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Geoland-EUROGEO conference 2022.pptx

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Geoland-EUROGEO conference 2022.pptx

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Landscape is both a physical reality and the representation that we make of it. It is the face of a land with all its natural and anthropological elements and, at the same time, the feelings and emotions that it arouses in us when we see it. Therefor the European Landscape Convention indicates that assessment of all these different dimensions that exist in landscapes should be considered by public authorities while adopting policies and measures at local, regional, national and international level for protecting, managing and planning landscapes throughout Europe.

With this situation in mind, GEOLAND – an Erasmus+ KA2 Higher Education project -focuses on NATURA 2000 sites, with as goal to establish a learning path for the HE students and professors in order to apply their geospatial analysis knowledge in Landscape monitoring and protection, using digital skills like public participation GIS, and low-cost geoinformatic. In particular the main aim of the project is to develop a web based GIS platform where numerous geospatial data may be uploaded, analyzed and students' opinion about landscape will be asked through questionnaires and crowdsourcing.

The project will thus provide the opportunity to students and professors, being interested in definition and implementation of landscape policies, to play an active part in setting sustainability indicators of desirable landscape quality objectives (LQOs). In addition, GEOLAND will attempt to train the future employees to identify and summarize the environmental and cultural stratification in the examined landscapes through a sophisticated GIS oriented Landscape Character Assessment (LCA) methodology. . In this direction, the project will develop a new methodological framework for monitoring Landscape tailored to the needs of the new digital era, safeguarding thus the inclusive nature of learning opportunities. Moreover, the project will provide training content matching the digital education needs.

Landscape is both a physical reality and the representation that we make of it. It is the face of a land with all its natural and anthropological elements and, at the same time, the feelings and emotions that it arouses in us when we see it. Therefor the European Landscape Convention indicates that assessment of all these different dimensions that exist in landscapes should be considered by public authorities while adopting policies and measures at local, regional, national and international level for protecting, managing and planning landscapes throughout Europe.

With this situation in mind, GEOLAND – an Erasmus+ KA2 Higher Education project -focuses on NATURA 2000 sites, with as goal to establish a learning path for the HE students and professors in order to apply their geospatial analysis knowledge in Landscape monitoring and protection, using digital skills like public participation GIS, and low-cost geoinformatic. In particular the main aim of the project is to develop a web based GIS platform where numerous geospatial data may be uploaded, analyzed and students' opinion about landscape will be asked through questionnaires and crowdsourcing.

The project will thus provide the opportunity to students and professors, being interested in definition and implementation of landscape policies, to play an active part in setting sustainability indicators of desirable landscape quality objectives (LQOs). In addition, GEOLAND will attempt to train the future employees to identify and summarize the environmental and cultural stratification in the examined landscapes through a sophisticated GIS oriented Landscape Character Assessment (LCA) methodology. . In this direction, the project will develop a new methodological framework for monitoring Landscape tailored to the needs of the new digital era, safeguarding thus the inclusive nature of learning opportunities. Moreover, the project will provide training content matching the digital education needs.

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Geoland-EUROGEO conference 2022.pptx

  1. 1. GEOLAND A learning path for HE students and professors Luc Zwartjes, Ghent University, geography department Christos Polykretis Dimitris Alexakis, FORTH Greece Karl Donert, EUROGEO Rafael de Miguel González, University of Zaragoza
  2. 2. Aims • establish a learning path for the Higher Education students and their professors so that they are able to apply their geospatial analysis knowledge in decision-making for landscape management, planning and protection of NATURA 2000 sites across Europe • focus in promoting digital skills like PPGIS (public participation GIS), low-cost geoinformatic tools and the digital readiness of higher education students in the Covid-19 pandemic era.
  3. 3. PARTNERS
  4. 4. Geoland goals Main goals of the GEOLAND: develop • an Educational Handbook for monitoring European Landscape, • a Web based GIS platform where numerous geospatial data may be uploaded and analysed and students’ opinion about landscape will be obtained through questionnaires and crowdsourcing.
  5. 5. Geoland outcomes • O1: Educational Handbook for monitoring European Landscape presenting a homogeneous methodology for educating Higher Education students in studying European Landscape with means of Geoinformatics and citizen science methodology. • O2: Training course – Web-based GIS platform used by Higher Education students and Professors in order to apply Landscape Character Assessment (LCA) for assessing Landscape quality in Natura 2000 zones. • O3: Policy outreach  provide a unique opportunity to Higher Education students to study how European Landscape Convention (ELC) is implemented and adopted in different EU countries. • 04: Online gallery of students work • 05: develop the Digital Readiness Tool, DERT, for the assessment of the digital readiness of the Higher Education students and courses.
  6. 6. Geoland handbook https://bit.ly/3sbJSzp
  7. 7. Formation of the landschape natural processes socio-economic processes natural differentiation decisions and actions land use antropogenic differentiation traditional landscapes recent landscapes NATURAL FACTORS HUMAN FACTORS e.g. Uniformity (reparcelling) Open field landscape of Artois Bocage landscape of the Boulonnais internal forces (tectonics) external forces (climate …) development, organisation, capital, entrepreneurship perception observer s i g h t s m e l l h e a r i n g f e e l i n g Commitment – knowledge – memory – emotion – age …
  8. 8. g n g Commitment – knowledge – memory – emotion – age … recorded image recorded experience other sensations measurements perception (objective value) (subjective value) relief morphology degree of building variation spatial structure transparancy panoramic feeling attractiveness security sense of space naturalness landscape values spatial value socio-economic value natural value aesthetic value historical value panoramic opportunities – openess – transparancy – scale – relational structure - habitability - opportunities for agriculture, recreation, traffic - natural variation - ecological richness - biological dynamic - diversity of forms - colorfulness - compostion - light variation - evoking memories - association woth expreriences - showing the past Monotonous production landscape Intricate and varied residential landscape
  9. 9. Protecting the landscape: the European Landscape Convention • adopted by the Council of Europe, 2000 • obliges the signatory member countries of EU to incorporate the landscape dimension in their legislation  policies with possible direct or indirect impact on landscape • covers all landscapes, both outstanding and ordinary or even degraded, that determine the quality of people’s living environment. • provides a framework for integrated intergovernmental efforts towards the preservation of landscape character and its quality
  10. 10. Landscape character assessment • an environmental system must be assessed before planning, for the purpose of decision-making and learning • One of the major principles, which ELC is based on, is the identification of landscape character, as well as the pressures and drivers of change, as regards the implementation of strategies for landscape management, planning, and protection. Such principles and strategies require a systematic knowledge of their variation, spanning the full range of spatial scales that define the landscape level, i.e., in landscape typologies (Terkenli et al., 2021).
  11. 11. two major types of attributes, or components, related to landscapes: • the bio-physical attributes linked to natural (e.g. geology, soils, landform, hydrology, climatic conditions) and socio-cultural (e.g. land use, settlement pattern, economic activities) inheritance where a landscape is considered in space, and • the perceptual/aesthetic attributes linked to how a landscape is perceived, with regard to scenic quality, visual beauty and human well-being.
  12. 12. The purpose of landscape classification is to initially identify areas of distinct character, and then classify and map them. specific combinations of natural, socio-cultural and perceptual attributes existing in different areas lead to similar landscape character types
  13. 13. 5 stages in GIS-based holistic LCA methodological framework employing public participation, • Purpose definition • Desk-based data collection • Field-based data collection • Classification • Overall evaluation
  14. 14. Landscape character assessment Case Gentbrugse meersen and Damvallei
  15. 15. Geography Gentbrugse Meersen and Damvallei 650 ha nature area in Ghent • 240 ha Gentbrugse meersen • 410 ha Damvallei
  16. 16. Damvallei Gentbrugse Meersen
  17. 17. Natura 2000 - Zeeschelde • Tidal zone of the river Scheldt – “the artery of Flanders” • Total of 8957 ha • 16 protected habitats, 13 protected species • Also multifunctional landscape in a highly dynamic and economic region • Included in SIGMA: to protect the area against flooding and promote specific nature qualities
  18. 18. Sigmaplan – until 2030
  19. 19. Geology, geomorphology, soils Coastal marsland was grazed by sheep until the land reclaimation and the development of polderland Dry sandy soils used as grazing land, later reforested Higher sandy loamy soils used as cropland Wet alluvial marshland produced hay Wet sandy soils were drained (after De Moor & Heyse 1995) Site of Ghent
  20. 20. Fields on wet soils are bordered with ditches Riverbanks and dunes limit alluvial plain Rivers and canals have embankements Digital Elevation Model based on Lidar (© AGIV) docks Blandijn Kuip
  21. 21. kouters (openfield) Meersen (marsh lands) bulken (bocage landscape) Reforested common grazing land and dunes Scheldt Scheldt  Situation 1770  Map de Ferraris
  22. 22.  Situation 1770  Map de Ferraris
  23. 23.  Situation 1863  Dépôt de la Guerre
  24. 24.  Situation 1950  l' Institut Géographique Militaire
  25. 25.  Situation 1982  Nationaal Geografisch Instituut
  26. 26.  Situation 1982  Nationaal Geografisch Instituut
  27. 27. © Stad Gent
  28. 28.  Situation 1982  Nationaal Geografisch Instituut
  29. 29. © Sigmaplan
  30. 30. Biological evaluation map
  31. 31. Grasslands
  32. 32. Natura 2000 - habitats
  33. 33. Potential natural vegetation (A) Wet alder forest (B) Oak beech forest A B (A) (B)
  34. 34. Cultural heritage
  35. 35. Testing: Exercise landscape ecology
  36. 36. Niina Käyhkö 24.1.2012 I N T E R A C T I O N ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC ENVIRONMENT SPATIAL PATTERNS Pattern – process – change Landscape as a spatio-temporal system
  37. 37. Concepts to be analysed 1. Interaction between spatial pattern and processes 2. Connectivity and connectedness 3. Multifunctionality 4. Landscape heterogeneity and diversity > Mapping the pattern, structure – landscape elements (land cover) > Mapping the functions (land use), management > Use of landscape metrics to quantify the spatial pattern of land cover and landscape elements
  38. 38. 1. Interaction between spatial pattern and processes 2. Connectivity and connectedness 3. Multifunctionality 4. Landscape heterogeneity and diversity > Focus on fragmentation of habitats, functions > Use of landscape metrics to quantify the qualities of connectivity and fragmentation Concepts to be analysed
  39. 39. 1. Interaction between spatial pattern and processes 2. Connectivity and connectedness 3. Multifunctionality 4. Landscape heterogeneity and diversity Concepts to be analysed
  40. 40. 1. Interaction between spatial pattern and processes 2. Connectivity and connectedness 3. Multifunctionality 4. Landscape heterogeneity and diversity B a B B B B a a a a a D 100m Concepts to be analysed
  41. 41. Ortho 90 Raster analysis: cell as spatial integrator to calculate entropy Destelbergen Verrebroek 250m²x250m²
  42. 42. 2 transects per raster • 3 types • Area • line • points • 3 time periods Antrop 1998
  43. 43. Antrop 1998 Destelbergen: changes Destelbergen: evolution entropy land use 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0 Entropy (bits) Frequency 1910 1962 1995 1962 1910 1995 suburban Homogeneous heterogeneous Low # cat Dominant cat Large # cat Fragmentated 104 transects
  44. 44. Mapping and monitoring landscape, habitats, biodiversity
  45. 45. OBSERVATION SHEET – GEOLAND Date: ID observation (letter transect + number sample): Hour: Place (village): Observers: GPS X – coordinate: Y- coordinate: Z-coordinate: Distance to previous sample point (m) Weather conditions: Photograph numbers: 1. Topography: (1) flat (2) slope (N S E W) (3) undulating In case of slope: concave – convex 2. Slope: (1) 0-2° (2) 2-8° (3) 8-22° (4) > 22° Exact percentage or degrees (to be calculated based on XYZ coordinates) 3. Soil Moisture conditions: |----------------------------------------------------------------------| (circle along the gradient) dry wet Colour soil (Munsell scale code): Top-soil conditions: (circle one or more options) (1) bare bedrock (> 75%) (2) bedrock, partially bare (50/50%) (3) loose soils dominating (>75%): gravel, clay, sand, loam, marl (circle one or more options) (4) man-made, anthropogenic Other bedrock, soil or topography observations of the site (erosion, weathering, deposition): 4. Vegetation If yes, specify Ground layer coverage: (1) bare % (2) grass % (3) herbs % (4) cultivated % Number of tree & scrub layers: 0 1 2 more Layer heights: (1) < 0,3m (2) 0,3-0,6m (3) 0,6-2m (4) 2-5m(5) > 5m Coverage: (1) open <25% (2) semi-open 25-50% (3) semi-closed 50-75% (4) closed >75% Spatial distribution: (1) continuous (2) uneven (3) patchy 5. Management What are the current land use activities in this area? Are there any evidences of past land uses in the site today? Are there any animals? Which and how much? 6. Conclusion General Habitat category Global/env. qualifier Site qualifier Man. qualifier Life form/species Comment Life form % Species %
  46. 46. • More information • https://www.geolandproject.eu • https://www.facebook.com/GEOLANDthePROJECT

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