Acknowledgments                                White Paper Authors Luis Nieves-Ruiz, AICP, Senior Planner, Research and In...
INTRODUCTION                                    The food industry in the United States has become so efficient            ...
specific food related activity in Orange County and to create a map series. The second part ofthe report focuses in the ma...
Central Florida Regional Council (ECFRC), the number of farms in Orange County went down32 percent between 1954 and 1964 (...
Agricultural land is concentrated in certain parts of the County. The smallest cluster is innorthwest Orange County betwee...
In addition to these urban parcels, there are almost 22,000 acres of land used for agriculturalpurposes within the municip...
districts have Timberland (54’s) or Pasture Land (61-63) DOR codes. A similar pattern occurswith parcels designated with o...
Moreover, the county’s farm typology also supports this premise. Farm typology classifies farmsby their number of sales an...
The next part of the report gives a description of the main agricultural commodities produced inOrange County. It also rev...
previous Census. Exhibit 6 depicts some of the citrus agricultural products that were harvestedin Orange County in 2007.  ...
could be characterized as mature and are between 16 and 20 years of age. This means thatthey will have about 20 years to k...
2030 (Kilponen, 2006). The largest groves within the villages are owned by constructioncompanies, so there would not be mu...
of new cattle breeds and closing of the open ranges by law helped to somewhat improve thequality of Florida’s cattle. Howe...
pasture is grazing land that is drained and receives varying degrees of fertilization to enhancethe quality and yield of i...
Native pasture, the most abundant in Orange County, is forest land that had most of its treesremoved to promote the growth...
these are small operations that usually cater to the organic market. There are also several farmsthat are dedicated for th...
Blossom Trail in Orlando, and Florida Turnpike and SR 528 in Unincorporated Orange County.Most of these food operations ar...
food for animal consumption. The sole company in our area within this category was alsoomitted from this analysis.To under...
The fact that the Other Food Manufacturing category is the dominant food processing industry inOrange County speaks volume...
is the Ali Halal slaughter house located in northeast Orange County. This is the only Muslimslaughterhouse in the Central ...
Finally, there are other food producing companies that cater toward naturopathic and vegansectors. Galaxy Nutritional Food...
These are firms that distribute produce, such as Fruit and Vegetables. This sector also includesanimal product distributor...
businesses. One is in North West Orlando between North Orange Blossom Trail and WestColonial Drive, another is near the in...
FOOD INDUSTRIES LAND USE CONTEXTThe previous sections showed the distribution of the agricultural, food processing, andwho...
distribution. Based on the information found in this report, several assumptions can be madeabout the local food productio...
Like much of the United States, the food production system in Orange County could bedescribed as “broken”, in that there i...
ReferencesAkerman, Joe A. Florida Cowman: A History of Florida Cattle Raising (1976). Jimbob Printing Inc.        Madison,...
Kelly,L. It’s now easier to find halal meat. St. Petersburg Times. Originally published on March 10, 2006.        Retrieve...
APPENDIX TABLES                  Number of Operations by Food Crop in Orange County, FL 2007                            Fo...
Number of Operations by Animal Farm in Orange County, FL 2007                 Food Products                            Num...
Department of Revenue Property Use CodesCode                                           Description6100     Grazing land - ...
Food Processing Operations in Orange County, 2005            NAICS Code and Description                               Oper...
Food Wholesale Merchant Businesses in Orange County FL, 2005         NAICS Code and Description                           ...
Wayne Densch Charities                                  Central Frespak Seafood Corp                                  Gary...
Darland Bakery Inc.                        Flowers Bakery Thrift Store                        Toufayan Bakery of Florida I...
Food Production in Orange County
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Food Production in Orange County

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An overview of food production in Orange County, FL including agriculture, manufacturing, and whole sale.

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Food Production in Orange County

  1. 1. Acknowledgments White Paper Authors Luis Nieves-Ruiz, AICP, Senior Planner, Research and Intergovernmental Coordination Joshua Hoffman, Planning Intern, Research and Intergovernmental Coordination Editors Althea Jefferson, AICP, Planning AdministratorAlissa Barber Torres, AICP, Chief Planner, Research and Intergovernmental Coordination Photo Credits Gil Ihrig, Graphic Artist Supervisor Jennifer Dubois, AICP, Senior Planner, Development Review Cover Mike Swann, Graphic Artist
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION The food industry in the United States has become so efficient that it is able to provide food that is plentiful, reasonably priced, and varied for most consumers. The agricultural production system has become dependent on economies of scale and standardization. Farms have become larger and less diversified to satisfy the needs of wholesale, retail, andinstitutional customers. Most crops are grown to be exported or processed in a distant location,and then shipped back to the local consumers. This chain of activities linking food movementfrom farm to table is referred to as “food systems” and it has three main components:production, processing, and consumption. The characteristics of these food networks can beprimarily attributed to macroeconomic, demographic, geographic, and environmental factors.However, it has been recently noted that the local policy framework, including land useregulations, does play a role in the creation of food systems. With the publication of its first foodpolicy guide in 2007, the American Planning Association aimed to integrate food-relatedconsiderations into regular planning functions. The logic is that planners already implementlocal land use policies and are better able to determine if the current land use patterns meet thebasic needs of the local population.The recent update of Orange County’s Comprehensive Plan provided the first opportunity toexamine the local land use patterns and the location of agricultural land in Orange County.During this time, the Orlando Farm Bureau published its report “The Contribution ofAgribusiness to Orange County, Florida,” which addressed the economic impacts of the foodindustry in Orange County. At this time, the revision of Orange County’s Land DevelopmentRegulations into a Unified Land Development Code provides a unique opportunity to addressfood issues at a local level.This paper focuses on Orange County’s food production and processing, which is the first partof the food systems. Food production includes several activities, such as farming, processing,storage and wholesale distribution (Pothukuchi and Kaufman, 2000). According to the OrlandoFarm Bureau, in 2007 the agriculture and food industry sectors contributed $7.2 billion to thelocal economy, created 77,091 jobs, and paid $1.6 billion in wages in 2006 (Evans). Most of thefarm data used for this study is from the 2007 USDA Agricultural Census. To supplement theCensus information, as well as to provide more recent data, staff calculated land acreage usingthe Florida Department of Revenue (DOR) codes created by the Property Appraiser’s Office andOrange County’s Geographic Information Systemsi. This information was also used to locateOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 2 of 36 Planning Division
  3. 3. specific food related activity in Orange County and to create a map series. The second part ofthe report focuses in the manufacturing and processing industries in Orange County. Staff useddata from the InfoUSA business database from the year 2005 and the DOR codes to locatefood-related businesses in Orange County. A complete list of the DOR codes used in thisproject is provided at the end of the report.AGRICULTURE IN ORANGE COUNTY The first stage in the food production cycle is agriculture, which for food systems purposes includes growing crops and raising animals for human consumption. More often than not, these agricultural activities take place on farms or ranches. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) defines farms as any place thatproduces and sells $1,000 or more in agricultural products in a given year. Nationwide, thenumber of farms has been on a declining trend nationwide since World War II. Most of thisdownturn is partly the result of changes in urbanization patterns, shifts to a service economy,and the opening of global markets. These changes have also contributed to the concentration ofproduction in agriculture. In 2007, 125,000 farms accounted for 75 percent of the value of U.S.agricultural production. Moreover, 59 percent of production was attributed to farms with morethan $1,000,000 in sales (USDA, 2007).These economic and social trends have certainly played a role in shaping agriculture in OrangeCounty. Through its early history, agriculture was a major force in shaping Orange County’seconomic and social history. Early settlers, in what was then known as “Mosquito County,”dedicated themselves to raising cattle, cultivating orange groves, and growing flowers. By 1940,agriculture and agriculturally-dependent industries accounted for more than 30 percent of alljobs in the region. Agriculture employment itself comprised 17.5 percent of the workforce,followed by wholesale trade (fruit and vegetable package and shipping) with 8.2 percent, andmanufacturing (food and kindred products) with 6.5 percent. By 1963, agri-business employedmore than 26,300 people, more than half of the jobs provided by the Cape Canaveral space-related industries at that time.Suburban patterns of development have created problems for the agriculture sector with thepartition of large parcels into half-acre lots. It is interesting that since the early 1950s, plannershave been decrying the loss of agricultural land and farms in the region. According to the EastOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 3 of 36 Planning Division
  4. 4. Central Florida Regional Council (ECFRC), the number of farms in Orange County went down32 percent between 1954 and 1964 (Chamberlain, Durak & Gerken, 1965). Also beginning inthe 1950s, Florida started to receive a big influx of residents from the North. These migrantsexerted a big influence in the citrus industry. Between 1959 and 1964, Orange County lostabout 35 percent of its citrus acreage. “Counties such as Orange and Pinellas began to losemany acres of citrus to urbanization, and land values and taxes began to increase to thedetriment of the local citrus industry”(Jackson and Davies, p.13). Many small farms were dividedfor residential use. For example, while the number of 10 to 19 acre farms declined by 23percent, the number of farms that were less than 10 acres increased. Many of the newresidences being built at the time retained about one or two acres of citrus trees.The arrival of Disney in 1971 was probably a main factor in the decline of agriculture’simportance in Orange County, as the local economy shifted from an agricultural economy to onebased on services. The tourism industry, comprised of theme parks, hotels and lodging places,and convention center activities, now accounts for about half of the jobs in our area. Theseactivities have helped to spur population growth and the escalation of land values. However,several other factors have affected the viability of farming in Orange County. Economicrestructuring and free trade has increased competition of national agricultural products, ascheaper products from other countries flow to the local supermarkets. Moreover, the agriculturalsystem supports the export of products over local production. Constant freezes have affectedthe citrus industry by destroying most of the groves in the area. Through the years, the WaterManagement District has instituted well water retention and withdrawal requirements thataffected water supply for most farming operations in the area. Finally, the closing of the LakeApopka muck farms in the late 1990s eliminated most of the vegetable farms left in OrangeCounty.Even though its role in the local economy has declined in importance when compared to tourismand other service industries, agriculture and its supporting activities in Orange County stillgenerate a significant amount of economic activity. The Orlando Farm Bureau estimates thatthese industries generated $472 million in annual sales, and were responsible for creating 8,220jobs and $207 million in wages (Evans, 2007).Exhibit 1 depicts the distribution of agricultural land in Orange County, based on DOR codes.According to these categories, there are 152,076.5 acres with an agricultural land use in OrangeCounty. Most of this agricultural land is used as pastures for cattle, followed by crops (includingcitrus), and timberland.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 4 of 36 Planning Division
  5. 5. Agricultural land is concentrated in certain parts of the County. The smallest cluster is innorthwest Orange County between the City of Apopka and Lake County. Most of the land in thisarea is dedicated to floriculture and nurseries, which explains the smaller lots. A bigger clusterof agricultural land is located south of Lake Apopka, within the Horizon West planning area.According to the County’s GIS, there are 9,249 acres of agricultural land within this area. Thelargest swath of agricultural land is located in southeast Orange County, east of the CentralFlorida Greeneway (SR 417). Exhibit1: Distribution of Agricultural Land in Orange County, 2008 Source: Orange County, GIS, 2008More than 80 percent of agricultural land in Orange County is located within the unincorporatedarea. Exhibit 2 shows the distribution of agricultural land in unincorporated Orange County. Ofthe 130,076.8 acres of agricultural land available in unincorporated Orange County, most of it islocated within the County’s Rural Service Area. Surprisingly, less than two percent of this land iswithin the County’s Rural Settlements. However, there are more than 15,000 acres of land usedfor agricultural purposes within the County’s Urban Service Area.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 5 of 36 Planning Division
  6. 6. In addition to these urban parcels, there are almost 22,000 acres of land used for agriculturalpurposes within the municipalities. Forty two percent of these parcels are within the City ofOrlando. The Reedy Creek Improvement District and Cities of Apopka and Winter Gardenaccount for a majority of the remaining parcels. Exhibit 2: Agricultural Land within Urban Service Area and Rural Settlements Source: Orange County GIS, 2008There are several compelling reasons to study why there is agricultural land within the USA.One reason might be that these parcels of land are remnants from the development process.Are these parcels just sitting idle until development occurs? Is there any real agricultural activitytaking place on these parcels? Exhibit 3 below summarizes the future land use of these parcels.Most acreage classified as agricultural has a Planned Development (PD) future land use.Parcels with the PD future land use have already been entitled by the submittal of a land useplan. Therefore, it is presumable that these parcels are just “holding” until they get developed. Asimilar argument could be made for properties with Activity Center Mixed Use and ActivityCenter Residential future land uses in the International Drive area, which can only be developedas planned Planned Developments. In fact, most of the parcels within these future land useOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 6 of 36 Planning Division
  7. 7. districts have Timberland (54’s) or Pasture Land (61-63) DOR codes. A similar pattern occurswith parcels designated with other nonresidential future land uses, such as Commercial, Office,and Industrial. Exhibit 3: Total Acres by Future land Use for land Classified Agricultural within the USA Total Future Land Use Acres Planned Development 6,145.20 Industrial 3,069.73 Low/Low Medium Density Residential 2,645.54 Other/Mixed* 1,915.16 Activity Center Mixed Use/Activity Center Residential 1,180.05 Medium/High Density 374.23 Commercial/Office 117.21 *Includes parcels with more than one future land use category and parcels with CVC and Rural Future Land Use Source: Orange County GIS, 2008Then there is the argument for small agricultural operations that usually cater to the organicmarket. These small farms have been on the rise during the past several years (USDA, 2007).The extent to which this is happening in the Orange County area is not well-defined. However,there are more than 2,000 parcels with single family residential future land uses that have anagricultural land use designation per the DOR codes. They show more diverse range of codesthat also includes citrus groves, citrus, and ornamentals. A similar situation occurs within themunicipalities, except for the City of Orlando, which shows a high number of parcels in pastureland. Comparing the amount of agricultural land with the type of agricultural operations andproducts harvested in Orange County would be beneficial, but is outside of the scope of thisanalysis.Number and Type of OperationsAccording to the 2007 Census of Agriculture, the total value of agricultural products sold inOrange County was $269,920,000. Orange County ranks ninth in the State of Florida and 184thin the nation in the total value of agricultural products. The top agricultural commodities pervalue in Orange County are nursery, greenhouse, and floriculture ($237,605,000); cattle andcalves ($2,683,000); and other animals and other animal products ($884,000). Orange Countyhad 825 farms, with a median size of 10 acres. Exhibit 4 depicts the total number of farms bysize (USDA, 2007). It shows that small farms are overly predominant in Orange County. Thistrend is similar to the State of Florida and the rest of the nation.The predominance of small farms in Orange County helps somewhat to support the argumentthat organic farms may be occurring within our area, as discussed in the previous section.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 7 of 36 Planning Division
  8. 8. Moreover, the county’s farm typology also supports this premise. Farm typology classifies farmsby their number of sales and the operator’s occupation (USDA, 2007). Twenty six percent ofOrange County farms make less than $1,000 in annual sales (USDA, 2007). This type of farmhas had the highest growth at the national level. For these farmers, agriculture might serve as away to provide some extra income, rather than being the primary way of supporting theirhousehold. In fact, only 47 percent of Orange County operators named farming as their primaryoccupation (USDA, 2007). Exhibit 4: Number of Farms by Size in Orange County, Florida 2007 400 300 356 342 200 100 127 0 1 to 9 10 to 49 50 and over Acres per Farm Source: USDA Census of Agriculture, 2007According to the Census of Agriculture, there is a variety of agricultural products produced inOrange County. Exhibit 5 categorizes the local farming operations using the North AmericanIndustry Code System (NAICS). With 257 operations, the leading agricultural industry inOrange County is the Green House, Nursery and Floriculture (NAICS 1114) sector. Theseestablishments grow crops under a roof cover where they are sheltered from direct sunlight anddrastic weather changes. The majority of businesses in this category produce ferns and otherflowers, which are not food products.Therefore, the highest food producing industry in Orange County is the Fruit and Tree NutFarming sector. There were almost 200 operations in 2007. Establishments within this sectorinclude orange groves and other type of citrus groups, which dominated the Central Floridalandscape for several years. Other leading food sectors are Beef Cattle Farming and Ranching,Animal Aquaculture and Other animal production sectors with 142 establishments each. Thereare also less than 20 operations of each of the following farming operations: Hogs and Pigs(16), Sheep and Goats (15), Poultry and Eggs (13), Dairy Cattle (2), vegetables (6) and othercropsOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 8 of 36 Planning Division
  9. 9. The next part of the report gives a description of the main agricultural commodities produced inOrange County. It also reveals the areas of Orange County where these agricultural activitiesare concentrated. Agricultural parcels were mapped using the Property Appraiser’s DOR codes. Exhibit 5: Agricultural Operations by NAICS Code in Orange County, FL, 2007 Aquaculture and other animal production (1125,11290) 142 Sheep and Goat Farming (1124) 15 Poultry and Egg Production (1123) 13 Hog and Pig Farming (1122) 16 Dairy Cattle and Milk Production (11212) 2 Beef Cattle Farming and Ranching (12111) 174 Other Crop Farming (1119) 12 Greenhouse, Nursery, and Floriculture (1114) 257 Fruit and Tree Nut Farming (1113) 188 Vegetable and Melon Farming (1112) 6 0 100 200 300 Source: USDA Census of Agriculture, 2002Citrus Citrus became a prominent agricultural use in Orange County after the opening of the first commercial citrus nursery at Star Lake in 1870. In 1880, the railroad came to Central Florida, expanding the market area of the citrus industry. By 1890, Florida’s citrus industry consisted of approximately 114,800 acres. Orange County remained one the biggest producers of citrus in Florida until the 1970s. Throughout theyears, citrus production has been severely affected by cold fronts. The Christmas 1983 freezewas particularly devastating to the local citrus industry. The Central Florida Freeze RecoveryTask Force estimated that local citrus acreage lost more than $58 million dollars in taxablevalue that year. To avoid these weather concerns, most of the new citrus production has shiftedto south Florida counties, including Hendry, Martin, and Charlotte. Nevertheless, citrusproduction still ranks as Orange County’s second most important crop. Local growers produced1.79 million boxes of fruit in the 2005-2006 season. The last Agricultural Census counted 191citrus farms in Orange County, a decrease of about 27 percent when compared with theOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 9 of 36 Planning Division
  10. 10. previous Census. Exhibit 6 depicts some of the citrus agricultural products that were harvestedin Orange County in 2007. Exhibit 6: Type of Citrus Products Harvested in Orange County in 2007 Citrus Item Bearing Farms Grapefruit 33 Oranges 179 Tangelos 14 Tangerines 35 Temples 4 Source: USDA Agricultural Census 2007Five categories of citrus fruits are commercially grown in Orange County: oranges (sweet),grapefruit, tangerines (mandarins), Local farmers also cultivate hybrids, such as tangelos(tangerines with grapefruit) and temples. Citrus growers often favor orange cultivation over othercitrus products, because of the fruit’s pleasing flavor, ease of production, suitability for a varietyof types of processing, and higher net returns. Sweet oranges can be further classified by fruitcharacteristics: round, navel, blood and acidless. Tangerines, also known as mandarins, areknown for having a peel that separates easily from the fruit flesh. Their commercial productionhas several disadvantages when compared to other citrus products. Fruits are easily damagedduring the harvesting, packing, and shipping processes. Another problem with this crop is itsuneven production yields. One year, a grove can produce a large crop of uneconomically smallfruit and a very light crop of large fruit the next year. However, they tend to be more tolerant tofreezes.Since the 1870s, citrus has been grown in two principal ridges on the western part of the Countynear the Florida aquifer recharge areas. Exhibit 7 shows the general location of citrus groves inOrange County by type. According to the Property Appraiser, Orange County had more than14,000 acres classified as citrus land in 2008. Ninety two percent of these parcels were withinunincorporated Orange County. Moreover, the number of acres used to harvest grapefruit andmixed groves does not appear to be very significant.As noted previously, citrus trees are very susceptible to changing weather conditions, whichcould affect the yield of a whole grove. Moreover, the age of the groves is also an importantfactor when determining the health of the industry. The Property Appraiser classifies groves bythe effective age of the grove. To reduce the number of categories, staff consolidated theinformation into three main categories: early, (0 to 15 year groves), mature (16 to 30 yeargroves), and declining (36 to 41 year groves). Most groves in unincorporated Orange CountyOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 10 of 36 Planning Division
  11. 11. could be characterized as mature and are between 16 and 20 years of age. This means thatthey will have about 20 years to keep producing fruit. Exhibit 7: Location of Citrus Groves by Type in Orange County, 2008 Source: Orange County GIS, 2008The long term continuity and vitality of the local citrus industry, however, depends upon theplanting of new trees to supplant the oldest groves. It is worrisome that only 11 percent of thecitrus groves in unincorporated Orange County are early groves. Moreover, some of the largestgroves are located in southwest Orange County, within the Horizon West planning area (Exhibit8).Horizon West is a new community of mixed-use villages designed to reflect classic principles ofGarden Cities and New Urbanism (Testerman and Torres, 2004) This area has been designatedas one of Orange County’s activity centers and is expected to have over 50,000 residents byOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 11 of 36 Planning Division
  12. 12. 2030 (Kilponen, 2006). The largest groves within the villages are owned by constructioncompanies, so there would not be much agricultural activity in that area in the future. Exhibit 8: Citrus Groves within Horizon West Villages Source: Orange County GIS, 2008Cattle Farming and Ranching Much like the citrus industry, cattle raising and ranching was a strong influence in the formation of Orange County and the Central Florida region. In 1843, Aaron Jernigan brought about 700 head of cattle into present day Orange County. He soon was joined by other pioneer families like the Townsends, the Harts, the Summerlins and the Jernigans. Some of these homestead families established small herds in theeastern Orange County communities of Fort Christmas and the Bithlo area. It did not take longfor cattle farming to become an important agricultural industry. During the Civil War period,Florida was a supplier of meat for Confederate troops, and it was only second to Texas in theper capita value of livestock in the South, averaging $32.92 per person” (Akerman, 1976). Thecity of Orlando played an important part in the Confederate cattle drives, as it was located onthe main trail for those drives coming north from the Kissimmee prairies.Despite being one of the State’s most important agricultural activities, cattle raising andranching have always been mired in production concerns. Originally, most cattlemen dependedon wild scrub cattle, which tended to be smaller than other cattle. Moreover, the animals wereraised in the open range, which made it difficult for the animals to gain weight. The introductionOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 12 of 36 Planning Division
  13. 13. of new cattle breeds and closing of the open ranges by law helped to somewhat improve thequality of Florida’s cattle. However, the state’s production continued to lag behind that of othercattle-producing states. While Florida produced about 40 pounds of beef per acre, other cattlefarming states produced 200 to 500 pounds per acre (ECFRC, 1963). This was also becausemost local cattle farms remained small operations, even though the industry needed morecapital and better managerial practices. The cost of feeding the animals was also a problem. Toreduce costs, most farmers had to import large quantities of feed and forage or ship two-yearold cattle to other states where grain prices were lower for fattening.Small operations still continue to predominate in Orange County. More then 50 percent of theOrange County cattle farms have between 1 and 9 animals. Exhibit 9 summarizes the numberof operations by inventory, according to the US Agricultural Census. Exhibit 9: Number of Cattle and Ranching Operations by Inventory Category Number of Farms 1- 9 127 10-19 53 20-49 17 50- 99 11 100+ 13 Source: USDA Agricultural Census, 2007The most recent Agricultural Census found that there were 221 cattle farms in Orange County in2007, with an inventory of 11,073 animals. This number includes all type of operations, such asbeef farms, calve producing farms, and milk cows. More than 80 percent of these cattle farmsproduce beef cows. While the number of beef farms increased from the last Census, thenumber of dairy farms decreased slightly, part of a statewide trend. According to the FloridaDepartment of Agriculture, the number of milk producers is declining about 6 percent per year(Barnett, 2008). Orange County only had two dairy farms in 2007.While the impact of the cattle industry on the county’s overall economy is small when comparedto some other business activities, its impact on the county’s pastoral appearance and sense ofopen space is still significant. Grazing land covers over 115,000 acres in Orange County. Asseen on Exhibit 10, the major concentrations of grazing land can be found in southeast OrangeCounty.The Orange County Property Appraiser classifies grazing land into four categories: improvedpasture, improved/hay production, semi-improved pasture, and native pasture. For purposes ofthis study, both types of improved pasture were consolidated into one category. ImprovedOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 13 of 36 Planning Division
  14. 14. pasture is grazing land that is drained and receives varying degrees of fertilization to enhancethe quality and yield of its forage. This type of pasture is primarily harvested by grazing animals(Florida Center for Environmental Studies, n.d.). The native vegetation has often been replacedwith non-native species, which in Orange County are mainly Bahia grass, Bermuda grass,limpers, and pangola grass (Doolittle and Sechentrager, 1989). Improved pastures are fairlyspread across the County, with no particular areas of concentration. Exhibit 10: Location of Pasture Land by Type in Orange County, 2008 Source: Orange County GIS, 2008A semi-improved pasture has been impacted by human conversion, but receives very lowmanagement inputs. These areas might be abandoned improved pastures or cropland areaswhere much of the woody vegetation has been removed. There are less than 10,000 acres ofsemi-improved pasture in Orange County, with some big concentrations north of East ColonialDrive and south of SR 528.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 14 of 36 Planning Division
  15. 15. Native pasture, the most abundant in Orange County, is forest land that had most of its treesremoved to promote the growth of shrub vegetation occurring at the site. The vegetation ismanaged for its forage value through the use of grazing management principles (FCES, n.d). Ascan be seen on Exhibit 5, most of the County’s native pasture land is located in southeastOrange County, east of the Econlockhatchee River. This land is part of the vast Deseret Ranch,which spreads over three Central Florida counties.From a land development perspective, there is a notion that grazing land is usually a “holding”use before the arrival of urban development. This assertion is supported by some of the datafound in this study. As discussed previously on this report, there are over 15,000 acres inOrange County currently classified as agricultural land that have a non agricultural future landuse designation. Over 60 percent of these parcels are classified as pasture land. These includeseveral of the improved pastures in Orange County, and about half of them have less than 10acres. This leads us to believe that these might be “holdover” parcels just waiting for the ownerto develop them. The high number of farms with less than 10 animals also helps to support thisargument. Another important aspect of pasture land is that, because of its location in thesoutheast part of the County, it is currently experiencing development pressure. At this time, thispart of the County is experiencing a lot of development pressure. This would certainly present achallenge to the future of cattle farming in Orange County.Other Agricultural Products As discussed in the previous sections, Orange County’s agricultural production is dominated by three industries: nursery and floriculture production, citrus, and cattle farming. Besides these products, Orange County farms also produce a variety of other agricultural commodities. These include both crop and animal raising farms. Because these enterprises tend to be small operations, it is very difficult to find information about them.The 2007 Census found that local farms cultivated a variety of fruits and vegetables. Exhibit 4depicts the number of operations by the type of crop harvested. A farm can cultivate a variety ofagricultural products. The Agricultural Census also identified 176 operations dedicated to theraising of animals. While most of these operations are horse ranches, there are also other typesof livestock raised such as sheep, goats, alpacas, llamas, and pigs. Much like the crop farms,Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 15 of 36 Planning Division
  16. 16. these are small operations that usually cater to the organic market. There are also several farmsthat are dedicated for the production of animal products, including eggs, honey, and meat. Aquick search on localharvest.org website, which lists local food and organic food producersacross the country, listed several small vegetable farms, a honey farm, and an egg/chickenfarm. However, some of these farms also produce their products at a larger scale. For example,Froehlich Gator Farm, located in the unincorporated area of Christmas, harvests between 2,000and 3,000 alligators per year for meat, skins and skulls.Agriculture and Food ProductionAccording to the USDA Agricultural Census, Orange County produces a diverse variety of cropsand animals. Citrus and beef are the dominant food products, have the most cultural andhistorical significance, and take up most of the agricultural land. As discussed previously, bothof these industries are subject to high levels of pressure, because of weather conditions andurban development. Moreover, these are export industries, so their impact in the local foodsystems is minimal.Based on the local land use pattern and expected population growth, the role of these two cropswill continue to diminish in favor of smaller farms and products. There are several reasons thatsupport this argument. First, the current fragmentation of agricultural land leads to theconclusion that the median size of farms in Orange County will continue to decrease in thefuture. As land continues to be subdivided, farmers would look to substitute crops that could beproduced efficiently in smaller lots. Moreover, the increase in international competition and therise of the local food movement also favor this trend.FOOD PROCESSING AND DISTRIBUTIONThe next links in the food systems chain are food processing and food distribution sectors. Froma food systems perspective, a strong link between local agriculture and food processingindustries is ideal. Much like in the rest of the United States, very little of the value of thisindustry relies on locally-grown produce. Most of the raw material used in local processing isshipped from other areas. Still, the total economic impact of these industries is highlysignificant. The Orlando Farm Bureau estimates that these industries create 19,474 jobs, andwere responsible for 3.17 billion in sales, and 623 million in payroll (2007).Exhibit 11 shows the location of food manufacturing and wholesale distribution operations inOrange County. Most food operating businesses are located within three intersections: WestColonial Drive and S.R 429 in the City of Winter Garden, West Colonial Drive and North OrangeOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 16 of 36 Planning Division
  17. 17. Blossom Trail in Orlando, and Florida Turnpike and SR 528 in Unincorporated Orange County.Most of these food operations are small and have less than 50 employees. Exhibit 11: Food Processing and Distribution Operations by Firm Size Source: InfoUSA, 2005Food ProcessingFood processing or manufacturing is the transformation of livestock and crops into products forintermediate and final consumption. The NAICS category system distinguishes the individualindustry groups by the origin of the raw materials used in the creation of the products, whichcould be of vegetable or animal origin. The products manufactured by these establishments aresold to wholesalers and retailers for final distribution to the consumers. Some retail bakeries thatdo not sell their items for immediate consumption are included within this category. However, forthe purpose of this report, these establishments were taken out of the analysis. There were 50such establishments in 2005. The food processing group also includes businesses that produceOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 17 of 36 Planning Division
  18. 18. food for animal consumption. The sole company in our area within this category was alsoomitted from this analysis.To understand the value of the food processing industry, it is important to know thatmanufacturing has played a minor role in Orange County’s economy. In 2005, there were only1,377 establishments dedicated to manufacturing in Orange County. Of these, only sevenpercent were food processing industries, and most are small establishments. Moreover, verylittle of the value of the food processing industry relies in locally grown produce.This was not always the case. According to the ECFRPC, wholesale trade (fruit and vegetablepackage and shipping) and manufacturing (food and kindred products) represented 8.2 percentand 6.5 percent of all the County’s jobs in 1940. Several food processing machinery operationsand can manufacturing plants operated here at this time, due to the introduction of frozen fruitconcentrates. Some of these companies were Crown Cork and Seal, R.C. Can Co. andReynolds Metals in the City of Orlando, and Continental Can in the City of Winter Garden. Twoother local companies, American Machinery and Can Rite, produced machinery for canneriesand citrus sorting and shipment plants. Today, only two of these companies remain in our area,and they have mostly diversified to manufacture other type of products. Exhibit 12: Number of Food Manufacturing Operations in Orange County, 2008 Other Food Manufacturing (3119) 14 Bakeries and Tortilla Manufacturing (3118) 9 Animal Slaughtering (3116) and Sea Food 7 Preparation (3117) Dairy Product Manufacturing (3115) 4 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty 5 Food (3114) Confectionary (3113) and Beverage (3121) 8 0 5 10 15 Source: InfoUSA, 2005; Orange County GIS 2009According to the InfoUSA database, there are 47 food-processing operations in Orange County.These can be further classified into eight major categories according their NAICS code, as seenon Exhibit 12. With 14 operations, the Other Food category had the highest number ofestablishments in Orange County. This was followed by Bakeries and Tortilla Manufacturing,and Confectionary and Beverage Manufacturing.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 18 of 36 Planning Division
  19. 19. The fact that the Other Food Manufacturing category is the dominant food processing industry inOrange County speaks volumes about our food system. Industries within this category use adifferent variety of production processes. The products include snack food, coffee and tea,concentrate syrup, condiment, and spices, and other miscellaneous products. All of theingredients on these items come from distant places. Furthermore, these are often heavilyprocessed food products.Local companies within this sector can be further divided by the products that they manufacture.There are three snack food manufacturing establishments, two coffee roasters, two companiesthat create seasonings, and seven that create miscellaneous foods. Local examples of thesecompanies include Chef Creations, a provider of soup, sauce, and specialty products andCulinary Concepts, a producer of compound butters, soups, sauces, and shelf table products forprofessional chefs. H & H Products Company, in Unincorporated Orange County manufacturesjuices, beverage concentrates and syrups.The second food operator category with the highest number of establishments is the Bakeriesand Tortilla Manufacturing, which is comprised of establishments that produce fresh and frozenbread and other bakery products. For this research, staff removed retail bakeries from thiscategory, because their items are mostly prepared for immediate consumption and sale. Oneof the highest food processing employers in Orange County is the Merita Bread Bakery, asubsidiary of Interstate Bakeries Corporation, maker of Wonder Bread and Twinkies. The MeritaBread operation produces mainly sandwich breads.Locally, the highest food employer in Orange County is the Coca Cola Bottling Company. TheirMercy Drive location had over 500 employees in 2005 (InfoUSA). This facility produces anddistributes 34 million cases of several Coke products through Central Florida. In addition to thisfacility, this soft drink manufacturer has two other operations in Orlando and Maitland.Orange County also has several operations dedicated to the processing of animals andbyproducts. These are small operations employing between 1 and 25 people. There are sixoperations that fall within the Animal Slaughtering and Processing: (NAICS 3116). Theseinclude several butcher shops, such as Circle R Beef Inc.., Great Western Meats, Inc.., OrlandoFood Services, and Ali-Halal Meat. Orlando Food Services, with a 66,000 square foot facility inSand Lake Road, is a regional meat processor that caters to the hotel and convention business.The company’s products are served at several hotels and restaurants, including the Marriott,Ritz Carlton, Shingle Creek and Gaylord Palms. Another specialized meat processing operationOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 19 of 36 Planning Division
  20. 20. is the Ali Halal slaughter house located in northeast Orange County. This is the only Muslimslaughterhouse in the Central Florida region. There is also an animal rendering company inOrlando called Griffin Industries, which collects waste by-products from slaughterhouses,packing plants, butcher shops, supermarkets, hotels and restaurants to turn them into animalfeeds, pet food ingredients and organic fertilizers. Exhibit 13: Location of Food Manufacturing Operations in Orange CountySource: InfoUSA, 2005Unlike what was discussed earlier in the agriculture section, it seems that a good amount of thecitrus crop cultivated in our area does not end up as juice, but is processed through packingplants. Conoley Citrus in the City of Winter Garden, Red Hill Groves in Orlando, and HollieannaGroves in Maitland are dedicated to fruit packing and shipping of fresh citrus fruits, like oranges,tangerines and grapefruit. Winter Garden is also home to an operating unit of Louis DreyfusCommodities, the third largest orange juice processor in the world. The company sells frozenretail or bulk concentrate.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 20 of 36 Planning Division
  21. 21. Finally, there are other food producing companies that cater toward naturopathic and vegansectors. Galaxy Nutritional Foods, Inc. develops plant-based cheese alternatives, organic dairyand other organic and natural food products for grocery and natural foods retailers. ForeverYoung Formulations produces a specialty line of health foods.Exhibit 13 shows the location of all the food operations identified by our study. Most of thesemanufacturing operations are located within the City of Orlando and the City of Winter Garden.Most of these companies are within the Confectionary, Beverage, Fruit and Vegetable, andCommercial Bakeries sectors. Interestingly, majority of meat processing operations are locatedin the unincorporated area.Whole Sale Food DistributionThe food distribution system is the conduit through which food products move from farms andfactories to the consumers. It has become a key stage in the food system linkage, becausemost food is grown in rural areas. The distribution system is large and elaborate and includesdifferent sectors that provide a range of specialized services, such as transportation, post-harvest handling, processing, storage, and wholesale sales. The efficiency of this system hascontinued to provide for a variety of food that is plentiful at a relatively inexpensive price, whencompared to other parts of the world.Unlike with manufacturing, which is not a strong economic sector, the food wholesale sectorcontains a lot of operations in Orange County. Located in the middle of the state, OrangeCounty has a strong wholesale distribution sector. Moreover, this sector has benefitted frombeing close to the large hospitality and health care sectors, businesses that require theconsistent supply of fresh food products to serve their customers.Orange County has 122 establishments dedicated to the wholesale distribution of groceries andother related products. For this study, these business operations were classified into four majorcategories (Exhibit 14). Most wholesale food companies are engaged in the distribution of OtherGrocery Products and Confectionary, and General Line Grocery Items. Most of theseestablishments are engaged in the distribution of highly processed products, such as cannedand dried foods, salted and roasted peanuts, popcorn, chips, soft drinks and syrups. The nextcategory with the most distribution operations are the Dairy Products and Packaged Frozenfood sectors.The County also has some business operations dedicated to the distribution of fresh food.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 21 of 36 Planning Division
  22. 22. These are firms that distribute produce, such as Fruit and Vegetables. This sector also includesanimal product distributors, which can be further classified as Poultry and Poultry Products, Fishand Sea Food, and Meat and Meat Products. Exhibit 14: Food Wholesale Distribution Operations in Orange County, 2009 Fruit & Vegetable (42448) 29 M eat & M eat P ro ducts (42447), Fish and Sea Fo o d 12 (42446), and P o ultry P ro ducts Co nfectio nery (42445) and 50 Other Gro cery P ro ducts Dairy P ro ducts (42443) and P ackaged Fro zen Fo o d 30 (42442) 0 10 20 30 40 50 Source: InfoUSA data, 2005; Orange County GIS, 2009When compared to other food sectors, the Fish and Sea Food Merchant Wholesalers industrymerits discussion, because of its high location quotient (3.43). This means that most of theseoperations export their services, and this is the only food industry related operation that hassuch a significant number. Some of these businesses are Bar Harbor Lobster Company, Gary’sSea Food Specialties, and Lombardi’s Sea Food, Inc.One interesting thing about the distribution operations is that over 20 of them also perform sometype of manufacturing within their facilities. This is especially true with some companies thatproduce bread products, like Toufayan, Bagel King, and New York International BreadCompany. These companies distribute their products to clients within the institutional, hotel andretail sectors. Other businesses within this category are the Frito-Lay plant and the PepsiBottling plant in unincorporated Orange County.Exhibit 15 shows the distribution of whole sale businesses in Orange County. The distributionof these businesses is similar to that of the manufacturing businesses. A good number ofbusinesses are located within the Ocoee-Winter Garden Area (next to S.R. 429). Most of thesebusinesses are fresh food distributors of food and vegetable and poultry products.There are several areas within the City of Orlando with a high concentration of wholesaleOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 22 of 36 Planning Division
  23. 23. businesses. One is in North West Orlando between North Orange Blossom Trail and WestColonial Drive, another is near the intersection of Interstate 4 and S.R. 408 close to DowntownOrlando and the other is near Interstate 4 by Florida’s Turnpike. Exhibit 15: Location of Wholesale Operations in Orange CountySource: InfoUSA, 2005The highest concentration of food distribution companies occurs in unincorporated OrangeCounty. The most notable concentration occurs between South Orange Blossom Trail andFlorida’s Turnpike, close to SR 528. There are also a six businesses along the SR 528 closer toOrlando International Airport. Finally, there are also several food distribution businesses west ofSemoran Boulevard. Notice that most of these distribution businesses are located near majortransportation routes, such as S.R 408, SR 429, SR 528, Inter State 4, and arterial roads, likeColonial Drive, Orange Blossom Trail, and John Young Parkway. This is because wholesalebusinesses use trucks to transport their goods, and thus depend on easy access to major roads.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 23 of 36 Planning Division
  24. 24. FOOD INDUSTRIES LAND USE CONTEXTThe previous sections showed the distribution of the agricultural, food processing, andwholesale distribution sectors in Orange County. When evaluating any type of economicoperations, economic development planners usually try to look for linkages between severalindustries that serve each other. These concentrations are often referred to as clusters, which iscomposed of a group of firms and related institutions that are located near one another anddraw productive advantage from their mutual proximity and connections (Cortright, 2006) Exhibit 16: Citrus Activity Centers in Orange County Sources: Infousa, 2005, Orange County Property AppraiserBased on this description, there is not a particular cluster of food industry in Orange County.However, as can be appreciated from Exhibit 16, there are several concentrated pockets ofcitrus activity in the west part of the County along SR 429 and SR 441. These centers of activityare comprised of citrus groves, processing plants, and wholesale packing operations. There isalso a series of supporting operations such as fertilizer manufacturers, farming equipment andsupply whole sale operations. It is difficult to know whether these operations are there solely tosupport the citrus sector though.ANALYISIS OF ORANGE COUNTY’S FOOD PRODUCTIONThis paper studied the three parts of the food productions system: agriculture, processing, andOrange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 24 of 36 Planning Division
  25. 25. distribution. Based on the information found in this report, several assumptions can be madeabout the local food production systems and its impact to Orange County’s food systems. • Even though it is an urban county, Orange County farmers produce over 40 types of crop and animal products. A factor that may influence this variety may be the small size of farms in Orange County, with 43 percent of them being smaller than 10 acres. Larger farms are probably dedicated to the production of citrus and cattle. • Almost 31 percent of all local farms are nurseries. While some of these businesses may produce food crops, the majority of them are dedicated to the production of flowers and foliage. Therefore, Citrus and Beef Cattle Ranching can be considered as Orange County’s predominant food crop. Most agricultural land is dedicated to cattle ranching operations, with over 115,000 acres. • Several of the largest parcels of agricultural land are within areas proposed for development. There are 4,000 acres of groves in Horizon West, which represents about a third of all the citrus land in Orange County. A big segment of pastureland is within the proposed Magnolia Ranch Development of Regional Impact. There are also a several “holdover” agricultural parcels within the Urban Service Area that might be developed in upcoming years. • There is not a strong link between local agricultural products and the food processing operations in Orange County. Most local food manufacturers produce flour products, so their inputs come from outside the County. There are only three meatpacking operations in Orange County. Furthermore, the County’s urban nature makes it more difficult for the creation of additional slaughtering farms. Finally, there does not appear to be a strong link between the food processing and distribution sectors either. • Orange County’s agricultural production is not close to meeting the local food demand. The high number of wholesale merchant operations that distribute fresh foods supports the idea that most of the food comes from outside the County. • West Orange County has several areas with concentrations of citrus groves and companies dedicated to citrus processing, distribution, and support operations. The relationships between these operations are not completely clear. Several of the supporting companies (fertilizer and garden supply stores) may also serve the nursery and floriculture businesses. Therefore, these concentrations are not referred to as clusters.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 25 of 36 Planning Division
  26. 26. Like much of the United States, the food production system in Orange County could bedescribed as “broken”, in that there is not a direct linkage between the agriculture, processing,and food distribution sectors. However, this research presents a glimpse of the food productionindustry in Orange County, which, overall, is relatively strong. The food production sectorprovides thousands of local jobs, and some of these companies have been able to use OrangeCounty’s central location to their advantage and find niches to fill.It is wise to recognize that some of the factors affecting the local food system are out of localcontrol. A stronger food policy at the state and federal level would probably contribute more toimproving the issues in our local food system. The recent approval of the new Farm Bill is apositive step on this effort, because it gives more incentives to the producers of crops other thancotton, corn and wheat. This could help to boost some of the smaller farm operations and theproduction of food to be consumed locally. However, there are also steps that localgovernments can follow to help to boost local food production and access to fresh foods.Economic development officials should work to attract more food processing operations to theCounty. As the guardians of local land use, Local planners could examine whether there is anadequate supply of land to and evaluate policies that support agricultural preservation and localfood production. Zoning districts should be flexible to allow certain food production and increaseaccess to fresh foods. Some of these topics will be examined in future papers in the FoodSystem series.Orange County Food Production White Paper Growth Management DepartmentOctober 2009 Page 26 of 36 Planning Division
  27. 27. ReferencesAkerman, Joe A. Florida Cowman: A History of Florida Cattle Raising (1976). Jimbob Printing Inc. Madison, FL (Florida Cattlemen’s Association)Attaway, John A. A History of Florida Citrus Freezes. (1997). Florida Science Source Inc. Lake Alfred: FLBreitenstein, D. Agriculture hanging on in Florida: but development, world economy threaten. The News Press. Retrieved June 6, 2007, from http://www.newspress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070606/BUSINESS/706060337Chamberlain, Alex S., Durak Michael L., Gerken, John L., Vigh, Charles A. Agricultural Development in East Central Florida (1967) East Central Florida Regional Council 1965 Research Series. Titusville, FLCorthright, J. Making Sense of Clusters: Regional Competitiveness and Economic Development (2006). Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program.Doolitle, James A. and Schellentrager, Greg. (1989)Soil Survey of Orange County Florida. United States Department of Agriculture: Soil Conservation Service, Orlando.Evans, Craig (2007).The Contributions of Agribusiness to Orange County, Florida. Orange County Farm Bureau. Orlando: FLHaner-Dorr, N. Coke, city agree to expansion deal. Orlando Business Journal. Originally published on September 19, 2003. Retrieved on May 19, 2009 from http://orlando.bizjournals.com/orlando/stories/2003/09/22/story2.html?surround=etfHodges, Alan W., Rahmani, Mohammad, Wilkey, W. David (2008). Economic Contributions of Agricultural, Food Manufacturing, and Natural Resources Industries in Florida in 2006. University of Florida Institute of Agricultural and Food Sciences. Gainesville: FLinfoUSA Database License Group. (2005). Orange County Business Leads Report . Database provided by Metro Plan Orlando thJackson, Larry K. and Davies, Frederick S. Citrus Growing in Florida (4 Edition) (1999). University Press of Florida. Gainesville; FL
  28. 28. Kelly,L. It’s now easier to find halal meat. St. Petersburg Times. Originally published on March 10, 2006. Retrieved on May 19, 2009 from http://www.sptimes.com/2006/03/10/Northoftampa/Its now easieri to fi.shtmlPothukuchi, K., and Kaufman, J. L. (2000). The food system: a stranger to the planning field. Journal of the American Planning Association, 66(2).Reed T. (2007). Florida citrus land yielding fast to housing and tree diseases. South Florida Sun Sentinel. Retrieved October 19, 2007, from http://www.sun-sentinel.com/business/sfl flzcitrus1019nboct19,0,1443362,print.storyTesterman, C. and Torres, A. Horizon West Orange County Florida. (Fall /Winter 2004). Terrain.org, 15. Retrieved from http://www.terrain.org/unsprawl/14/Thompson E. Jr., Harper, A. M., Kraus, S. (2008) Think Globally-Eat Locally. American Farmland Trust. Retrieved September 25, 2008 from www.farmland.org/programs/states/ca.U.S. Department of Agriculture (2002) National agricultural statistics survey: Orange County, FL. Retrieved March, 2007, from http://www.nass.usda.gov/Census/Pull_Data_Census.jsp
  29. 29. APPENDIX TABLES Number of Operations by Food Crop in Orange County, FL 2007 Food Products Number of Operations Apples 1 Beans, snap 1 Cabbage 4 Citrus 191 Cucumbers 2 Forage, hay 22 Grain storage 2 Grapefruit 34 Grapes 4 Lettuce 3 Mushrooms 1 Non-citrus, excluding berries 5 Oranges 182 Orchards 196 Pecans 3 Pumpkins 3 Radishes 3 Squash 3 Sweet corn 1 Tangelos 14 Tangerines 35 Temples 4 Tomatoes 1 Tree nuts 3 Vegetable seeds 3 Vegetables 8 Vegetables, including fresh cut herbs, under protection 3 Source: USDA Agricultural Census, 2007
  30. 30. Number of Operations by Animal Farm in Orange County, FL 2007 Food Products Number of OperationsAlpacas 5Aquaculture 6Bait fish 1Cattle 127Chickens, broilers (meat) 5Chickens, layers 9Chickens, pullets (replacement) 1Ducks 10Geese 1Hogs 34Honey 5Llamas 1Milk, including other dairy products 2Pheasants 1Pigeons and Squab 1Poultry, other 8Sheep, Goats, and products 34Turkeys 5Source: USDA Agricultural Census, 2007
  31. 31. Department of Revenue Property Use CodesCode Description6100 Grazing land - Improved pasture6101 Grazing land - Improved / hay production6200 Grazing land - Semi-improved pasture6300 Grazing land - Native pasture6600 Miscellaneous orchard / grove fruit6610 Orange grove - 00 to 10 year effective age - New, above new, starting to mature6611 Orange grove - 11 to 15 year effective age - Starting to produce6612 Orange grove - 16 to 20 year effective age - Producing economically6613 Orange grove - 21 to 25 year effective age - Producing at highest level6614 Orange grove - 26 to 30 year effective age - Producing well6615 Orange grove - 31 to 35 year effective age - Starting to decline6616 Orange grove - 36 to 40 year effective age - Becoming uneconomical6617 Orange grove - 41 and over - Reached end of its economic life6620 Grapefruit grove - 00 to 10 year effective age - New, above new, starting to mature6621 Grapefruit grove - 11 to 15 year effective age - Starting to produce6622 Grapefruit grove - 16 to 20 year effective age - Producing economically6623 Grapefruit grove - 21 to 25 year effective age - Producing at highest level6624 Grapefruit grove - 26 to 30 year effective age - Producing well6625 Grapefruit grove - 31 to 35 year effective age - Starting to decline6626 Grapefruit grove - 36 to 40 year effective age - Becoming uneconomical6627 Grapefruit grove - 41 yr and over effective age - Reached end of economic life6630 Mixed / spec grove - 00 to 10 year effective age - New, above new, starting to mature6631 Mixed / spec grove - 11 to 15 year effective age - Starting to produce6632 Mixed / spec grove - 16 to 20 year effective age - Producing economically6633 Mixed / spec grove - 21 to 25 year effective age - Producing at highest level6634 Mixed / spec grove - 26 to 30 year effective age - Producing well6635 Mixed / spec grove - 31 to 35 year effective age - Starting to decline6636 Mixed / spec grove - 36 to 40 year effective age - Becoming uneconomical6637 Mixed / special grove - 41 yr and over effective age - Reached end of economic life6699 Citrus grove cleared due to canker6700 Miscellaneous animals - Goats6716 Miscellaneous fowl - Emus / Ostrich / Duck / etc6730 Apiary / bee yard6801 Horse farm - Bred mare operationSource: Orange County Property Appraisers Website, 2009
  32. 32. Food Processing Operations in Orange County, 2005 NAICS Code and Description Operations Behrs Chocolates311330 Confectionery mfg. from purchased chocolate Anastasia Confections Great Western Meats Inc.311411 Frozen fruit and vegetable Louis Dreyfus Garden Citrus International Fruit Inc.311412 Frozen specialty food mfg. Ginos Pizza311421 Fruit and vegetable canning Conoley Citrus311513 Cheese mfg. Galaxy Nutritional Foods Inc. Molto Ice Cream Glacier Italian Ice311520 Ice cream and frozen dessert mfg. Instant Whip Foods Plume Deveau Inc. Circle R Beef Inc.311611 Animal, except poultry, slaughtering Orlando Foodservice311612 Meat processed from carcasses Ali Meat Industry311613 Rendering and meat byproduct processing Griffin Industries Inc.311615 Poultry processing Land Poultry Inc.311712 Fresh and frozen seafood processing Seafood Brokers Otis Spunkmeyer Inc. Flippers Pizza Wholesale Merita Bread Bakery Croissant Chateau Ect Bakery Ya Yas Spanish Bakery & Deli Douce France Bakery Inc. Meyers Bakery Bread of Europe311812 Commercial bakeries Orlando International Bakery Wetzels Pretzels LLC Snyders of Hanover311919 Other snack food mfg. Pretzel Twister S and D Coffee Inc.311920 Coffee and tea mfg. Orlando Coffee Roaster H & H Products Co311942 Spice and extract mfg. Jayshree Holdings Inc. C F Sauer Food Svc U K Import Inc. Culinary Concepts Inc. Hacienda Food Products Tapas International Inc.311999 All other misc food mfg. Forever Young Formulations Coca-Cola Bottling Co Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. Coca-Cola Bottling Co312111 Soft drink mfg. Icee Co312130 Wineries Orlando Winery312140 Distilleries White Rock Distillery Inc.Source: infoUSA, 2005
  33. 33. Food Wholesale Merchant Businesses in Orange County FL, 2005 NAICS Code and Description Operations Global Food Industries Swift Convenient Mart Asanti Inc. Gazaly Trading La Bodega Latina Central Wholesale Inc. Howard Wholesale M G & S Imports Food424410 General Line Grocery Del Tropico Food & Beverage Dahlia Enterprises Inc. Hormel Foods Corp Floral Foods Gator Finer Foods US Foodservice Choice Distributors of Orlando Lipten & Co. San Remo Speciality Foods Qwic Wic Food Ctr Inc. Culinary Classics Inc. Mcpherson Atlantic Inc. Contessa Food Products Quantum Distributors Casa Del Parmigiano Harvest Meat Co Frito-Lay Inc. Gold Medals Products Prestige Marketing Sanwa Trading Co Inc. Weyand East Food Svc Que Rico Food La Calanita Sysco Food Svc of Central FL424420 Packaged frozen food Tombstone-Kraft Pizza Co Sunny Morning Food Inc. Cloverland Farms Inc. Edys Grand Ice Cream I Wanna Distribution Co AMCORE Intl Trading Inc.424430 Dairy prodructs Kohr Brothers Frozen Custard Perdue Farms Inc.424440 Poultry products Kellys Foods Inc.424450 Confectionery Awfully Good Candy Klippy Corp Auntie Annes Hand Rolled Soft Auntie Annes Hand Rolled Soft Rainbow Fruit & Nut Co. Tropical Nut &Fruit
  34. 34. Wayne Densch Charities Central Frespak Seafood Corp Garys Seafood Specialties Inc. Bar Harbor Lobster Co Lombardis Seafood Inc. Orlando Premium Seafood424460 Fish and Seafood Elite Food Svc American Bison Natural Meats Colorado Choice Meat Co Inc. Colorado Choice Meat Co Inc.42447005 Meat and meat products Buckhead Beef Co Langley Fruit Co Hoopers Landscape Nursery Inc. Long Farms Inc. A J Sales Co Hollieanna Groves Salesroom Sunkist Growers Inc. Citrus Plus Inc. Third Party Registration Inc. Whites Red Hill Groves Conoley Fruit Harvester Inc. Heller Brothers Packing Corp Holland Properties Inc. Lake Butler Groves Inc. Mc Kinnon Corp Winter Garden Citrus Growers Gourmet Garden World Food Brokers Inc. Tom West Inc. Everett Farm Fresh Produce Emerald Packing Co C W Earls Produce K & R Farms Produce Inc. Raindrop Produce Harvills Produce Co Mr Greenjeans Produce Reds Market Taylor Farms Florida Inc. Kim Lai Shing424480 Fruit and vegetables Marigolds & Marmalade Edible424490 Other grocery products Bagel King Bakery Mid Florida Bakeries New York Intl Bread Co Charlies Gourmet Pastries Tonys Bakery Mickeys Bread Bakeland Bakery Rascals Pastries Michaelangelos Bakery Taqueria Los Primos
  35. 35. Darland Bakery Inc. Flowers Bakery Thrift Store Toufayan Bakery of Florida Inc. Bakery Express of Central Fl Bread Connection Flowers Bakery Thrift Store Snack Attack Vending OBI Food Mart Southeast Atlantic Beverage Schenck Company-Sales-Mktg Discount Beverages Aloma Discount Beverage Havana Cola Inc. Pepsi Bottling Group Premier Beverage the Charmer Az Beverage Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory Illy Caffe North America Inc. Great East Novia Nutritionals Bio Plus Manuka Honey USA Goldenrod Atiaries Mothers Fresh Pasta FactorySource: InfoUSA, 2005

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