laborious process.
  26. 26. 26 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 16 ... .te6 17 lMe4 White already has to take care: not 17 .i.c4? .i.xc4 18ltJxc4 'iWb4. 17 lM4 (D) 18 .i.g2?! After this, the position becomes rather murky, although it is possible that White can still retain an advan­ tage by accurate play. 18 .i.f2 was a much safer way to prove that White is better. 18 ••• .l:c8 Suddenly I couldn't find a line that worked for White. The threat is ...f5 followed by ....l:xc3, and it isn't easy to find a good defence. Finally I found a line that seemed to work for White but I was very nervous be­ cause Black has all his pieces aimed at White's queenside. 19 .i.f2 fS! 20 f4! Not 20 ltJg5? .l:xc3 21 ltJxe6 1Wxe6 22 .i.xd4 (22 bxc3? 1Wb6+ and Black wins) 22...exd4 23 bxc3 dxc3 24 q;>a1 11te2! (24...'itb625l:lbl 'iff2 26 .i.fl 11txc2 27 .i.c4+ followed by :Xb7 wins for White)25.l:hgt11txc2 26.1:bl1ltd2 27 a3 and Black is even slightly better. B 20 fxe4 21 fxeS (D) 21 ••• :C4 2 l ....l:d8! would have made life much harder for White: 1) 22 ltJe2? .i.xa2+ 23 �xa2 'li'a6+ wins for Black. 2) 22 .l:he1?! .i.g4! 23 .l:d2'1116! 24 .i.e3 (24 .l:xd4 .l:xd4 25 .i.xd4 'Wd2 favours Black) 24...Wh4 25 .i.f2 with a draw by repetition. 3) 22 .l:d2! .i.f5 (not 22...ltJb3? 23 axb3 and White wins) 23 .i.e3! 'ilrg624 :hd 1 and, surprisingly, there is little Black can do to prevention followed by taking on d4. While 2I. ...:I.d8 might not have been any better than the text-roove against perfect play, 22l:td2! and 23
  27. 27. ANAND - BENJAMIN, WIJK AAN ZEE 1989 27 .A.e3! aren't easy moves to find over lhe board. 22 l:tbel? (D) Missing 22 &2! l:l.a4 (Black's sacrificialattempts fail, for example 22...'l'xb2+ 23 �xb2 l:txc2+ 24 �al �xe2 25 i.el or 22...l:l.xc2 23 bd4 'il'c6 24 �4 and White wins in both cases) 23 b3! l:txa2 (if 23....1xb3, then simply 24 axb3) 24 .1xd4 and wins. B 22 ••• .11b4? Benjamin was in time-trouble by now, and commits another mistake. The best line was 22....ig4! 23 .!:d2 (not 23 l:txd4? l:txd4 24lt:lxe4 l:txe4 25 .1xb6l:txel#) 23...'fih6! 24lt:lxe4 (or 24 :Xd4 l:txd4 25 i.xd4 'ilt'd2) 24...�6 and Black has avoided los­ ing a piece. Despite Black's slight material advantage, I don't think White is orse, since B ack' k fairly exposed and his pieces dis­ jointed. 23 '.tel! It would also have been good to play 23 b3!, which looks a bit para­ doxical as Black has so many pieces ready to sacrifice on b3. However, after 23....i.xb3 24 axb3 l:txb3+ 25 <t>cl White should win. 23 ... i.g4 If 23...lt:lb3+ then 24 axb3 1Wxf2 25 lld8+ �f7 26 :n picks up the queen. 24 .!bdS 'ilt'cS 25 lt:lxb4 .i.xdl 26 �xdl! (D) Not 26 l:l.xdl? �e2+ and Black wins, nor 26 l:txe4lt'lb3+! 27 <t>xdl 'ilt'xf2 28 axb3 'ilt'xg2 29 l:te2 and only Black can be better. After the text-move it suddenly dawned on me that I was completely winning. I had been struggling to contain Black's queenside initiative for so many moves that the realiza­ tion caught me by surprise! 26 e3 26...'ili'xb41oses to 27 l:txe4.
  28. 28. 28 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS r1 lhe3 lMS 28 �dS+ An important intermezzo. 28 .l:tf3 is amistake because of 28...'i!fxb4 29 :Xf5 W'g4+. 28 � Forced; 28...Wh8fails to 29 l:l.c3 29 .:tf3 'il'xb4 30 .:txfS+ WeB 31 e6 1-0 After 31...11Vxb2 32 �c5 it is all over. Before the last round I was in a tie for fiCSt place with Nikolic, Ribli and Sax. I had the feeling that a draw in the last round would be enough to main tain the status quo, and indeed when my game with Douven ended in a draw my feeling turned out to be justified, as the other leaders also drew.Thus we ended up in a four-way tie for first. It was my first success in one of the world's major international events. In 1989, Bessel Kok, thechairman of SWIFf and agreatchess benefactor, organized a Youth vs Veterans event in Cannes not long afterWijk aan Zee.lt was held in conjunction with the annual Cannes Games Festival and was a very enjoyable event. The veterans were Tal, Spassky, Andersson, Csom and Larsen; the youth team consisted ofLautier, Renet, Adams, Miralles and my­ self. As the only GM in the youth team, I was acconunodated in an excellent hotel; indeed, the conditions at this event were the best I had experienced un til then.
  29. 29. Game 5 M. Tal - V. Anand Youth vs Veterans, Cannes 1 989 English I met MishaTal forthe first time when I visited theWorld Cup tournament in Brussels in 1988. He was the most popular player by far, captivating every­ one with his personality and his brilliant chess. This was my first game against my childhood hero and I was obviously quite excited. 1 c4 cS 2 ltl£3 lt:c6 3 00 lt:d4 How do you explain a move that violates the rule not to move the same piece twice in the opening? Well, I can't really find a general principle thatjustifies it, but it does seem to work! One possible expla­ nation isthat when White recaptures onf3 with his queen, he has lost con­ trol ofthe important d4-square. Then Black can bring out his other knight via h6 and f5 to fight for d4. Inany case, 3...�4 is a provoca­ tive move which leads to a more un­ balanced type of position than is usual in the Symmetrical English. 4 e3 lt:xf3+ S 'i'xf3 g6 (D) 6 b3 Or 6 d4 .i.g7 7 dxc5 (after 7 'Wd1 �f6 White will have to play d5 and then lose a tempo with e3-e4 in order to get his customary space advan­ tage) and now: 1) 7... 'i'a5 8 e4! 'i'xc5 9 lt:d5! (stronger than 9 .i.d3 .i.xc3+ 10 bxc3 d6) with a slight advantage for White. 2) 7....i.xc3 +!? 8 bxc3 11fa5 9 e4 11fxc5 10 .i.d3 d6. Normally Black should not give up his bishop like this in an 'Indian structure', but due to White's doubled c-pawns this po­ sition should be compared with the Nimzo-Indian rather than the King's Indian Defence. Admittedly Black has already played ... g6, but it's not clear how White can exploit this.
  30. 30. 30 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 6 7 .i.b2 8 g3 9 .i.g2 Two years later, I beat Karpov with 9...llli'6; the tactical justifica­ tion is that 10 liJd5 .i.g4! equalizes immediately. Actually, it is much more natural than 9...ltJh6. Whatever can be said about the objective mer­ its of 3...liJd4, I scored 212 against Tal and Karpov with it! 10 'ild1 0-0 1 1 0-0 .i.d7 To supportthe ...b5 advance. 12 a4 After 12 d4?! Black's plan of ex­ erting pressure·on d4 comes to frui­ tion: 12...cxd4 13 exd4 llli'5! 14 d5 (14 liJd5 b5! gives Black the edge) 14...b5 ! with good counterplay. B 12 .i.c6 13 d4 .i.xg2 14 �g2 (D) 14 l:l.c8 After 14...cxd4 15 exd4 ltJf5 16 d5 a6 17 l:l.bl ! the position is slightly better for White. He has a space ad­ vantage and a weak black e-pawn to play against On the otherhand, his pieces on the queenside are awk­ wardly placlld. 15 'ild3?! Tal latermentionedthe possibility of 15 d5! and this move does seem to offer White a stable if minuscule edge. Black will hardly be able to achieve ...b5 and playing ...c7-e6 would create weak pawns on e6 and d6. 15 - ad4 16 exd4 lllrs NowBlackis fine. 17 d5 (D) After 17 lDe2d5 18 c5 a5 Black is slightly better. White's queenside pawns are crippled and the pawn on d4 is weak. White's best line was probably 17 �d5! e6 18 ltle3, just playing for the exchange of knights and equality. B
  31. 31. TAL - ANAND, CANNES 1989 17 1fb6 25 c5 31 The reason why 'ifd3 was bad - There is no other defence against b3 is undefended. 25...ll:ld4. 18 t0d1 i.xb2 25 ••• 'ifxcS 19 <fub2 eS! 26 'ffxb7+ .l:.c7 Now Black is justified in playing 27 'lfdS 'ffb4 actively. The open f-file counts for Not 27...'1Vxd5+'? 28 l:txd5 l:tc2 morethan Black's slightly weak cen- andWhite can hang onwith29 ll:lc4. tral pawns. 28 lUd1 .l:.cS 20 dxe6 Exploiting the weakness of b3. Forced. If White doesn't do this, 28...ll:ld4 is less clear after 29 ll:lc4 Blackcan aim for...e4-e3. Moreover, l:tc5 (not 29...ll:lxb3'? 30 ll:lxd6!) 30 his knight can settle comfortably on 1Wa8. d4. 29 'IVai 20 ••• fxe6 If 29 ll:ld3'? then 29...ll:le3+! 30 21 :Sd1 ltt6 fxe3 11Vxd2+ winning the exchange. Preparing to double rooks on the 29 ... 'lixb3 f-lile. 30 ll:ld3 (D) 22 :d2 eS! (D) After 30 '1fxa7+ l:tf7 31 11t'a6 (3 1 23 11Fd5+ After 23 ll:ldI ltld4 Black wins a pawn as White has to meet the threat of 24...'i'c6+. 23 ... 24 'ltbs 'lfa8 l:tc2 is similar, e.g. 32 ll:ld3 'lic3 33 l:txc2 1Vxc2 winning material) 31...l:tc2! 32 ll:ld3 l:txd2 33 l:txd2 'lid5+ 34 �gl e4 White loses the pinned knight. 30 l:tc2?!
  32. 32. 32 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 30...l:l.c7! would have been bru­ tally effective- Black simply main­ tains his a-pawn and threatens both 3l ...'lWxa4 and 3 l...�d4. 31 'lWe4?! White could havemadelifeharder by playing 31 'lWxa7+ .l:l.f7 32 'lWa5 (D) (32 'liaS 11fc3! wins). I don't know ifTal spent much time consid­ ering this apparently greedy con­ tinuation. I must admit that it was only after some time checking the position with Fritz thatI began tore­ alize that Black's task was not so easy. Still, Black does have a way to win: 1) 32...e4'!! and now: Ia) 33 .l:l.xc2 'i'xc2 34 .l:l.d2 'ifc6 35 �b4 'ilfc3! wins for Black. lb) 33 �f4 'iff3+ (33...l:l.c5 34 1Wd8 is unclear) 34 �gl e3 looks strong, but after 35 fxe3 'ifxe3+ 36 �hI there is nothing clear-cut, for example 36...'iff3+ 37 �gl �d4 38 .l:l.el . lc)33.1Wb4! 1Wxb4 34 &b4 saves White. 2) 32...1i'h7+?! 33 �gl lbd2 34 1Wxd2 lDd4 35 �1 andWhite avoids disaster. 3) 32...l:rxd2 33 'lWxd2 (33 l:txd2? 1i'b7+ 34 �gl 'lWbl+ 35 �g2 ta3+ wins) 33...1Wxa4 wins a pawn, but there is still a long way to go. 4) 32...�3+! 33 fxe3 Vxd3 34 .l:l.xc2 ile4+ 35 �gl (35 �h3 :t'5! and there is no way to stop ...l:l.hS#) 35...11'xe3+ 36 �g2 'lWf3+ '57 Wh3 1rxdl and White's king is hope­ lessly exposed. 31 _ .l:l.c4 32 'lidS 1Wd Besides the extra pawn, the differ­ ence in strength of theknights can be seen. 33 .l:l.b2 :.14 34 .l:l.b7+ wh6 35 'lrbS (D) 35 'i6'gS loses to 35...'i6'c6+. 35
  33. 33. TAL - ANAND, CANNES 1989 33 36 <i>gl Or 36 fxe3 'l'c2+ 37 �h3 :h4+! 38gxh4:f3+ 39 �g4 'l'g2#. 36 -· 'fic2 37 lin llxd3 0-1 After 38 1i"d7 Black mates by 38...1Fxf2+!. I was very happy to win in Tal's own style, although I recognized that his poor play in this game was due to illness. In fact, he withdrew from the tour­ nament after the first half for medical treatment. Still, I am proud to have played at least one game against Misha Tal.
  34. 34. Game 6 V. Anand - B. Spassky Youth vs Veterans, Cannes 1989 Ruy Lopez, Breyer 1 e4 eS During the course of his career, Spassky has played just about every opening there is, but in recent years he has tended to stick to dual king pawn openings, so this was nota sur- prise. 2 ttlf3 ttlc6 3 �bS a6 4 �a4 ttlf6 S 0.0 �e7 6 l:e1 bS 7 �b3 d6 8 c3 0-0 9 h3 ttlb8 The Breyer Defence, for decades Spassky's main weapon against the Ruy Lopez. 10 d4 ttlbd7 11 c4 Round about this time there had been a modest revival in this old move. I felt that Spassky's knowl­ edge of the main lines would be much greater than mine, so I tried, with some difficulty, to find a rela­ tively unexplored continuation. 1 1 c4 enjoyed popularity in the 1960s and was probably no surprise, but at least it didn't have such a huge body of theory as 1 1 ttlbd2. 11 ••• c6 12 a3 This was an idea I came up with over the board At the time I hadno idea if it had ever been played be fore, but I have since found acouple of earlier games. The immediate 12 ttlc3 is met by1 2...b4. 12 ..• bxc4! The best reply. After1 2...b7 ll ttlc3 I think White is slightly better, since White's structure is a bit more comfortable in this type of 'Old In· dian' position. Black can of course continue with ..."Wic7, ...l:ac8 and so on, but White can gain more space with an eventual �a2 and b4. 13 hc4 (D) 8
  35. 35. ANAND - SPASSKY, CANNES 1989 35 13 ••• dS Black is not worse after the text­ move. but 13...li:lxe4 would have equalized straight away: I) 14 dxe5?d5 15 .i.xd5 cxd5 16 1l'xd5 l:lb8 (16...li:lxf2 may also be good for Black) 17 'ilfxe4 li:lc5 18 'lre2 ltlb3 19 l:la2 .i.e6 and White loses the exchange by force. 2) 14 :.Xe4 d5 with two possibili­ ties: 2a) 15 ltlxe5 (Spassky suggested this, but Black has an escape route) 15...dxe4 (not 15...li:lxe5 16 .i.xd5 cxd5 17 :XeS.i.d6 18 :eJ and White can behappy because, compared to theMarshall Attack, his piece devel­ opment is easier as ltlc3 is possible) 16 ltlxc6 'i'e8 17 .i.d5 .i.d6 18 ltle7+ 'i'xe7 19 .ba8 li:lb6 20 .i.c6 j,c7 (theexposedbishop on c6 gives Black's queen a free tempo on its wayto h2) 2I ltlc3 'i'd6! (21 ...f5 22 'i'b3+ �h8 23 'i'b4 is annoying for Black) 22 he4 f5 23 .i.f3 'i'h2+ 24 �fl l:le8 25 g3 f4 and White is cer­ tainly not playing for the advantage - indeed, Black is probably slightly better. 2b) 15 l:lel dxc4 16 'ilfe2 (after 16 dxe5 ltlc5 the outposts at d3 and b3 giveBlacktheedge) I6...:es with equality, as Black's weak pawns are balanced byhis active pieces. In fact thishad beenplayed as long ago as 1971, in the game HUbner-Lengyel from Wijkaan Zee. 14 exdS 14 dxe5? ltlxe4 transposes to line 1 of the previous note. 14 cxdS 15 .i.a2 e4 16 .!Des .i.b7 (DJ Here I was quite happy, as it seemed to me that my pieces were well placed to exen pressure on d5. While there is some truth in this, Black has so many pieces available to defend d5 that the inconvenience is not serious. 17 lLlcl li:lb6 By protecting d5, Black sets up various threats based on moving the f6-knight. The first is to expel the e5-knight by ...IDeS followed by ...f6, in whichcase he would proba­ bly be better. The second is the sim­ ple ...li:lfd7, when Black can ex­ changeon e5 without having aknight attacked after dxe5. Hence White must react quickly. 18 f3! l:lc8 19 .i.b3
  36. 36. 36 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS White could have maintained some slight pressure by 19 .ig5, as Spassky pointed out after the game. 19....ixa3? 20 bxa3 l:l.xc3 is bad af­ ter 21 .id2! l:l.c8 (2 1....:Xa3 22 .ib4 favours White) 22 .ia5 ! with a very awkward pin. 19 --· .ia8 20 .igS l:l.c7 Black's position is basically safe; for example he could have played 20...exf3 2 1 'i'xf3 �c4 with equal­ ity, and indeed this would have been the natural way to make use of ....ia8, which protected the bishop. 21 .:tel li:Jrd7 22 .if4 .igS (D) 23 .ixgS After 23 �xd7 the line 23 ....ixf4 24 �xb6 .ixcl 25 �xa8 .ixb2 (25...l:l.xc3 26 bxc3 is also very good forWhite) 26 �xc7 .ixc3 27 �xd5 .ixel 28 'i'xel exf3 29 gxf3 clearly favours White. However, Black can improve by 23...l:l.xd7! 24 .ixg5 1i'xg5 25 fxe4 dxe4 26 �xe4 'lg6 and he regains the pawn since 27 .ic2 fails to 27...f5. 23 -- 24 fxe4 'ifxgS dxe4 Black had a good alternative in 24...�xe5 25 dxe5 dxe4 andnow I) 26 2d4 �d7! (not 26...e3 27 l:l.e2 attackingb6 and e3) 27 .6 (not 27 �xe4?? .ixe4! and Black wins) 27...�e5 28 exf7+ �h8! 29 'ifd6 l:l.cc8 and Black has dangerous king side threats. 2) 26 e6. During the game, I be­ lieved this was good for White, but Black simply continues 26...'lc5+ 27 �hI fxe6 28 .ixe6+ Wh8 and the position is just unclear. The game continuation is also roughly equal. 25 'ifg4 'ifxg4 Black cannot get away with 25...'ifd2, when White must decide how to take on f7: I) 26 .ixf7+ (obvious, but this is in fact an error) and now: Ia) 26....:.Xf7 27 �xf7 li:i6 28 'i'e6 'ifxd4+ (28..Jbf7 29 'ifxb6 e3 30 �e4! wins) 29 �hi J:xf7 30 l:l.cdl and White is winning. l b) 26...�h8! 27 �xd7 (not 27 .:tedI ? ttlxe5 28 dxe5 'ifxb2 and Black wins) 27 ...'1Vxd4+ 28 �hi �xd7 with an unclear position. 2) 26 �xf7! �f6 (26...'i'xd4+ 27 Wh1 �c5 28 J:cdI 'li'f6 29 J:fl ! wins, whileafter26...'ll'xb2 27 'le6! Black is in considerable difficulties)
  37. 37. ANAND - SPASSKY. CANNES 1989 17 27 �g5+ 'it>h8 (27...�d5 28 'I'd! ! With aclear extta pawn) 28 'iVg3 and White is clearly better. 26 lllil:g4 g6? Black's first step downhill. After 26. ..�h8 27 it)e3 f5 Black activates his kingside majority, which should provide enough counterplay to main­ tain the balance. r1 �2! Wllite now wins apawn, although in view of the reduced material this does not necessarily guarantee win­ ning thegame. r1 ••. 28 d5 29 it)fxe4 :es �g7 lllil:dS (D) At first I couldn't believe this move; it looks as though White must win material after 30 .txd5 .txd5 31 liXI6, as Black will end up being threatened with �xd5 and lt:le8+. However, Spassky had worked out a defence. AfterI had calmed down, I did'nt see any way toforcea decisive material gain, so I just went for a pawn. 30 it)d6 30 .i.xd5 .i.xd5 31 �d6 is an­ sweredby 3 J...:Xel+ 32 :Xel :cs, meeting both ofWhite's threats. It is easy to miss that the c3-knight is no longer protectedtwiceand therefore b2-b4 is impossible. White can try 33 :e7 �e6 34 �f7 <M6 35 :Xd7 lhc3! 36 bxc3 .i.xd7 37 it)d6 �e5, but although he has won a pawn, Black's king becomes too active and he draws easily. 30 31 lbel 32 :e7 33 :xt7+ 34 �c4 J:x:el+ �f6 :c6 �h6 :e6 Black has managed to get some counterplay; White's f7-rook is sur­ rounded and Black can activate his king via g5. 35 'M2 36 �2 37 �dl �,s .tel» liS (D)
  38. 38. 18 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 38 �b3?! Thiswouldhave been the moment to settle for 38 l:tg7! �e5 (38...�e8 39 �de4+! Wh6 40 l:th7+! Wxh7 41 �g5+ leaves White aclearpawnup) 39 J:l.a7 and White's rook gets out of the trap! In fact this is quite awkward for Black as a6 is weak. Black's mass of pieces appears menacing, but White has all the critical squares controlled. The sacrifice 39...�eg4+ doesn't work here: 40 hxg4 �xg4+ 4 1 Wgl (but not 4 1 Wg3? h4+! 42 Wh3 l:te3+ 43 �f3+ .i.xf3 44 gxf3 l:txf3+ and Black wins) 41...l:tel+ 42 �fl defends. I thought that the text-move was even stronger, but I hadn't really seen Black's 39th move-in fact, I'm quite lucky that it doesn't cause seri­ ous damage! 38 39 l:ta7 llJes �eg4+! (D) This works because White can't play l2lfl any more. 40 hxg4 41 � 42 wgl 43 l:txa6 44 l:txe6? �g4+ � �c2 ..td7 Though this sets up the nice fin­ ish to follow, it is a mistake. Two knights can't win by themselves and there aren't that many pawn left ! White shouldhave played44l:ta5+!, followed by J:l.d5-d2. By keeping the rooks on, White has much better chances of pushing the queenside pawns and in fact he still has excel­ lent winning prospects. 44 ·- ..txe6 (D) 45 llJcS ..tc4 46 a4 Wf4? One reason why I exchanged rooks earlier was the combinnation which now occurs, butin the interim I had realized that46...'�•f5 prevents it: 47 a5 l2lb4 48 b3 iin 49 li:ld3 l2lxd3 (a forced move, as 49...li:la6 50 b4 iic4 51 l2lb2 is good for
  39. 39. ANAND - SPASSKY, CANNES 1989 39 White) 50 a6 .ie8 5 1 itld5 �e6 52 lOc7+ ci.>d6 53 itlxe8+ �c6 and the king catches the a-pawn. Therefore White has to settle for 47 'iii>f2, but Black has good drawing chances. 47 a5 Now we get to see an elegantfin­ ish - a lone knight dominating two minor pieces ! � ••• itlb4 48 b3 .if7 49 1Dd3+!! Spassky had only seen 49 a6?? w650itlxa6.ixb3 andWhite has no winning chances since he has only one pawn left. 49 50 a6 itlxd3 £e8 51 itldS+ 1-0 After 5 l ...'iii>e5 52 itle7 (D) the positiondeserves a diagram: Black can't stop the pawn - a nice bit of domination! In Cannes Imadethe bestscore in thejunior team, 61/2110, butthe 'Senior' Andersson made the best score overall, with 7112 points. ThenextgameisagainfromWijk aanZee, theyear after mysuccess in the 1989 event.
  40. 40. Game 7 M. Kuijf - V. Anand Wijk aan lee 1 990 Ponziani Opening 1 e4 e5 Round abouta month before Ihad beaten Kuijf in the tournament at Groningen. That game had been a Closed Sicilian, and at one stage it could have been very dangerous for me. This time I didn't want the same 'excitement' so I decided to play more solidly. Hence my choice of first move. 2 ll:lf3 ll:lc6 3 c3 A real surprise. 3 ••• lllf6 I played this move instantly and while he was thinking about his re­ ply I had to spend afew minutes try­ ing to remember the name of the opening! 4 d4 S dS I don't really understand what Kuijfwas aiming forwith his choice of opening. It is harmless and only useful ifWhite is aiming foradraw. 6 lOxeS ll:lg6 7 i.d3 However, this indicates that White is not aiming for a draw, towards which he could have made substan­ tial progress by 7 'iWe2 'fle7 8 'flxe4 (8 ll:lxg6?! hxg6 is a little betterfor Black) 8...'iWxe5 9 ll:ld2 (or alterna­ tively 9 1i'xe5+). 7 ... ll:lxeS 7...ll:lxf2? isn't even a difficult !rap:White wins by 8�xg6li:lxd1 9 i..xf7+�e7 10 i..g5+�d6 1 1 1iJc4+ �c5 12 i.xd8. 8 i..xe4 i..cS 9 1lfhs d6 10 i..gS? (D) 10 h3 was a much bettermove,aJ. though even in this case Black can play for an advantage. 10 i.g4! Black can play 10...'i'd7 11 0-0 'i'g4, with boring equality, but I had seen that the text-move is much
  41. 41. M. KUIJF - ANAND, WIJK AAN ZEE 1990 41 stronger. Technically, it may be a aovelty, but I am reluctant to call it that To my mind, novelties should be at least alittlebit difficult to find. If you play the most obvious move andthen discoverthatby an accident of history nobody has played it be­ fore, I am not sure that it deserves any special appellation. 11 111'h4? Losing on the spot. The lines l l 11fxh7 111'xg7 and ll 111'xg4 lLlxg4 12 ..ixd8 llixf2 l3 l:l.fl lLlxe4 14 ..ixc7 lc8 15 .ia5 b6 16 ..ib4 ..ixb4 17 cxb4 lc2 also offer White no hope. This leaves l l .ixd8 ..ixh5 12 ..ig5 (12 ..ixc7 l:l.c8 l3 ..ia5 b6 14 b4 ..ixf2+ 15 �xf2 bxa5 and 12 ..ih4 0-0 followed by l3 ...l:l.ae8 are also verypromising for Black) as the only realistic way for White to play on. Even here Black has a range of tempting options. He could simply playforthetwobishopsby l2.....ig6 13 llid2 llid3+, but 1Lf6 is proba­ bly stronger. Then 14 ..i£4 is impos­ sible, 14 ..ih4 leaves thebishop shut out on the kingside and 14 ..ie3 al­ lowsBlack to shatterWhite's pawns. Black could also consider l2...f6, wins ith sim Jar id 11 ... f6 Now White has no reasonable continuation. 12 ..ict After 12 ..id2 111'e7 l3 0-0 g5 White has the unpleasant choicebe­ tween: 1 ) 14 11'h6 00 15 1fg7 1l'xe4 16 l:l.el ..ie2 17 b4 ..ib6 18 ..ie3 <:Je7 19 l:l.xe2 (l9lDd2 1l'd3) l9...l:l.ag8 wins. 2) 14 1l'g3 f5 15 h3 (the only chance, or else ...f4 traps the queen) 15...f4 16 'llfh2 ..id7 and although material is even. White is playing a whole qu.en down for all practical purposes. After ...0-0-0 and a subse­ quent ...g4 the attack should over­ whelm White. If White retreats his bishop to e3 the lines are even simpler: 12 ..ie3 g5 l 3 11fh6 (l31l'g3 f5 14f4..ixe3 15 fxe5 ..if4 and Black wins) l3...11'e7 14 0-0 llif7 15 1l'g7 0-0-0 16 ..ixc5 l:l.dg8 17 l:l.el ..id7 and White loses his queen. 12 'fle7 (D) 13 0-0 'This is forcedto meetthethreatof ...ll:ld3+, because l3 f3 is met by l 3.....ixf3. 13 gS 14 'iWgJ rs
  42. 42. 42 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS The threat is ...f4, so White re- 17 � J:tg8 sorts to desperation. 18 l:!.ael h6 1S .hi'S 19 :XeS+ dxeS 15 h3 f4 16 'irh2 i.d7 shuts the 20 'IfxeS+ �d7 queen completely out of play and 21 i.e3 l:1ae8 Black wins by ...0-0-0 and a pawn 22 'i!Vr4 11Vxd5 push on the kingside. 23 lbr3 i.d6 1S .hi'S 24 'i!Fa4+ bS 16 i.xgS 'i!Ff7 0-1 This game was finished while some of the others were still in the opening; I spent ten minutes and my opponent a little under half an hour. It was a nice miniature to play in the first round, but the rest of the tourna­ ment didn't go as well as the year before. I lost in the second round to Nunn and continued unevenly throughout the event, finishing on 50%. Shortly after Wijk aan Zee, I played an open tournament in Rome. This started well, but I lost a miniature to Miles in the penultimate round and fin­ ished with 6/9. ThenI went back toIndia forsome rest before travelling to the Zonal tournament in Qatar. I was by far the highest rated player,but even so I was happy to win the tournament convincingly. As a result of this and some other tournaments I gained quite a lot of rating points, and on the 1st July 1990 list I stood at 2610-I hadbroken through the 2600banier. I took part in an open tournament in Manila, went back to India and then returned to Ma­ nila for the Interzonal. Based on my new rating I was certainly a potential qualifier, but in an Interzonal you cannot take anything forgranted - an Inter­ zonal is a tough tournament even for the top seeds. My results in the Interzonal followed a fluctuating course: I won in the second round, lost in the third, won in the fourth and lost in the fifth. After a draw with Chandler in the sixth round, I faced the Icelandic grandmaster Margeir Petursson in round 7.
  43. 43. Game S M. Petursson - V. Anand Manila Interzonal 1990 Queen's Pawn 1 d4 d6 2 c4 eS This was part of my usual open­ ing repertoire at the time. I liked l ...d6 because it is such a complete system in itself. If you play the Pirc thenyouhave no reason to fear 2 e4, and 2 lLlf3 can be met by 2.....1lg4. Since then, however, White has found ways tokeep some pressure.As are­ sult ! lost faith in the system and had tolearn a decent defence to I d4. 3 lLlc3 exd4 4 'l'xd4 ll:lf6 An important finesse. If Black plays � • . e:lc6,then 5 'l'e3+ is a little annoying as 5...il..e7 6 ll:d5 snares the two bishops. 5 g3 lLlc6 6 'ild2 g6 White's pieces are not badly placed - for example, the queen is quite useful on d2 ifWhite intends to play b3and il..b2.On the other hand, Blackhasgained atempo because of 'ilxd4 and 'ild2. 7 il..g2 8 lLlh3 9 lLlf4 il..g7 0-0 White is aiming to establish a grip on d5. He has played the opemng accurately, forexample by not play­ ing b3 too early, which sometimes allows a tactical ...d5! by Black. w 9 a5 (D) This is designed to prevent White from easily developing his queen's bishop, for if 10 b3, then IO...a4 I I llbl (11 lLlxa4 lLle4 wins the ex­ change, while II ..llb2 may be met by l l ...a3 1 2 i.e! i.f5 or l l ...ll:a5) 1l ...axb3 12 axb3 lle8, followed by ...i.f5, with active play. 10 0-0 l:le8?! A slight inaccuracy. IO...a4 was better, simply preventing b3. 11 l:lel?! White misses his chance. 11 e4 was correct, and after l l ...a4 12 llbl
  44. 44. 44 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS �5 l 3 b3 White has secured his queensidepawn structure. Ofcourse the immediate 1 1 l:l:b1 is answered by 1 l....if5. 11 •.• a4 12 l:.b1 llld7! A good move. By the time White has played b3, Black has arranged to occupy active squares with his knights. 13 b3 axb3 14 axb3 (D) 14 ... �eS! If 4...lt'Kie5!? (intending to play lS ...llld4) then 15 lllbS! is slightly better for White. It is the c6-knight whichbelongson eS, sothat theother one can occupy cS. 15 'l'c2 lllcS 16 b4? Premature, because with ener­ getic play Black now gets the better position. After the correct 16 .ib2 c6 we reach a position typical of the Fianchetto King's Indian. White has the centre, whilst Black has open lines forhis rooks and activesquares for his knights. Chances are about equal. 16 ... .irS! An important intermezzo. 17 e4 After 17 lbe4 llla4, followed by l 8...ltlc6,Black has excellent control over the long dark-square diagonal. 17 ... lt:le6! (D) Margeir had missed this tactic. 18 lllxe6 Black's play is tacticallyjustified by the variation 18 exf5 llld4 (·at tacking the queen and threatening 19...lbef3+) 19 1fe4 (19 'l'd1 li:lxf3 20 .ixf3 :Xe1+ 21 1Wxe1 li:lxfJ+ andBlack wins) 19...gxf5! (the queen is trapped) 20 1Wxb7 (20 11ie3 ltlc2) 20...:b8 with a clear advantage to Blackas White mustnowgive up his queen. If 18 .i.e3, then 18 ...i.g4 19 12lxe6 :Xe6 and f3 is very weak.
  45. 45. PETURSSON - ANAND, MANILA INTERZONAL 1990 45 18 ••. .be6 Now Black is much better; his pieces are active and the c4-pawn is weak. 19 �5 19 c5 dxc5 is very good for Black after:!J bxcH Vd3 ! or 20 J:[dl 'iVf6!. 19 bS! Winning the c-pawn and forcing White to search for some sort of compensation. 20 .tb2 (D) Not:!J cxb5? .txd5 21 exd5llJf3+ winning. 20 ... :.2! I prefer this to the line 20...llJxc4 21 .ixg7 �xg7 22 'iVc3+ f6 23 llJr4 c6! (23....tf7 24 e5 llJxe5 25 .txa8 1fxa8 26:e3 :cs intending ...c5 is unclear) 24 llJxe6+ :xe6 25 .tfl llle5. Here Black is a pawn up, but White has some compensation due 1D the weak queenside and the open 7th rank, which would enhance the strength of any rook penelration by White. Note that 26f4can be met by 26...'it'b6+ followed by 27...llJg4. 21 llJcJ :xb2! 22 :xb2 .txc4! Not 22...llJxc4 23 :a2 with an un­ clear position. Mter the text, Black has extremely active pieces and strong dark-squared pressure in re­ turn for his small sacrifice. The im­ mediate threat is 23...llJd3. 23 :eJ (D) After 23 J:[dl 'iVf6 24 llJd5 llJf3+ 25 .txf3 'iVxf3 White is pretty close to being lost. 23 .th6? A really awful move whereby, in one stroke, Black throws away all hisadvantage.Theproblem was that I was so excited about the way all Black's pieces were working well together that I forgot White could still develop counterplay. The cor­ rect line was 23...llJg4! 24 l:lf3 (24 J:[el .id4 25 'ifcl 'iff6 26 llJdl .i.xb2 wins)24....td425 'ifd2 c5, followed
  46. 46. 46 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS by 26...lbe5, and Black has a large advantage. 24 f4! More or less equalizing. 24 ••• lllg4 25 IU3 �g7 26 'l'dl 26 :tbl !? was also possible. 26 ••• "l'a8 27 h3 "l'a1+ (D) The tactics don't work for Black after 21..."tl'a1+ 28 �hl "l'al+ 29 :tbl �xc3 30 li'c2! 'l'a2 31 lhc3 'i&'xc2 32 l:l.xc2 �d3 33 hxg4 .bc2 34 .:tel �xe4 35 l:l.xc7 �xg2+ 36 >fi>xg2 .:te4 and the resulting rook ending is probably a draw in view of White's active rook position. I was quite surprised that Black had noth­ ing better in this line; with a King's Indian bishop and a knight rampag­ ing around, you expect something to work but in this case there was noth­ ing. 21 �n �xn 29 lW1 "ifa3 Once again White canhang on af­ ter 29..."i'a7+ 30 >fi>hl lbe3 by 31 llcl ! lllc4 32 :ta2'irb7 33 'Wd5!. 30 lU3 lbf6 31 lle3 (D) 31 dS Black can regain the exchange by 3 l...lbd5?! 32 lllxd5 'l'xb2 33 'l'xb2 �xb2, but after 34 lllxc7 Black is suffering, for example 34...l:l.b8 35 lld3, 34...llc8 35 lllxb5 llb8 36l:l.b3! or 34...�d435 lllxe8 .ixe3+36�g2 �d2 37 ll:lxd6 .ixb4 38 lbxb5 and White is better in every line. 32 li::JxdS White should avoid 32 e5 d4!. which gives Black a clear advantage after 33 'irxd4 'l'xb2 34 exf6 :.Xe3 35 'itxe3 �xf6. However, 32 ll:ld!! 'fila? 33 e5 was a perfectly good a!· temative to the text; after 33...ll:le4 the position is unclear. 32 .•• "ifa1+ 33 l:l.e1 1Wa7+! (D)
  47. 47. PETURSSON - ANAND, MANIU INIEKUJNAL 1990 47 I could have forced a draw by defensive moves subconsciously re- 33...li:'lxe4 34 l:lxal ltlxd2 35 l:txd2 !axes just when his troubles appear J.xal 36 li'Jxc7, but even though to be over, and commits a further er­ things had notgone according to plan, ror. In this case time-trouble proba- 1 win as st 11 hop ng to w n. Someti es ly a so pla e it is amistaketoplayunder theinflu- 34 ••• lLixds ence of your former advantage, but 35 l:ta2 1rd4! inthis case Black's optimism proved 36 11'xd4 i..xd4 justified. Petursson had overlooked that 34 �h2? Petursson returns the favour with this blunder. The alternatives were: 1) 34 �hi?! ltlxe4 35 l:la2 1Wb7 ! is also bad foe White. 2) 341We3!'l'xe3+ 35ttlxe3lDxe4 36 l:lc2 li:lxg3 37 ttlg2 l:d8 38 .l:l.xc7 �f5 with a near-certain draw. White has a nominal material advantage, but Black's pieces are well coordi­ nated and White's pawns are dis­ jointed, so he has no chance of putting it to use. It often happens that a player who has fought backfrom a bad po­ sitionwith a long series of accurate there was no way to catch one of the minor pieces, even though they are temptingly lined up on the d-file. 37 .l:l.dl fails to 37...li'Jc3 and 37 .l:l.d2 to 37....J.c3. 37 .:as ltlc3 38 eS .J.b6 39 .l:l.a3 ttlds 40 .ltb3 (D) 40 ttlxb4! Simplest. Now if 41 .l:l.xb4, then 4I...i.a5 42 .l:!.ebl .i.xb4 43 :Z:xb4 :Z:b8, and 44...c5, whentheconn��eted passed pawns will romp home. 41 .l:l.dl cS 42 l:ld7 l:lb8
  48. 48. 48 43 g4 44 l:a7 45 l:a6 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 46 l:a3 47 �g3 0-1 .i.dl b4 This game put me on + 1, but although it put me in the right direction, it was a late winning streak in which I beatLautier, Miles and M. Gurevich in consecutiverounds that made me a qualifierfor the Candidates. My next majorevent was the Novi Sad Olympiadtowardsthe endof 1990. I have always enjoyed playing in Olympiads. Dubai 1986 and Manila 1992 were my favourites; in both cases the organizers went all-out tomake the players feel comfortable. However, the Novi Sad Olympiad was also pleas­ ant, despite the cold and dismal weather. In general I enjoyed playingevents in the former Yugoslavia because of the great public interest, which always ensured a good turnout of spectators. I started the Olympiad with a good win against Olafsson, but lost arather silly game to Bouaziz in round 3. Later on things started to get better, and I was satisfied with my final score of71h/12. The followingeventful gamewas played in round 7.
  49. 49. Game 9 V. Anand - I. Morovic Fernandez Novi Sad Olympiad 1990 Sicilian, Maroczy Bind 1 e4 cS 2 lllf3 lllc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lllxd4 g6 5 c4 .tg7 6 i.e3 lllr6 7 llJc3 0-0 8 .tel d6 9 0-0 llld7 (D) I had played the white side of the Maroczy Bind before, including a good win against Larsen from the Cannes event mentioned previously. However, in that game Larsen played 9....i.d7 10 'itd2 li:lxd4 ll .txd4 .tc6. Morovic adopts a rather unusual move, re-deploying his knight to the queenside. 10 llb1 I was just casting around for a logical move, and since Black in­ tends to play ...lllc5, it seemed rea­ sonable toprepare to meet it with b4. It perhaps looks a little odd toput the rook on bI rather than c I or (after 'l'd2)dl, but in factWhite often puts his rooks on bl and c1 in this varia­ tion, in order to support a queenside pawn advance. Typically Wbite con­ tinues l:l.ci-bl to play a2-a3. Black responds with ...Wb6-b4. White then playsl:l.fcI to support the c3-knight. Play then revolves around White's ability to get a3 and b4 in, and Black's ability to stop it. The idea behind the text-move is to save time by going to b1 directly. 10 ••. lDcS When he played this anyway, I wondered what the idea was, as he seemed to be running into b4. Then I saw that after I I b4 llle6 1 2 lllxe6, he could play1 2...fxe6! (12....ixe6?! 1 3 llld5 is clearly better forWhite, to be followed by 'trd2, l:l.d1 and possi­ bly c5) 13 lllb5 e5. However, 14 c5 would then give White a slight ad­ vantage, so this would have been a valid alternative to the text-move.
  50. 50. 50 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 11 'ifd2 A flexible alternative; Whitekeeps open the possibility of b4 while de­ veloping his pieces. 11 ••• liJxd4 Black decides to prevent b4 by playing ...a5. Ifimmediately l l...a5, then 12 liJdb5; the plan is f3, fol­ lowed by liJd5, and White will play b3, a3 and b4 at his leisure. Black's c5-knight can eventually be kicked away, while the knight on b5 is there permanently. Hence Black's deci­ sion to swap knights before advanc­ ing the a-pawn. 12 �xd4 aS 13 b3 White is aiming for an eventual b4, but the immediate 1 3 a3 allows 1 3...a4. B 13 �d4 14 'iVxd4 (D) 14 b6?! There are some lines of the Mar­ oczy Bind in which ...b6 and ...�b7 is played, but normally on! where Black is aiming for central and king­ side play by ...liJh5 and ..f5 - it's a completely different type ofplanto that Black has adopted here. In this position ...b6 is an inaccurate move, which reduces Black's options. His queen can no longer occupy b6 and in some lines where Black plays ...e5, it is useful to have ...l:ta6 de­ fending the weak d6-pawn. 14...�d7 was probably better,al­ though Wbite has the interestingline 15 e5 liJe6 16 '1Fe3 dxe5 17 :tbdl! and Black still faces difficulties (if 1 7...f6, then 18 �f3). 15 J:lfe1 Now White has a very comfort· able position. He has a space advan­ tage and Black has no chance of playing ...b5 or ...d5, the two breaks which normally give Black counter· play in theMaroczy Bind. Moreover ...a4 is no danger, as Black cannot back it up by ...'llrb6, so White can always reply b4. The only question is how White arranges to play h4-h5 to step up the pressure on Black's poorly defended ldngside. 15 ••. �b7 16 .l:[bd1 The rook has done its duty on bl. inducing Blackto weaken hi queen· side. Now the need is forplay in the centre and in the changed circum stances White reacts by moving his rook to the half-open d-file.
  51. 51. ANAND - MOROVIC FERNANDEZ, NOV! SAD OLYMPIAD 1990 51 16 ••• f6 17 .i.g4 A nice move, activating White's bishop. Hedoesn't mindexchanging bishops, because in the Maroczy Bind White doesn't need many mi­ nor pieces to prosecute his advan­ tage. Black cannormally hold a pure major-piece position, but even one pair of minor pieces can be enough forWhite to exploithis space advan­ tage. 17 ... .ic6 18 b4 'fkc7 19 'i'eJ (D) 19 h5!? is possible, but I didn't want to cornrnit my pawns to light squares too quickly; Black might stillset upsomesortofdark-squared blockade by continuing ..,<jJg7, ...g5 and ...h6. 19 ... 'iWb7?! Black shouldplay 19...<jJg7!, when after 20 h5 g5. followed by ...h6, Blackhasset up thesort of blockade mentioned above. In this case White would have toprepare h5, forexam­ ple by playing llld5 orf4. It's only a small point, but in such positions you have to put asmanyobstacles in your opponent's path as possible. 20 bS White can push his h-pawn with­ out more ado, because ...g5 can al­ ways be met by h6, both creating a permanent danger to Black's king and making f4 much stronger. 20 ·- M7 (D) Now it is too late for 20...<jJg7 as White can play 21 h6+ <jJhS 22 f4, preventing ...g5. 21 lllds Preparing to step up the pressure on g6 by lllf4. 21 hxg6 would be premature; Black can defend after 2I ...hxg6 22 'ifh6 ltg7. 21 ... gS 22 h6 As intended. Now theg5-pawn is vulnerable to f4, and Black has to
  52. 52. 52 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS look after e7, as the rook can always be driven away by ..th5. 22 ••• �h8 23 a3 Black's position on the kingside is creaking and now Wbite inconven­ iences him further by resuming his queenside play. 23 e6 24 b4 axb4 25 axb4 exdS 26 exdS?! A mistake, not because it doesn't win but because 26 bxc5 ! was much simpler. If Black takes on c4 or e4, White obtains a tremendous passed pawn on d6, while after 26...d4 27 :lb.d4 dxc5 28 .l::!d6, followed by e5, Black's king will come under a dev­ astating attack. 26 ..ta4(D) 27 bxcS? Seduced by beauty, I allowed my­ selfto be distracted from the process of gaining a point! I had seen the winning move 27 ll:al !,whereupon 27.../i',d7 28 .:lb.a4 l:l.xa4 29 •e8+ lt:lf8 (29..1lf8 30 1le7 forces mate) 30 'ilfxa4 is hopeless for Black, butI unwisely decided to 'win' in more flashy style. 27 28 c6 ..txdl 1le7! (D) Somehow this move had escaped my attention. White stillhas the ad· vantagebecause ofhis powerfulpro­ tected passed pawn, but of course I had spoilt my winning position. 29 'li'c3 White has a slight advantageafter 29 .l::!xdl 'li'xe3 30 fxe3 f5, but the pawns appeared so strong that I thought I couldplay on with a queen against two rooks and a bishop. 29 'li'xel+ 30 "ifxel hg4 31 'li'b4? Another error. 31 "tfe4! .i.h5 32 'li'e6 wins the d-pawn (32...l:ld8? 33 c7 wins) without allowing Black to
  53. 53. ANAND - MOROV/t FERNANDEZ. NOV/ SAD OLYMPIAD 1990 53 take the c4-pawn in return,which should be enough foc a clear advan­ tage. 31 32 "ilxd6 33 c7?! .ie2 .ixc4 (D) 33 'i'c6 is a better try: 1) 33.. .:Z.ff8? 34 'il'e7 wins im­ mediately. 2) 33...�g8 34 c7 .ixd5 (or 34....ia6 35 d6 .ic8 36 'ii'e8+ l:tf8 37 d7 .ixd7 38 "ilxd7 and wins) 35 c8'ii'+ (35 "ilxd5 .l:te836 "ild8 is also effective) 35....:Xc8 36 1Wxc8+ .l:tf8 37 'ii'd7 .if7 38 "ile7 wins. 2) 33....l:tafll! 34 "ile4 .ia6! (a dif­ ficult move to see; after 34....ixd5 35 "ilxd5 Black can't immediately double rooks against the pawn, for example 35....l:tc7 allows 36 "ild6) 35 d6 .ic8 36 'ii'd5 �g8 37 d7 .ixd7 38 cxd7 .l:td8 39 "ile6 Wf8 and Black draws. 33 ••• .l:te8?? A time-trouble blunder. Black could force a draw by 33....l:taf8! 34 "ilc6 .ixd5 35 "ilxd5 .l:txc7 36 "ild6 .l:tcf7 37 11xb6. 34 We6! Grabbing my chance. 34 ... .l:tfl'8 35 c8'1f! A pretty win. 35 .:XeS 36 'ii'e7 1·0 InApril 1991 I played in a tournament held in Munich. While I very much liked thecity, I have less happy memories of the chess. In fact, my greatest pleasure was the blitz tournament held at the end, which I won with 14/15, 21h points ahead ofthe next player. Inround 1 I lost to Nunn, and in round 2 I was fortunate todefeat Zsuzsa Polgar. In round 3 I met Beliavsky, and the result was one of the few good games I played at Munich.
  54. 54. Game 10 A. Beliavsky - V. Anand Munich 1991 Pirc Defence In our previous encounter (Linares 1991) I had built upa totally won po­ sition only to perpetrate a form of hara-kiri. I was very pleased to get revenge in this game! 1 d4 d6 2 e4 liJf6 3 liJc3 g6 4 (4 ..tg7 5 liJf3 0-0 6 ..te3 b6 (D) When I was studying this line from White's point of view, I won­ dered why 6...b6 wasn't a more popular reply. Black forces through ...c5, and ifWhite is to try for an ad­ vantage he has to push all his pawns forward in the centre, which is very committal. If the pawns eventually tum out to be weak, the weakness wiJI probably be serious. 7 e5 liJg4 8 .i.gl cS 9 h3 White avoids a little trap: 9 dxc5 bxc5 10 'ill'd5 'ill'b6 I I ifxa8 losesto I I.....tb7 1 2 liJd5 ifxb2. 9 liJh6 10 d5 i.b7 (D) I knew the theory, but at this point I decided to ignore it andjust look at the position. It seemed to me that Black could play very natural moves. The point of this one is to play ...e6 andcompletelydestroy White's cen· tre. After the resulting exchanges
  55. 55. BEUAVSKY - ANAND, MUNICH 1991 55 Black may be left with a weak pawn (for example, on e6) but it doesn't matter because Black has generated so much active play for his pieces. While the specific move IO.....i.b7 was thoughtupoverthe board, I had looked at these lines before and the ideas I had during this earlier analy­ sis germinated into this 'innov­ ation'. 11 "i'd2 After 1 1 "i'e2 ..i.a6 (I I...a6 and I2...b5 is also possible) I2 'l'f2 i.xfl 13 "i'xfl lLlf5 Black equalizes comfortably. If White tries to shut the h6-knight out by I I g4, then Black plays I l...dxe5 I2 fxe5 e6 I3 i.c4 exd5! (13...b5 I4 ..i.xb5 exd5 IS i.xc5 favours White) I4 ..i.xd5 with an unclearposition.The knight on h6 isbad, but thee5-pawn is weak and gi-bishop is also oddly placed. 11 ... lLlfS 12 ..i.h2 After I2 ..i.f2 dxe5 I3 fxeS e6 White doesn't have time to castle long owing to I4 0-0-0 .i.h6. Hence the text-move. 12 dxeS 13 fxeS e6! 14 0-0-0 Other moves are ineffective, e.g. I4 g4 i0114 is very bad for White, I4 d6 lLld7 leaves e5 collapsing and fi­ nally 14..i.c4 .ih6 (14...exd5 15 i.xds lLlc6and I4...b5 I5 lLlxb5 exd5 16 i.d3 are also possible, in both cases with an unclear position) IS ..i.f4 ..i.xf4 I6 1Wxf4 exd5 I7 0-0-0 d4 IS lLle4 lDd7 leaves White with­ out enough for the pawn. 14 exdS 1S lLixdS lLc6 16 c3 (D) Underestimating Black's initia­ tive. If White had time for ..i.c4 and l:hei then he would have a clearad­ vantage, but Black's counterplay is so fast that he has no time for the necessary consolidation, e.g. I6 ..i.c4 lLlcd4 I7 lLlxd4 cxd4 attacking the d5-knight and, when it moves, creat­ ing the possibility of ...lLle3. 16 ••• lLlcd4 17 lLr6+ I7 cxd4 11fxd5 IS �bi :adS is verygood for Black. 17 ..i.xf6 18 cxd4 IS exf6 .'Llxf3 I9 gxf3 11fxf6 gives Black a safe extra pawn. 18 ..i.g7 19 dS (D)
  56. 56. 56 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 19 c4! Essential. IfWhitecouldplay.i.c4, then Black would be in some trou­ ble. Now Black locks in the bishop on f1 and frees the c5-square for the manoeuvre ...l:lc8-c5. All Black's moves are very natural; he has the initiative and must make use ofit be­ fore White completes his develop­ ment, so heneed only consider active moves. 20 .tel? In the critical position White goes wrong. Heshouldplay 20 �bl , with the possible continuation 20...l:lc8 21 d6 (21 .i.e2 .i.h6 22 .i.f4 .i.xf423 'l'xf4 .i.xd5 transposes to the game) and now Black can choose between 21...1lrd7 and 21...b5. Black has a lot of trumps, not least of which is his lead in development. Theposition is unclear but I prefer Black. 20 ... l:lc8 21 �b1 21 g4 Ci:Je7 22 d6 00, threaten­ ing 23...c3, favours Black. 21 ... .1h6 22 .i.f4 After 22 11rc3 Black can also safely take the d5-pawn. 22 Jud4 23 11rxf4 .i.xdS! (D) - w • 24 h4?! There is no way Whitecanexploit the d-file pin, so he tries fora king­ side attack. The alternatives were: 1) 24 Ci:Jd4 c3 (24...Ci:Jg7 25 ttlb51 is bad, but 24...'llrb4 25 .i.g4 1Llxd4 26 llxd4 llcd8 is a reasonable alter­ native for Black) 25 bxc3 'i'h4 26 .i.g4 Ci:Jxd4 27 l:lxd4 .i.xg2 28 :gl .i.xh3 29 .i.xc8 11rxf4 30 J:lxf4AxeS is excellent for Black. He has two connected passed pawns forthe ex­ changeand White'sremainingpawns are weak. 2) 24 lld2 c3 (alternatively, after 24...llc5 25 llhdl 11ra8 Black keeps his extra pawn) 25 bxc3 J:lxcJ 26 llhdl Ci:Je3 and Black is clearly bet­ ter.
  57. 57. BEUAVSKY - ANAND, MUNICH 1991 57 3) 24g4 tiJg7 25 'l'h6 tiJe6 26 h4 c3 27 bxc3 (27 �g5 c2+ 28 �a! cxdl'l'+ 29 .l%xdl �xg5 and Black wins) 27...i.e4+ 28 �b2 'ilc7 fa­ vours Black. White's pawns are weak and his king exposed. 24 ••• c3 25 bxc3 .l%xc3 26 bS lLle3! Black's attack is much faster than anything White can muster. 21 lt)gs After 27 hxg6 fxg6 28 'l'h6 "flc7 Black defends h7 and White will be mated, while after 27 "flh6 ll!xdI 28 hxg6 (28 ll!g5 .i.xa2+ forces mate) 28....i.e4+ 29 �a! .i.xg6Black wins easily. 27 ••• 28 ll!m7 0-1 flc7 l:lb3+! It is mate after 29 axb3 flc2+ 30 �a! 'ilc3+3 1 �bl "flxb3+ 32 �al lllc2#. A few days afterqualifying from the Manila Interzonal, I received an invi­ tation to play in Linares (1991) from Seiior Rentero. On my way to Linares (which was a couple of months before the Munich event mentioned above) I stopped offfor a couple of days inAmsterdam.There I receivedthe news that FIDE had made the pairings for the quarter-finals. Instead of the simple 1 vs 8, 2 vs 7, etc., they had changed the system such that anyone in the top half could be paired against anyone from the bottom half . Karpov, Timman, Yusupov and Short were in the top half of the draw, with Gelfand, Ivanchuk, Korchnoi and myself in the bottom. I was paired against Karpov, who at that time was a formidable opponent. Just at that moment I was quite annoyed by this pairing, but later I took the view that you couldn't become World Champion by avoiding people - you just have to take oppo­ nents as they come. I washeartened by the fact that I beat Karpov quite easily in Linares after he misplayed a promising position. Between then and the match in August neither of us had produced any inspiring results. My own performance in Munich was not very satisfactory, while Karpov had drawn a match 2-2 with Agdestein. Inthe firstgame of the match itself I played an insipid system; to be honest we (my second in this match was M. Gurevich)knew that itgave White noth­ ing against best play, but we decided to try it anyway. because Karpov had failed to find the correct solution in a previous game. He got a bad position with an isolated pawn and suffered a lot, but defended very well and, indeed, outplayed me completely. However, he threw away all his good efforts by misplaying the ending.
  58. 58. 58 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS In the second game I outplayed Karpov completely, but then went wrong and had to acquiesce to a draw. In the third game I could have mated him in a few moves, but somehow just didn't see it. Then I lost the founhgame. In both game two and game four I had played the Meran Defence, which I pre­ pared especially for this match; I felt it was a dynamic opening and that Kar­ pov wasn't particularly good against it. In games two and four I had played after I d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3 tbf3 tbf6 4 tbc3 e6 5 e3 tbbd7 6 .ie2 .id6 7 0-0 0-0 8 'i!Vc2 dxc4 9 .ixc4, a plan involving ...a6. In game four Karpov had found a pretty good line against this system, so in game six I decided to switch to 9...'i!Ve7, which also formedpart of my preparation. I should addthat game five was unfinished when the following game was played, but I waswinning the adjourned position.
  59. 59. Game 11 A. Karpov - V. Anand Candidates match (6), Brussels 1991 Semi-Slav 1 d4 dS 2 c4 c:6 3 lllf3 �f6 4 0.c3 e6 5 eJ �bd7 6 'i'c2 i.d6 7 i.e2 0-0 8 0-0 dxc4 9 hc4 'ii'e7 10 h3 To avoid the exchange of knights after ...�e5, but it is not a very ambi­ tious move. 13 ••• iDeS 14 .i.b3 i.d7 15 i.eJ (D) Ingame eight he finally found the rightrecipe, which is to play 10 a3. B 10 ••. cS Ingame fourI hadplayed 10...a6. 11 dxcS i.xcS 12 e4 (D) 12 • • • 13 �d4 i.d6 15 ••• �g6 15...l:tfd8? is a loss oftime; White continues 16 f4 �c6 17 e5 �xd4 1 8 i.xd4 i.c5 19 l:tad1 (after 1 9 i.xc5 'ihcS+ 20'ii"f2'ihf2+ 21 :x£2 iDeS 22 l:td1 i.c6 23 l:tfd2l:txd2 24 l:txd2 �f8 Blackshouldholdon)and now: 1) 19...i.c6?20exf6l:!.xd4(White also wins after 20...i.xd4+ 21 l:txd4 1Wc5 22 lbe2!) 21 fxe7 l:txdl+ 22 �h2 l:txfl 23 'i'd3 i.gl+ 24 �h1 and White is winning.
  60. 60. 60 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 2) 19....ixd4+ 20 :Xd4 ll:le8 21 l:l.fd1 and White is clearly better. After the text-move Black has more or less equalized. 16 J:l.ad1 J:l.fd8 17 ll:lr3 .ic6 18 J:l.fe1 l:tdc8 This looks a little odd, but I felt it was important to inconvenience White's queen by playing a rook to c8. The aS-rook can't go there be­ cause the a7-pawn is hanging, so it has to be this one. White must move his queen because 19....ixe4 is a threat. 19 'l'bl (D) . 0, -B - 19 NO .ib4 Everything is based on threats against the e4-pawn. 20 .id2 After 20 .id4 e5 the e-pawn would be in serious trouble. In this position only White can be worse, because of his exposed e-pawn. 20 l:td8 The rook returns now that White has been forced to block the d-file. 21 a3 .icS 22 ll:la4 .id6 (D) Black is more or less committed to this piece sacrifice, as 22....ixa4 23 .ixa4 would give White a slight advantage based on his two bishops. However, I had no objections as I feltthat it was promising for Black. 23 ll:lc3? After this cop-out, Black's pieces are more harmoniously placed. The criticalline is 23 e5! .ixf3 and now: 1) 24exf6 (bad) 24...'1'xf625 gxf3 .if4! and now: Ia) 26 .ic3 "irg5+ 27 �h1 (27 �fl "irb5+) 27...1Wh5 28 �g2 lllh4+ and wins. 1b) 26 .ixf4 ll:lxf4 also wins. 1c) 26 .ib4 'ii'g5+ 27�fl 'li'b5+· followed by 28...a5, with a distinct plus for Black. 2) 24 exd6 (best) 24...'1'xd6 25 gxf3 ll:lh4 and now:
  61. 61. KARPOV - ANAND, BRUSSELS CANDIDKTES 1991 61 2a) 26 .tc3?! lllxf3+ 27 �g2 ®14+ 28 1i>fl (28 'iii>g1 'ifc6 is dead lost) 28_.'i'a6+ 29 l'Z.e2 'il'c6 and Blackshould win. 2b) 26 .i.e3? lilxf3+ wins. 2c) 26 l'Z.e3 (D) and now: 2c l) 26...1i'f4?! 27 l'Z.d3! lilxf3+ 28 �g2 lilh4+ (28...lilxd2 29 l'Z.1xd2 'i'gS+ 30 �fl 1i'xd2 3 1 l'Z.xd2 l'Z.xd2 gives White an edge) 29 �fl 'il'h2 30 .tg5! (30 .i.c3 lild5 31 .i.xd5 l'Z.xd5 32 lilc5 is unclear) 30...l'Z.xd3 31 'i'xd3 'il'g2+ 32 �e2 lilg6 33 l'g3 favours White. 2c2) 26...1i'c6 27 .i.c3 .!l'lxf3+ 28 �fl b5 with a final branch: 2c21) 29 l'Z.xd8+ l'Z.xd8 30 .i.d1 IOd4 (30...lild2+ 31 .i.xd2 l'Z.xd2 32 .tn defends, while 30...lilh4 31 .txf6 gxf6 32 l'Z.g3+ �h8 33 .!l'lc3 'i'hI+ 34 �e2 lilf5 35 l'Z.d3 lild4+ 36 �d2 is at least equal for White) 31 i.xd4 l'Z.xd4 32 lilc3 1i'h1 + 33 �e2 lllh5 34 J:f3 1i'h2 35 .i.c2 lilf4+ 36 �3 lilg2+ 37 Wxd4 1i'd6+ 38 �e4 'il'c6+ 39 �e5 and this exciting line ends in a draw by perpetual check. 2c22) 29 lilc5 lilh2+ 30 �e2 'il'xc5 31 l'Z.xd8+ l'Z.xd8 32 .i.xf6 gxf6 33 1i'g1+ �h8 34 'il'xh2 'il'cl is unclear. The conclusion is that White may be able to hold the balance by ac­ cepting the sacrifice, but it would have been very difficult for Karpov to find all this at the board! 23 ••• 'il'c1 (D) If we look at the total effect ofthe last five moves, White has played .i.d2, 'ifbl and a3, while Black has achieved ...1i'c7. Thus White's queen and bishop have been pushed back, while Black has improved his queen position and now controls e5 - Black's manoeuvrecan be counted a success. Now Black is slightly better be­ cause he can expand on the queen­ side, while in the meantime White's pieces are only crawling back to their earlier positions.
  62. 62. 62 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 24 �a2 It's hard to say what this move is for. Perhaps he was worried that af­ ter ...j_cs, there might be a threat of ...j_xf2+ and ...'l'b6+, butit's only a guess. 24 •.• a6 25 j_eJ b5 White's 24th move is revealed as a mistake. It may have solved one problem, but now the bishop has to return in order to meet ...'l'b7 by j_c2. 26 j_b3 j_b7 27 .:tel 'l'e7 (D) I was very proud of this game, be­ cause I felt that I had outplayed Kar­ pov in themanoeuvring phase of the game. The idea now is ...�7 fol­ lowed by either ...lllcS or ...lLldeS heading for c4. 28 .1b6 l:.dc8 29 .1d4 Now 29 e5 .ixf3 is good for Black, as 30 exf6 1i'xf6 leads to variations similar to those in the note to White's 23rd move, while 30 exd6 'l'xd6 attacks the bishop on b6 so there is no win of a piece. 29 ·- �7 30 l:.cdl Over the last few moves White has only been moving his pieces backwards and forwards, simply re­ sponding to Black's various threats, while Black has gained space on the queenside and created an outpost at c4. Nevertheless, the symmetrical nature of the position exerts adraw­ ish tendency. Black's position is more comfortable and easiertoplay, but one cannot say more than that 30 liJgeS 31 liJxeS lillce5 (D) 32 liJe2? An error, overlooking the reply. 32 ••• 1i'h4 33 f4 After 33 lt:lc3 Black continues 33...lllf3+ 34 gxf3 1i'xh3 35 l:.d3
  63. 63. KARPOV - ANAND, BRUSSEU CANDIDKI'ES 1991 63 .A.h2+ 36 �hl .i.£4+ 37 'iilgl :tc6, and the possibility of playing ...e5 and switching the rook to the king­ side givesBlackaneasy win. The al­ ternative 33 lLlg3 is similar; then 33...<�f3+ 34 gxf3 .bg3 35 'iilg2 .A.f4 doesn't lead to a winning at­ tack, but White's pawn structure is significantly damaged. The text-move is therefore forced, but it is a move White certainly doesn't want to play with Black's bishops pointing at the kingside. 33 ••• lLle4 34 .if2 .icS 35 .!xeS :XeS (D) 36 .l:l.el? 36.l:l.d4was abetterdefence, when 36...ll:lxb2? loses to 37 :tfl lLlc4 38 .ixc4. However, Black can continue 36....1:1.ac8 with a clear advantage. 36 •.• li)d2 37 Wd3 li:Jxe4?! One of my weaknesses during this match was myinefficiency in converting technically winning po­ sitions. Too often I played moves which just maintained my advan­ tage, instead of pressing it home forcefully. On the other hand, Kar­ pov, although he only gained a large advantage twice, pushed it home both times, and this effectively de­ cided the match. Here 37....l:td8! 38 'ire3 lLlxb3 39 'irxb3 .ixe4 would be a much im­ proved version of what happens in the game. 38 'ife3 39 .l:l.edl .l:l.ac8 h6 39...g6 would have been slightly more precise. 40 :n 41 lLlc3 lLlf6 'ii'hS (D) Black has a clear extra pawn, and despite White's stern resistance, the win shouldonly be amatteroftime. 42 :1d6 .I:I.Se6 43 .l:l.xc6 .ixe6 44 :1f2 li)d7
  64. 64. 64 VISHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS 45 �d2 I decided not to try to find a mid­ dlegame win, but just to liquidate down to an ending. 46 'i'xe5 47 .tel 48 <M2 49 �e3 50 g3 51 ..tdl ltJxe5 Wf8 �e7 liJd7 �6 ltJe8 (D) At some point I should play ...g5, so that if White plays h4, then Black can reply ...gxh4 followed by ...J:tg8, when White has the possibility of a g-file penetration to worry about. 52 .tel 53 .i.d3 ltJd6 .i.b7 53...g5 would still be good, but this is the last chance as White now prevents it (of course, he could have played h4 earlier himself). 54 h4 Now any attempt to prepare ...g5 will just lead to a lot of simplifica­ tion. 54 "" ltJc4+?! A real mistake. Again it doesn't give away Black's advantage but it makes the win fairly complicated 1n endings with bishop and knight each, exchanging dissimilar pieces (i.e. a bishop for a knight) has the effect of increasing the defender's drawing chances. The superior side should therefore only exchangesimi­ lar pieces. 55 he4 lbc4 Now White has much betterpros pects of setting up a dark-squared blockade. 56 :td4 :tcS (D) 57 a4 At this point I decided to sit down and really calculate, because I could see that the win was no longer going to be trivial. 57 ••• eS Over the next few moves Kar­ pov's resistance starts to weaken. 58 l:lb4
  65. 65. KARPOV - ANAND, BRUSSEI.S CANDIDATES 1991 65 Already 58 fxe5 l::txe5+ 59 'it>f2 was more accurate, when Black has a long way to go to create a passed pawnon the kingside. 58 .i.c6 59 axbS axbS 60 �2? (D) This was White's last chance to play 60 fxe5 l::txe5+ 61 'it>f2. B 60 f6! Now Black retains control of the key dark squares d4 and f4, and the Another bad move. White should have tried 6 l ll'lc3. 61 ••• 'it>e6 62 l:la3 l:lc2 Now Black is winning. 63 fxe5 fxe5 64 l:la6 The only line I needed to calcu­ late was 64 l:lc3 l:lxc3+ 65 ll'lxc3 'it>d6 66 b4'it>e667�d3'it>£5 68 �e3 �g469 �f2 e4 70ll'ldI 'it>£5 71 �e3 �e5 72 ll'lc3 g6 (but not 72...g5? 73 hxg5 hxg5 74 g4 and White escapes with a draw) 73 g4 g5 74 h5 .i.d7 and Black wins. 64 ••• �d6 65 b4 65 l:la7 l:lxb2 66 l::txg7 b4 is also an easy win. 65 i:ia7 :C4 66 .i.d7 67 l:la6+ �7 68 l:lg6 �7 69 l:ld6 .i.g4 70 l:ldS l:lc2 white knight will feel a lack of good 0-1 squares. As the knight is trapped after 71 61 :b3? ll'lgl l:lg2. This game was finished after theconclusionofthefifthgame; the two ad­ journament were played on the same day.Unfortunately , in the adjourment ofthe fifth game Ifirst made a simple win rathercomplicated and then, when I need to calculate a long forced line in order to win , I made a mistake that allowed him to gain a tempo.Thegameended in adraw. Here Karpov's expe­ rience alsoplayed a part. He had two lost positions (games five and six), but he concentrated all his efforts on finding resources in game five (where had a better chance to save the game) and eventually managed to salvage a half-point
  66. 66. 66 VJSHY ANAND: MY BEST GAMES OF CHESS I missed a forced win in the seventh game and then he won the eighth game totake the match. Cenainly he defended very well in thismatch,buthedidn't demonstrate the form which would have taken him to the world champion­ ship, and he subsequently lost to Short in the semi-finals. The two matches I played in this Candidates cycle were virtually the first matches I had ever played. Before, I had only played a not especially serious four-game match with Levitt. When the next Candidates cycle came around, the experience of match play that I gained against Dreev and Karpov turned out to be very useful. The 1991 Tilburg tournament was adouble-roundevent. Priorto this tour­ nament I had only played Kasparov once, the game ending in a draw. In the first cycle at Tilburg I lost, but gained my revenge in the game immediately following. I won again in Reggio Emilia (see Game 1 3) but, to date, that was the last I saw of a plus score against him!

×